vicarious

A and B Plans: Part time work

38 posts in this topic

One of the biggest problems with trying to find a second job when under a dance contract is that the company usually requires that you are at 'work' from 10-5 each weekday (excluding Mondays) and a full day on Saturday as well. When in a performance period, dancers need to be at the theater until 9 or 10 at night as well. This knocks out many of the jobs that are mentioned here that do not require a college degree, but do transpire during the same hours that a dancer must be at the studio.

 

When my daughter was under contract and wanted a part-time job, it was quite hard to find an employer whose hours were such that she could fit them in around the dance schedule. Restaurants that are open until 12 or 1 at night are where dancers often end up, simply because their hours do not overlap with their dance commitments. Office temp work or dance retail would be great, but it is only possible on Mondays when the company is not working during the day, as most of the dance stores in areas where we have lived do not have expanded hours or Sunday hours. Few retail employers are interested in workers who can only work one day a week (or perhaps two, if they are open on Sundays). So, it does become a lot more problematic. Working at a dept. retail store is an idea, but most are not open past nine, meaning that if you are under contract until 5, you can't get to the job until 6, so it is just a 3 hour shift and it is all on your feet!

 

So, finding a skill that you can do from home such as web design, technical writing, programming, etc. is really very ideal. You set your own hours and as long as the work is delivered before the deadline, when you do it is of no import to the customer. However, being in this line of work and a telecommuter myself who freelanced for about 16 years, I can tell you that most employers will expect that you have certain credentials, to include a college degree and training/experience in the field. So, it is not a second career that one can just decide to do, without some preparation and experience, unless you happen into a situation where you can convince the customer that you have acquired those skills on your own and can demonstrate proficiency and knowledge sufficient for them to entrust you with access to their computer systems.

 

My daughter knew a number of fellow dancers in her company who worked at local health clubs, teaching early morning yoga or Pilates classes before coming to company class and would do the same in the evenings after rehearsals were over.

 

Don't know about Citibob's situation, but I do know traders (non-dancers) whose work hours begin very very early in the morning and their markets may be closed early in the day on the east coast (ideal for folks who live further west who don't mind being up in the wee hours of the morning), particularly if they are dealing in foreign markets. But these are highly sought after jobs and require specific training, certification, experience, and education.

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I 'm wondering if anyone is aware of any dance company exploring compatible PT employment for dancers through corporate sponsors. I'm thinking of arrangements perhaps similar to what Home Depot and UPS do for Olympic athletes, except on a more local scale. Perhaps some level of sponsorship benefit could be offered for corporations that participated. Any ideas on the chances of this providing work opportunities?

 

Does anyone know of any companies that may have provided assistance to dancers in securing PT employment and how it worked?

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In addition to a dancer I'm also a photographer, specifically a dance photographer. Originally just for fun and out of curiosity, not to supplement my income. Photography is an expensive hobby. Several years later people started wanting to buy my photographs, and now I have a business that will eventually turn into my next career.

 

A good deal of the most renowned dance photographers were themselves dancers first.

 

Most of my income comes from doing portraits, or audition photos for younger dancers. How many photographers give you ballet corrections on how to make your line look better in a photograph?

 

My husband, also a dancer, is into videography and graphic design. We've combined all of our work into a single business.

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This is a very interesting topic for me. My daughter is only 9, but I realize that she is going to have to have a second choice for a career, just in case she changes her mind, I don't see that happening, or in case of injury. She wants to be an artist, another very difficult career!! She shows a lot of potential, maybe she will paint dancers.. I still think college is a must, I just don't know when or for what.. She still has 9 years to figure it all out! Anyone combined art with dance?

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I 'm wondering if anyone is aware of any dance company exploring compatible PT employment for dancers through corporate sponsors.

 

I have seen this happen. But more in terms of a list mentioned of sponsors who have employed dancers in the past because of the affiliation with a sponsor and suggestions for the dancer to start within this group.

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As far as retail p/t work, my non ds worked at Abercrombie. His athletic schedule (football and hockey) was also problematic and Abercrombie hires scores of teens and is very flexible about scheduling. He actually learned that he hates retail work but it was a job! :P

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My son does Temp work. He just gives them the hours he's available, and they find him jobs that fit around his schedule. He also has the option of choosing only day-to-day stuff, or seeking a longer term if he has some good amount of time off.

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As far as retail p/t work, my non ds worked at Abercrombie. His athletic schedule (football and hockey) was also problematic and Abercrombie hires scores of teens and is very flexible about scheduling. He actually learned that he hates retail work but it was a job! :P

This was the same retail job my DD did as her first PT job, but the hours and hours on her feet drained her so much that by the time she hit the studio there wasn't much energy left.

 

Fortunately, she came to her own conclusion and left Abercrombie for work as an assist in the office of a building developer one year, and a interior designer the following year. She drew members of her office work as audience members at her ballet company's performances because of this working relationship, and now the children of her office boss are going to attend the company school as students.

 

She was fortunate to have two bosses who love and sponsor the arts and understand her schedule. She just returned from dancing for a week with her company in Europe, and her office boss was excited for her and happy for her return.

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