Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers
Claude_Catastrophique

Beats

Recommended Posts

Claude_Catastrophique

I finally learnt to beat properly and it works pretty well. The only problem I have with beats occurs in really fast combinations where two jumps in a row are beaten. If I do petit jeté beaten followe by a temps levé I am fine but if I have to do petit jeté beaten in a row on the right and left I feel between the jumps extremly heavy like glued to the floor. the same goes for double assemblé beaten.

 

As a result I am too slow and end up behind the music.

 

Is it just a matter of time to get stronger or is there any hint that would held me NOT to feel like a beached whale between two beaten jumps? :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
Balletlove

Hi,

 

Very curious as to how/what you have done to "finally learnt to beat properly" this is still one of the weakest pieces of my work so I would be very keen for anything that has worked for you although thanks to Miss Leigh at least mine are not horrific anymore!

 

I would guess that the challenge you are experiencing has to do with timing and rebound.

Maybe try allowing the music to dictate the rhythmn for you and keep the rhythmn going even if the steps are not perfect?!

Using rebound will help you not to feel tired, my teacher takes our hands and makes us feel when you should be up it is (in my case) always a lot sooner than I think. If you are friendly with a class mate who does it well, maybe try holding her hands and do it together to feel her rhythmn.

Share this post


Link to post
Claude_Catastrophique

There's no secret, I just practiced a lot :huh: Jokes aside. I really practiced a lot with the help of the barre and I really leaned onto the barre and just worked feet and legs, no upper body, just to get the lower part alright. Then I did them slowly in center (I mean, jump - beat - land - take a break - think - jump and so on) and analized how it worked best and I found out, that I really have to turn out my legs - especially the one that beats - in the air and that I have to beat from the knees up to the inner tighs and that the movement is extremly small. Other than that I concentrate on the upper body and arms. STrong upper body and correct arms help me coordinate better so that it is easier to beat. And I absolutely do not think about feet. As soon as I start to think about beating my feet or so I start to sickle, I do not pointe anymore and I knot my legs :sweating:

 

Maybe I am off timing...I experience that a lot in modern with jumps that my teacher jumps with me and I always have the impression, that we are too fast (but we are not)

Share this post


Link to post
Victoria Leigh

Claude, it sounds like you may not have learned to do beats properly, if you are thinking about one of the legs doing the beat. When a step includes a battu, it must be done by both legs equally. The beat itself has to rebound to be visible, and that does not work with one leg doing the beating. For instance, try an entrechat quatre thinking of the front leg doing the beating. What will happen is that that leg will turn in to beat if the other leg is not working equally, and of course there would be no rebound of the legs following the beat.

 

It also sounds to me, like Balletlove said, that your problem has something to do with timing and rebound. However, those elements could be hampered by attempting to beat with one leg. :huh:

Share this post


Link to post
luceroblanco

Maybe you can't explain it here, but how do you teach beats?? In my beginner classes sometimes we have to do beats, but I don't really know how to do them. I do something that looks like a beat (I think)--in other words I fake it. I have asked my teacher about when we would LEARN how to do beats but got no response on that one. (Usually he/she is very good at responding to queries about steps). Is this something you would teach at the barre? on the floor?

Share this post


Link to post
Victoria Leigh

On the floor. Lying down. Put legs straight up in the air, cross them, bend knees and flex feet to make a demi plié in 5th. Push legs straight up pointing feet, open legs, beat legs, open legs, close to 5th plié. Do slowly at first, then a little quicker. This teaches you to beat the legs, not the feet, and to work both legs equally.

 

The first beat to learn standing up would be an échappé battu. The reason for that is that the jump to second opens the legs for you, providing an easier beat from the open position. (Don't use a big second.) The legs should switch after the beat, for instance, if you start with your right foot front, jump to second, the beat could either be right leg in front and close in back, or, right leg in back and close in front, depending on whether you want the échappé to be changé or not.

 

I would never teach beats facing the barre. If you have a corner where two barres meet, or a portable barre to make parallel with a wall barre, or two portable barres of the same height, this works best. Support yourself on your arms, standing between the barres. Plié, push up, open legs and cross to beat, open legs and then close to plié 5th. You can also stay up there a while and do several beats, but always make sure that the beats rebound so that there is a small opening of the legs before and after the beat.

 

Another way to practice them is in a swimming pool. :grinning:

Share this post


Link to post
dancepig
Another way to practice them is in a swimming pool. biggrin.gif

 

Oh - yea! I can do these really well in the pool!

Share this post


Link to post
addy
Another way to practice them is in a swimming pool. biggrin.gif

 

Oh - yea! I can do these really well in the pool!

 

 

I tried beats in the pool the other day. I found them difficult jumping up and down in the shallow end because the water resistance was making me jump sort of sideways.

 

But then I tried them in the deep end and practicing the back-forth motion was great.

 

I also practiced articulating my feet on landing from jumps in the shallow end- toe/ball/heel & heel/ball/toe etc. It was very difficult because it was in slow motion but I thought it was a very good exercise for coordination. I plan to practice that some more. I think if I could get really good at that in the water it might really help me articulate my feet on land.

 

I also tried some medium allegro like glissade and assemblé but it was hopeless.

 

I also bought a secondhand book that I saw discussed on this sight (thank you) called "Water Beauty Book" by Allegra Kent. It is out of print and very expensive if in good condtion. I got it for $35 (very used) but it won't arrive unti Novemeber. I am really looking forward to it.

Share this post


Link to post
Claude_Catastrophique

Maybe I did not express myself properly (not being a native speaker). I mean the leg that brushes out, like it does in assemblés and jetés. If I think of beating both legs equally when the jump is not started and ended the same like it does in entrechat quatre I am ending up overcrossing everywhere where it is possible :sweating: Doesn't it happen automatically that you beat both legs? I cannot imagine how you can beat just one...

 

Also entrechat quatre in row or other beaten jumps from two legs to two legs I am totally fine with.

 

But thanks everyone for your answers.

Share this post


Link to post
Arirhen
On 13/10/2010 at 3:46 PM, Victoria Leigh said:

Support yourself on your arms, standing between the barres. Plié, push up, open legs and cross to beat, open legs and then close to plié 5th. You can also stay up there a while and do several beats, but always make sure that the beats rebound so that there is a small opening of the legs before and after the beat.

I have been scouring the forums for tips to help me with my problem of beats and I found a lot of helpful information here.  

I seem to be doing pretty well now with échappé battu after your suggestions of going from second position, beating the legs, then returning back to second position.

I am, however, having trouble transitioning from doing a battu from 5th to 5th away from the two parallel barres. I think it is called an entrechat. When I am between the barres I obviously have the luxury of suspending myself in their air for a second to feel that nice beat. However, when I am away from the barre I just don't feel like I am getting it.

My questions are:

How much time do you usually give your students to practice between the two barres before moving them in the centre? I will have to continue practicing this at home, so I would love to know how often I should practice and for how long to make sure I am giving my muscle memory adequate time to learn.

Is there any in between step you can recommend? Maybe going from 5th, beating behind and landing in second?

I hope I am making sense, ballet is a language in itself.

Share this post


Link to post

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×