Ice-Dancer

Issues with slippery floors

34 posts in this topic

I recently changed studios again, finding a studio that completely matches my goals and offers superb teaching. The only problem I have is with the floors...they are not the marley I've danced on my entire dancing life, but instead they are wood floors. I have canvas shoes and I use the rosin box, but this is the first time I've ever used rosin and I feel like during center, especially during jumps and turns, I am making several trips to the rosin box just to feel like I won't slip. During bar and basic center work, I don't mind a little slickness, because I feel like it forces me to hold on own turnout instead of forcing it. However, turns and jumping terrify me! Is this something I will get used to? Should I only have to go to the rosin box once? Are there other things I can do to feel more secure on the different floors? Do leather shoes help with this at all?

 

Thanks so much for the help! Sorry if this has been discussed before, I couldn't find much in the search.

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I typically take class in studios with marley but had occasion over the summer to take a few in a studio with wood floors. I hated it because it was so slippery. I used the rosin box a few times during class, but it didn't help that much because it just wasn't enough. I decided to take a spray bottle with water to spray the soles of my shoes regularly. It helped but was only a short term solution because it was my last class in that studio.

 

I have heard that leather slippers are better on wood but haven't tried it. If I were in your shoes (slippers :happy: ), I'd switch to leather. Also, do they have a rosin bag that you can actually slap all around the floor? Rosin only on the shoes really doesn't help when the problem is with the entire floor.

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Alas, my experience is similar to SewRibbons'--when I took classes at a school with wooden floors, they had a little tin dish of sorts that would have a wet paper towel (and/or a small amount of water) that we would lightly step into to wet our shoes for grip--I did sometimes find that it made me TOO sticky if I over did it. However, this method still involves going back to the dish repeatedly which doesn't solve your problem.

 

I've also heard of girls spraying the bottoms of their shoes with hairspray? Not sure of the effectiveness of that one, though (or how gross it might make the floor).

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One of the studios that I teach at has wooden floors. It is a ballet school, but they offer jazz a couple of times a week to the advanced students. I am there to teach the jazz. The students complain to me about the slippery floors and they tell me that their ballet teachers tell them to "use their feet". I don't know what they mean by that...I have been wetting the bottom of my shoes. The students tell me that it is even worse in pointe shoes. There is a rosin box, but apparently the ballet teachers there prefer that the students not use it. I was a bit perplexed by this as the dancers are quite lovely and well trained...I'm not sure what is to be gained by making them dance on a slick floor with non rosin.

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I danced in one place on slippery wooden floor and I always did several trips to the rosin box in the center because I was scared to turn, especially on pointe. I don't mind when a floor is slippery when I am at the barre but as soon as I move to the center and sometimes even on pointe, I don't want to risk anything!

 

Now I am in a place with a slippery wooden floor and no rosin box. I used to wear leather slippers but now I prefer the canvas slipper on it, because when I move to the center, they are rather wet from sweating and they stick a bit better. The leather slippers were too slippery on the floor. I think the teacher would mind if I'd use water but I have done this in other studios and for me it worked okay (let aside that if you overdo it, you will stick and when it dries you will slip again)

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Oh, how annoying! I severely dislike slippery floors.

One place I teach at occasionally has lovely, sprung wooden floors; but the owner was worried about the wood and had it varnished. :nixweiss: Not good. Now it is slippery as all get-out. (= a lot)

She has wet towels on two sides of the room, and students and teachers regularly go stomping around on those to get their slippers wet, which helps somewhat. Actually, water and resin help more if the floor has not been varnished or waxed. Sometimes it also helps to go around the studio with a spray bottle or watering can (as in Russia) and water /spray the floor before barre and then again before centre.

This does not help so much w/marley, though.

 

-d-

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Nothing like doing Chaînés (or some such) across the floor and hitting an especially heavy patch of rosin.

 

Honestly I always thought it was leather for wood and canvas for marley. Not true?

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Years and years ago, when we had to lasso passing pterodactyls to get to the studios, we wore leather ballet shoes on all floors- wood, tile, whatever, because we didn't yet have marley!!!!!!! Oy veh, I'm putting my walker away now.

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My very beginning class was in a studio with wood floors. Can't remember what kind of shoes I had, but perhaps because I had no prior experience, it didn't bother me at all. I do think that part of developing oneself as a performer is the ability to adapt to any kind of environment. If you let your environment bother you, you aren't going to dance your best.

 

Where I practice at home there is a wooden floor. If anything it is stickier than the marley where I dance.

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Kini is correct, wear Leather shoes. If you are "afraid" of turning, you are likely not balanced correctly.

 

Rosin can damage wood floors if used in excess, a little goes a long way.

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My very beginning class was in a studio with wood floors. Can't remember what kind of shoes I had, but perhaps because I had no prior experience, it didn't bother me at all. I do think that part of developing oneself as a performer is the ability to adapt to any kind of environment. If you let your environment bother you, you aren't going to dance your best.

 

Where I practice at home there is a wooden floor. If anything it is stickier than the marley where I dance.

Hello! I am wondering if you could tell me what wood floor finish you have down on your wood floor at home? I teach on a wood floor, and it is great- the finish is not slippery, but the manufacturer is discontinuing that finish. So I am looking for a wood floor finish that would be "stickier than marley" like you describe. Can't wait to hear! Thank you!

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What is often used on wood floors is a product called "Slip No More". It is easy to put down (just dilute it and mop it onto a clean floor and then allow it to dry). It wears away over a period of time (depending upon how much use the floor gets) and doesn't have any harsh chemical warnings associated with it.

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Years and years ago, when we had to lasso passing pterodactyls to get to the studios, we wore leather ballet shoes on all floors- wood, tile, whatever, because we didn't yet have marley!!!!!!! Oy veh, I'm putting my walker away now.

 

I remember a similar time Clara, where we didn't even have to option of canvas shoes!! There was no such thing! It was leather always - or for our exams it was precious pink satin. Oh those beautiful pink satin shoes were so perfectly clean and untouched! Until after one class on a dirty old wooden floor ;)

 

In my experience it's normal to have to make more than one trip to the rosin box or the wet sponge. Over time, you often get used to dancing on the slicker surface and then you need less and less water/rosin if it's what you're using regularly.

 

I have used 'slip-no more' at a studio a few years ago, from memory it worked well. I have also danced on stages washed in soda (soft-drink) where the sticky sugar in the drink makes the floor less slippery. It can then just be washed off with clean water later. Maybe not a good solution for a studio but works for stages where you can't lay Marley.

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msemily, the floors in my house are ordinary wooden floors. I'm totally ignorant about them. When it is humid, the floor is extremely sticky. If it is winter and cold inside, the surface is much slicker. Since 2013, I've stopped dancing at home. Only do modern now at the school where we are barefooted. Prefer a slick floor over a sticky floor now any time.

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Ms. Clara - Your comment is too funny not to note!!!! Made my day!!!!!!!! :clapping::D:grinning::huepfen:

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