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Ludmilla

Contretemps/Demi-contretemps --

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I understand your confusion, Ludmilla--the step in the video is not what I know as contretemps, either. I would call that a temps levé arabesque followed by failli and chassé en avant. In a contretemps, after the raised arabesque leg comes down in front, the other leg would open out to the side or front, and there would be a little jump to change legs to go the other direction.

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Agree with Hans....the step in the video is not what I would call contretemps. To do what I consider full contretemps (jumped) would be for the arabesque leg (left leg) to faille through first into tombe croise with the right leg in stretched tendu back. Rond de jambe the right leg en dedans to efface front and with a little jump bring legs together a with a coupe change of weight onto the right foot bring the left leg through a small developpe to efface front....this happens "against the time" which is how I describe contretemps.

 

Good luck!

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Mr. Hans, and Temps de cuisse -- That is good to hear... Thanks for explaining why the video did not look to you like what you consider full contretemps, and for reiterating the sequence of elements comprising the step. I am on my way to understanding it so much better! i appreciate all feedback and am sure that all comments are based on valid experience and learning in various venues..... again, an interesting aspect of this particular step that there are such -- and some fairly wide -- differences.

 

I'll work on becoming more accustomed to the step.

 

Temps de cuisse, thanks for mentioning where the "against time" moment is, because of the way that certainly relates to the name - so important to being able to understand the "sense" of it.

 

Thanks very much -- Ludmilla

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It may help to break down the step into component elements, a contretemps is a composite step. In the video they are basically performing a posé temps levé finishing with a brush through to 4th followed by a coupé dessous (under) before starting to the other side. In a true contretemps the coupé should be dessus (over) with a small developpé passé devant before starting the 2nd side.

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Doubleturn,

 

Is the pose temp leve a component element of the (full) contretemps itself? Or is the contretemps only the small portion (what I'd call "the linking portion"), of the brush through to 4th/coupe dessous - which you mentioned, should be desus (over)/small developpe passe devant (to repeat this to the other side)? If so, would you consider that 'small, linking portion' a form of demi-contretemps, or full contretemps? Again, I'm asking as I become more familair w/ the possibly various forms of the step, and the designations of demi- vs. full contretemps. Thank you,

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I don't think it is helpful to get too analytical or over-think combinations. If you were studying for a theory exam, then you would have their definition in your text book or notes. If you are attending classes, just dance the step, different teachers will have been taught different labels for the same movement.

 

As you appeared to be having trouble I was merely trying to break down the combination into bite sized pieces.

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Yes, that will help, looking at it as you said, Doubleturn. As I've come to realize (especially w/ this particular step for some reason) it's good to "stay on your toes" and 'expect the unexpected' as different teachers may use a different term for a particular step --- or may teach a different version of a step I had learned differently from another teacher.... Again this discussion has been most helpful -- Thanks.

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I've never actually heard of a contretemps! Only a full contretemps or demi contretemps! Having said that no doubt it exists and every system of teaching has different versions and calls things differently. Like Doubleturn and Miss Persistant I teach RAD and they are very specific as to what they want! For a start failli and demi contretemps are two very different steps. Failli starts from 5th croise and is similar to a sissone landing in a low arabesque and followed by a chasse passe to croise, except that the legs are supposed to cling together before opening out to land the sissone. However, demi contretemps starts from an open position on one leg - often degage derriere - and is just a small temps leve in arabesque followed by a chasse passe, also usually taken croise to croise. A full contretemps has the addition of the coupe under and step into the temps leve in arabesque followed by the chasse passe. As someone mentioned above, it's always now taken with the coupe under rather than the coupe over with the little rond de jambe en dedans movement. If they do want that they'll ask for it specifically. So yes what you see in the video is simply 3 full contretemps followed by a step and soutenu - according to the RAD.

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Thanks for clarifying, Hamorah. That is what I remembered and that is what I have been teaching.

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Thanks Hamorah! Your breakdown and explanation of the step helps a lot! Thanks again Pas de Quoi for the video link. I will study these all in more detail --

 

i think teachers in my area at least say "contretemps" as a sort of shorthand when they mean "full contretemps" and most say "demi-contretemps" when they mean that step.... It causes confusion for a student such as myself, but for their regular students, it probably is clear....

 

This will really help in my recognizing and being accustomed to possible different versions of the step and different ways of referring to it. Thanks again -

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