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1.Need wide Satin Slippers + 2.When did you know?

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Mel Johnson

The problem is that that particular line may be coming to an end, and further, the need is for wide satin shoes. Capezio satin tekniks only come in medium width. Tekniks made of satin are no stiffer than canvas full-sole shoes.

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Guest clickhere

Thank you all for your replies and your understanding. I had my first taste of ballet connected ugliness last week and I didn't weather it well. I was trying not to be too negative the day I posted, I was feeling quite troubled but am much better now.

 

 

(I suffer from people-pleasing-middle-child-disorder and forget that sometimes people are just looking for SOMEONE, ANYONE to be mad at) :yes:

 

 

Thank you for the info about the satin shoes. One of DD's teacher is from England doesn't that make the shiny shoes little bit ok? (grin)

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LadyR

BalletAuthor,

 

If the original poster asked the question “When did you realize your child would be the next prima ballerina?” then I could understand the content of your post. As I understood it, the question was simply “When did your realize that ballet was your child’s passion?” Therefore I did not understand the direction of your post in reply to my answer, and the negativity was unexpected. But perhaps I have misinterpreted your tone. I will try not to take offense as you suggest, but when you questioned whether I would find the journey wonderful “if other adults did not find my daughter extraordinary” is insulting and hurtful.

 

I can assure you that I am not looking for some grand prize at the end of the road. This is my daughter’s journey and if it was not “fun” for her then I would question whether she should be traveling down this road. At 10 years old it should be fun. Hard work? Yes. But if it is your passion, you would have it no other way. And if she wants to dream of becoming a ballerina, so be it. She understands that there is no guarantee for the future. But I will not quench her dreams today.

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dancemaven
When did you know...

 

That for your daughter, ballet was going to be an all consuming passion, at least through high school?

 

Whether the question is that above or "when did you know she'd be the next prima ballerina", my answer would remain: "When she gets there."

 

If she is currently consumed with ballet, foregoes all other activities in favor of ballet, chooses to go to class rather than a-less-than-best-buddy classmate's birthday party (and is very torn about attending her best buddy's), then I'd say she is there----at this moment in time. But who knows how long that moment will last. For some children/dancers, it lasts a lifetime, for others only a season. For many others, various points along the looong continuum.

 

If, however, she enjoys class one week, but not the next, or asks to skip class because Sally asked her to come play, or because American Idol is on at the same time as class, then I'd say it is safe to say she's not at the "all consuming passion" point. Although that may not necessarily mean she won't reach that passion point somewhere along the line, it is my observation that girls, at least, show the kind of passion necessary for the long haul at a very young age--and usually it begins not long after they first appear at the studio.

 

So the question, really, is "when did you know how long she would sustain that passion?" That answer, I still think, is: You'll know when she gets there and not any sooner.

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LadyR

I do agree!! :blushing: It's my mistake that I did not take the original poster's words "until high school" to mean literally, through high school. You are absolutely right! You'll know when you get there. I do think a parent can tell if this ballet "thing" is fleeting or if the passion is there to possibly continue into the future. The passion does not make it a guarantee - but a possibility.

Edited by LadyR

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mmded

I may be opening up a can of worms, but here I go. I think it is different for parents of girls than boys. If you do not treat your dancing daughter's passion very seriously by the age of ten or eleven you can perhaps prevent them from reaching their dreams. As a parent you have to get them the best training available and be willing to supplement it with stretch or strength training etc. by age ten or eleven or your daughter may not develop the necessary skills and strength to pursue a professional dancing career. There is nother sadder than seeing female dancers who had tons of potential at a younger age but are now totally without hope for a future in ballet. Several of my dancer's peers had probably more natural gifts and potential than my daughter but their parents and they did not make choices that would enable them to develop their feet and turnout for pointe work. These girls then decided at fourteen or fifteen that they would indeed like to auditon for professional schools to become classical dancers and they and their parents were shocked and devastated by the outcome.

I am sure that if anyone saw me driving my then eleven year old all over the city for different classes and coaching they would think I was pushing my daughter. In reality my daughter did the pushing. She would never miss a class or an opportunity that she felt would help her better her dancing. She always was the first to arrive and the last to stop.

That said, we still make school a first priority. If she is not willing to do the extra work (correspondance) she will not be able to continue dancing at the level she is.

I think, as a parent, you have to be very careful to provide the necessary foundation for your dancer at an early age. It is tricky to maintain a healthy and objective view of ballet when you are investing so much time and effort into ballet at your child's young age.

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K8smom

When did I know? I can't say that I ever KNEW, but when Kait was about 13, I had a pretty good idea that she wasn't going to give it up...A regional company was performing the Nutcracker in several towns in our state, using local kids for many parts, as many companies do. She was a party child for performances in a nearby town, but in a town about three hours away, they didn't have enough kids audition for the party scene, so they used Kait's group instead. This involved going on the bus with the company - big excitement, right? So I took her to the bus early in the morning (one hour drive from our home). They drove two hours on twisty roads in the bus and got to the town. They rehearsed in the theatre. They had lunch at the Safeway deli. They went back to the theatre for the matinee. They had dinner at the Safeway deli. They went back to the theatre for the evening show. They got back on the bus, and drove two hours back on the twisty roads. I met the bus in the parking lot of the motel where the company members were staying, which was not a dive, but not what you'd call glamourous, either. Then we drove home (another hour) and got back about 1AM. I thought, great, this is a taste of how it really is, being a dancer - long bus trips, dinner at Safeway, late, late hours and staying in not-the-best motels. I asked her if, since she'd had a glimpse of reality, she still wanted to be a professional dancer? She said, "Oh, yeah! It was great! I LOVED it!" At that point I realized that she might be in it for the long haul.

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sgmca

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