Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers
Sign in to follow this  
syr

2002-2005 Parental Transition Support Group

Recommended Posts

Pierrette   
Pierrette
One might suppose, from these cases and yours, that Juilliard isn't very interested in ballet students but in at least one of the cases I mentioned, the dancer is an excellent modern dancer as well.

 

It is my daughter's modern teacher who is the Juilliard grad. Her modern seems to be considered even better than her ballet, as it was the chair of the dance department at the university here who invited my daughter to take class in his department since he feels that she has "a future in contemporary dance". Alvin Ailey's SI accepted her last year when she only had had less than a year of modern at that point. Lines Ballet just accepted her for this year.

Share this post


Link to post
Pierrette   
Pierrette
She was told that she was actually vying for one of only 2-3 spaces for caucasian girls. They explained that they were very interested in diversity at Julliard and this was indeed a big factor in the decision making process.

 

Hm. I think this explains a lot. The two girls on either side of my daughter (who talked to her) made the cut and they were Asian. If this is the case, then I feel that they should be more up-front about their racial preferences in order to demystify things since technique did not seem to be the deciding factor.

 

Thank you so much for sharing this information.

Share this post


Link to post
LMCtech   
LMCtech

The Julliard website states very clearly that they do not discriminate based on race, gender, etc. This is university code for we are looking to fill quotas. there is a big push in dance to see more "colors" on stage, but still the majority of ballet students are white. That means a smaller percentage of white students are going to get in. I don't think based on their website information that they can legally get anymore up front about their admissions policies.

 

Like any program they are looking for dancers who are going to best fit into their program and they are probably very clear on what they are looking for even if they can't concisely articulate it on a website.

Share this post


Link to post
Jamon   
Jamon

Syr,

 

My thoughts are with you and your daughter during this time. :) We went through the audition season last year and I remember chatting with you regarding the stress. Best of luck to your DD.

 

Jamon

Share this post


Link to post
tu2mama   
tu2mama
:) My daughter's sweating it and the audition is a month away. She's already in her college of choice but not in their dance department. The dance department allows students to audition two times and then you're out of luck. I suppose some programs have only one audition and it's over so at least there's a second chance. This will be my daughter's second audition. She has been taking the beginning level non-major dance classes as advised both semesters. She auditioned for a couple of SI's this year, didn't get into the one she would have liked, so she hasn't auditioned for any others. She's ready to call it quits if the college thing doesn't work out. These last months have been stressful. She seems to want to put all of her eggs in one basket. She only applied to one college, never auditions for very many SI's. I guess she's afraid of rejection although when rejected she acts like it doesn't bother her . It's hard for her because younger girls at her studio are now being accepted into dance programs and colleges right and left and I know she feels like a looser. Try to explain things to her how she has limited herself and she gets defensive. We have always supported her and made sacrifices to let her do the thing that she wanted,ballet. She went to an SI last summer and really improved, we were willing to send her this year but alas the teenage funk set in. She'll be fine once all of this is over despite the outcome but living with her now is quite difficult. She has enjoyed college so far and is becoming interested in many new things so I don't think she'll have a hard time finding a major if dance doesn't work out. Just get us through this month and the long weekend after the audition waiting for the results.

Share this post


Link to post
Pattec1   
Pattec1

We have finally finished the college auditon process and now the big "decison" process starts. DD auditoined for 4 college program and got the "declined your request for admission" letter from her top choice that happens to be the only program that had the "in-state" tuition price tag attached. :) She tried desparately not to show her disappointment and she has moved on to trying to decide between the programs she has been accepted to. Ironically a college dance program is not what she wants , period. However she is wiilling to accept the fact thet she may need additional training before really striking out into that professional world.

 

Pierette, I understand where your coming from with the audition process. DD was very happy with her audition for her top choice and felt like she was noticed and discussed, she was happily awaiting the results from this audition. She knew upfront that Indiana was extremely difficult but I don't think she was really prepared for the "letter". We were told at the audition that they are very selective and this year because the program was at capacity they would be very very selective. Some how this doesn't lessen the pain for these kids vying for spots in coveted prgrams and we will never know how the powers that be decide who gets in and who doesn't. Don't fret , dk will fond a good fit. Julliard just wasn't it.

 

Tu2mama, Has your daughter considered defering her first college year and continuing her ballet training excusively for one more year before entering college? Most colleges will allow you to defer your acceptance for one year. Is it possible for her to get some of her other required credits out of the way the first year while continuing her training either at the college or at a good ballet school close by? We have looked into a school with a "post graduate program" as an alternative to going straight to college next year. She is attending there SI this summer to try on the fit and we will send money to her first college choice as a back-up if she ends up not liking the "feel" she gets from the SI. I just don't want to put all the eggs in one basket and I will risk $100 to not be in that position. Also I would encourage her to try for some of the leser known SI's where the training can be quite good. It is much easier for a dancer of 14 or 15 to get into that SI with a big compaony name than it is for those of 17 and 18.

 

We have also done a couple of company auditons. For the most part they have been cattle calls with more than 70 dancers vying for "maybe" positions with a company. Not sure I will encourage dd to continue this. I pesonally have a hard time not having a clear decison about where next year will lead her, but I am happy knowing that she does have some choices and will just be playing the th "wait and see" game. In my heart I truly believe that these things happen for a reason. In the end everything will work out the way it should. In the mean time I sit in my room and bite my nails!!

Share this post


Link to post
Guest BalletAuthor   
Guest BalletAuthor

Post deleted by moderator

Share this post


Link to post
Guest Watermill   
Guest Watermill

It's a very difficult transition from student to professional, isn't it? But listen, auditions are part of the professional process and always will be. I think one of the major side benefits of the SI madness is audition experience. Nerve-wracking, confusing, sometimes seemingly meaningless, but auditions serve a purpose: they mirror the pressure and steam of performance. If you can't bring it to an audition you can't bring it to a 3000 seat auditorium. The two great swings of the scythe: excellence of technique and favored physiology leave the true contenders standing. From that point on it's a drama worthy of a Tony award, with everyone playing their role to the hilt.

 

Truly professional dancers (or actors or musicians or singers) pounce on auditions like hungry tigers. Their attitude towards the those in the chairs behind the table making notes is: "I'm not auditioning for you; I'm dancing (acting/playing/singing) for me. Oh, and by the way: you're lucky that I came."

 

Sound kind of cocky? You bet. Does it get noticed? You bet.

 

Watermill

(Veteran of over 500 theatre auditions; both sides of the table)

Share this post


Link to post
e'smom   
e'smom

just FYI to Pattec 1, from a fellow Indiana resident - We have heard that it is even harder to get into the ballet department if you are in-state!

Share this post


Link to post
mylildancer   
mylildancer

Watermill, again I loved your post! I actually printed it up for my daughter so she can read it. We could only afford one live audition this last audition season, but she loved it! She thrives on the nervous excitement of performances and auditions. Not me! I have a near phobia when it comes to being in front of people. :D I guess these kids are just a different kind of breed! Kudos to all you parents out there for your support of your exceptional kids! :)

Share this post


Link to post
Pierrette   
Pierrette

LMCtech wrote:

The Julliard website states very clearly that they do not discriminate based on race, gender, etc. This is university code for we are looking to fill quotas. there is a big push in dance to see more "colors" on stage, but still the majority of ballet students are white. That means a smaller percentage of white students are going to get in. I don't think based on their website information that they can legally get anymore up front about their admissions policies.
Well, they freely admit that they have gender quotas - 12 men and 12 women - so why not include that there are racial quotas as well?

 

Pattec1 wrote:

Some how this doesn't lessen the pain for these kids vying for spots in coveted prgrams and we will never know how the powers that be decide who gets in and who doesn't. Don't fret , dk will fond a good fit. Julliard just wasn't it.
I just want to clarify that we weren't doing that kind of fretting. My daughter fully realized what a long shot it was to even hope to survive the three cuts in Juilliard's audition. But as I think many of the applicants would agree, they would at least be content with making the first cut, which is billed as being based on "strong technique". It is fully understood that the process is allowed to become more mysterious after that point, when "finding the right fit" plays a larger role. However, the cut applicants come out of the curtailed audition with a huge dose of unnecessary self-doubt when something besides technique skills is really the deciding factor at that point and they're not told that.

 

My daughter just went through the audition at her "home" university (where she takes class as a specially invited high school student) yesterday, and they don't employ cuts during the audition day. Neither does the University of the Arts, where she'll audition later this month (and they must work through 600 applicants to pick 80 students). When there aren't cuts, then it's reasonable to figure that "good fit" must play a role at some point in the final decision. But for Juilliard to make the cut after the technique portion of the audition before they see even one of the two contrasting solos, or see how the students take direction during the repertory instruction, then the students are left feeling that their technique must be deficient. (And remember, Juilliard is mostly modern-oriented, so body shapes have a bit more latitude and they don't emphasize any particular technique style.)

 

I also want to clarify that I posted only after my daughter already started to put the experience behind her, as she was able to put it into more context after hearing about her talented friend. I shared my daughter's story in hopes that it would help someone else to put their audition in some kind of context. I believe the upshot is that it is not the fault of the dancer's technique, so not to fret about that. Since technique is something that a dancer can reasonably control, then I think they need to hear that they shouldn't beat themselves up over this, as other factors - beyond their control - are at work at the first-cut stage.

 

I greatly appreciate the added insights gained from hearing of other students' experiences with the Juilliard audition.

 

P.S. Minor trivia note (even my spell-checker doesn't know this): Juilliard is spelled with two i's and two l's. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Guest BalletAuthor   
Guest BalletAuthor
The two great swings of the scythe: excellence of technique and favored physiology leave the true contenders standing. From that point on it's a drama worthy of a Tony award, with everyone playing their role to the hilt.

 

AMEN!

Share this post


Link to post
mcrm55   
mcrm55

Dear everyone,

 

I just wanted to throw into this discussion that someone I know who is extremely intimately connected to Juilliard, and who therefore has very likely discussed this issue with members/heads of the faculty there, just said to me this very morning that the Juilliard dance department is not really as interested in training young dancers for ballet. They simply feel there are plenty of other places that can do that more/better, so the other dance forms become proportionately more important. I hope this can explain something for your dds and dss; perhaps the obviously gifted BALLET dancer is assumed to have other training options, and they are trying to pick out those students they feel excited to have a hand in developing in other areas???? I regard the stage you and your dancers are facing with trepidation and admiration; if my dd didn't love it so much, I would whole-heartedly hope she never gets that far...good luck and best wishes, all.

Share this post


Link to post
BW   
BW

Eventually, we may hear from some other contenders out there - or from their parents. From reports that I've heard the auditions for ballet companies run the gamut from "no cuts" - which in itself cause great dismay to the vast number of auditioners in a ballet studio filled to overflowing (literally and figuratively):speechless: and to cuts made throughout the barre where the dancer must concentrate and remain focused without fear that the "tap" on the shoulder might come at any second.

 

And, do we even want to know about the costs involved with getting to auditions? :D

 

My intentions are not to sound negative here, but rather to add more to the mix of reality.

 

I say "Merde!" to all the dancers - and their families! :thumbsup: I commend your spirit, too. :)

Share this post


Link to post
Guest AFAmom   
Guest AFAmom

Well here is another snag in the college process anyway. My daughter got the financial aid package to her first choice school where she has also happily been accepted as a ballet major. It was a major disappointment! They did not meet our expected family contribution and most of the rest was loans and work study. I am all for my daughter working if there is any way she can possibly fit it into her schedule of academic classes, dance classes and rehearsals, but I honestly don't see how we can even pay the monthly payment on these loans. Anyone have any experience with this problem? Please help! :):D

Share this post


Link to post
Guest
This topic is now closed to further replies.
Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×