Jump to content


Jogging, not running


  • Please log in to reply
10 replies to this topic

#1 ifnotwhynot

ifnotwhynot

    Bronze Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 319 posts
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:ballet mum

Posted 03 April 2011 - 10:27 AM

My just 13 yr old daughter (first post in the 13+ section!) trains seriously at a vocational school and tells me that she has started jogging around the grounds in the evenings. I know she means jogging, not running, and that it is very low intensity and maybe for 10 - 15 minutes a day and is mainly on grass. She also wears proper trainers.

I have read that running is definitely to be discouraged so is this likely to be causing her any harm?

#2 lemlemish

lemlemish

    Silver Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPipPip
  • 693 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:ballet
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:parent, beginning adult student

Posted 03 April 2011 - 10:35 AM

One of the problems with running is that serious ballet students tend to run with the feet and legs slightly turned out, putting pressure on the wrong parts of their feet and ankles. However, if it is only 10 minutes, it may not do much harm. It just seems like if she is looking for exercise, there may be better ways of doing it.

#3 ifnotwhynot

ifnotwhynot

    Bronze Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 319 posts
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:ballet mum

Posted 05 April 2011 - 10:15 AM

So, is the impact of jogging less intense on the body than it is from running or is it just that 10 mins a day is probably OK regardless?

#4 Clara 76

Clara 76

    Diamonds Circle

  • Global Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,988 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:Ex-ballet dancer, Company Shoe Mistress, ballet teacher, and mom of a male dancer!

Posted 06 April 2011 - 01:35 AM

I guess I'm confused about what you mean by there being a difference between "jogging" and "running"? To me they are one and the same. Impact from gravity and footstrike. Though one may be moving at a faster pace while running, the impact problems are still present as are the problems with ballet dancers hitting the ground improperly.

Bottom line is: Unless she has a PE instructor who is working with her on the techniques of jogging/running, it may present problems for her.

How does the residential school feel about this, and is your main concern perhaps rooted in her reasons for deciding to undertake this extra?

"A smooth sea never made a skilled sailor"- (Currently poking Poseidon in the netherworld with his trident)

"Christian Louboutins are uncomfortable, but I screamed the first time I put on a pointe shoe." Mila Kunis


#5 ifnotwhynot

ifnotwhynot

    Bronze Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 319 posts
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:ballet mum

Posted 06 April 2011 - 04:07 AM

Well, I'm no expert but I know that when I run (rarely!!) the impact seems greater than when I jog because I hit the ground faster and from a greater height.

She doesn't have anyone working with her on running technique and I haven't spoken to the school but I may ask the school physio what she thinks - that is a good idea.

I have no hidden concerns about this at all and I'm not sure where you are coming from in suggesting this! I think it is a lovely idea as she has been going with a few friends and it gets them outrside for a while but I do want to make sure she isn't causing herself any damage before encouraging her to continue!

#6 Victoria Leigh

Victoria Leigh

    Administrator

  • Administrators
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 31,309 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:Teacher
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:Teacher

Posted 06 April 2011 - 07:48 AM

I would suggest walking if the friends want to get outside for a while. They get enough impact in their ballet classes! :3dnod:

Victoria Leigh
Administrator


LIFE ISN'T ABOUT WAITING FOR THE STORM TO PASS...
...IT'S LEARNING HOW TO DANCE IN THE RAIN! [Unknown]


#7 Clara 76

Clara 76

    Diamonds Circle

  • Global Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 15,988 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:Ex-ballet dancer, Company Shoe Mistress, ballet teacher, and mom of a male dancer!

Posted 06 April 2011 - 01:19 PM

Agree with Victoria- walking is really good exercise and offers the opportunity for a little girl-bonding!

Sorry if I offended- no intention to do so- just wondering if there were other concerns. :3dnod:

"A smooth sea never made a skilled sailor"- (Currently poking Poseidon in the netherworld with his trident)

"Christian Louboutins are uncomfortable, but I screamed the first time I put on a pointe shoe." Mila Kunis


#8 ifnotwhynot

ifnotwhynot

    Bronze Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 319 posts
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:ballet mum

Posted 07 April 2011 - 06:04 AM

I will certainly suggest walking but I don't expect much enthusiasm. Going for a family walk is not high on her enjoyment list and that is when we have rivers and mountains etc to look at along the way; I'm not sure school buildings will do it for her!

#9 gasguzzler

gasguzzler

    Bronze Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:summer intensives, schools, ballet, contemporary, modern
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:mother

Posted 16 June 2012 - 08:04 AM

My daughter has a sports requirement at her school. I have tried to get it waived due to her daily ballet commitment. The school has said that she can take an intermural level or B team sport that she would have to participate at least a minimum of three of the days. Her advisor is trying to get that changed to two days so that she will have an extra two studyhalls. In the fall her choices are cross country, field hockey or soccer. Is one of these better or safer than the other? She did cross country last year trying to stay away from sticks and ###### and avoid getting hurt. Any advice?

#10 dancemaven

dancemaven

    Diamonds Circle

  • Global Moderator
  • PipPipPipPipPipPipPipPip
  • 8,783 posts
  • Gender:Not Telling
  • Interests:Ballet parent
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:parent

Posted 16 June 2012 - 10:51 AM

As I read more and more, and as my kiddoes have gotten older, I have come to the belief that the kids of today are very much missing something needed when they eschew the cross-training that comes with doing a variety of activities. Honestly, very little the kids do in a PE class at middle school or high school is not so intensive that it would harmful, in and of itself, to our physically fit kids. Now, granted, because of their focus on turn-out, there are things, such as running, that could cause some issues IF done incorrectly. But really, as long as they are mindful of putting away their ballet 'tools, specifically turn-out, and utilize the natural parallel gait, then they will only be better off for the cross-training of these muscles. The eye-hand co-ordination that come with field hockey and the eye-foot co-ordination that comes with soccer are additional benefits. Also, the increase strength and stabilization of the ankle muscles that comes with running, changing direction, and start/stopping on uneven ground on an outdoor soccer or field hockey field will be helpful to better support the tendons and ligaments in the ankle and front of the foot.

If one trains only in ballet (or dance) and utilizes only those muscles, then one runs the risk of being weakened in the unused muscles and an imbalance may arise in terms of supporting muscles.

Now, that's my own personal conclusions, so I may be all wet. But, I have to say that with both daughters (one a pre-pro serious dancer, the other an elite-level athlete), any time either had injuries, that was a basic tenent of discussion by their various orthopods, podiatric surgeon, physical therapists, chiropractor, athletic trainers, and supporting medical personnel. It is coming up more and more as the kids specialize in sports or other activities more and more, earlier and earlier.

The risk of injury in the PE classes isn't any greater for the dancer than it is for anyone else, in my personal opinion---as long as the dancer puts away her turnout. (Clara76 described it that way once and it made soooooo much more sense: put the tools away when not needed.)

Now are there sports or activities that are counter-productive to the muscle usage in ballet? Yes, ---for example, Major Mel has discussed extensive dressage as one such activity. Elite-level ice-skating, elite-level gymnastics, elite-level competitive swimming, serious distance runner training are others. But, recreational activites are most probably more beneficial than harmful.

#11 gasguzzler

gasguzzler

    Bronze Circle

  • PTA Member
  • PipPipPipPip
  • 408 posts
  • Gender:Female
  • Interests:summer intensives, schools, ballet, contemporary, modern
  • Connection to/Interest in Ballet:mother

Posted 16 June 2012 - 05:20 PM

The sports block at DD's school is 1.5 hours 4 days a week and whenever she gets injured its not during ballet, but sports or jumping around at home. Personally I think if she is taking ballet every day it isn't necessary to do a sport, but the school believes that the sports block in the middle of the day is a necessary break in the schedule, and since the academic classes are each 75 minutes long, meeting every other day, they are probably right about that. It's just too bad they don't offer a ballet class during this time. I hear what you are saying Dancemaven about the cross training. It seems to make sense. I just don't want her to turn an ankle or something and then have to sit out of ballet class.