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balletmom13

home school time?

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BalletValet

Do you all notice a trend of more and more ballet programs moving towards daytime programs that necessitate the dancers to homeschool or take online classes?  I used to think this was only for older high school aged dancers in the highest levels of a school (16-18 year olds) but it seems to have moved down to all high school (14+ year olds) and sometimes even younger.  In our large metro area, the company affiliated ballet school has a daytime program and the students are typically high schoolers with the exception of a handful of younger dancers.  There are some local pre-pro schools that also have daytime programs with students of all ages.  Of course, all the dancers in these daytime programs have to qualify and be asked to attend.  But it seems more and more dancers are joining these daytime programs and homeschooling — I suppose to keep up with the competition?  

If we’re going by the BT4D guidelines for training, couldn’t those ballet classes all be taken after school?  What are they doing during the daytime hours that couldn’t be done after school?  

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ballet1310

Balletvalet - some of the truly professional schools do have day time classes but local schools doing it ... not necessary in my opinion - the classes can be taken after school and when the student is really ready for more serious training, then they will have to figure out that schedule - I do see a trend of schools calling themselves “ pre-pro” not sure what their criteria is for that and i think  some are mis-leading ...

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balletmom13

our school going to day program this coming Fall, I have mixed feelings about it. I think it will be easier in some ways, but having my DD miss out on some regular HS has been a very hard decision. 

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ballet1310

balletmom13 - it's hard... my dd had to online school because she commutes  - the question for us was, is a professional career possible ... we realized the answer is yes so we did it .  Having said that though, even if someone is not going to be a professional ( because of course there are no guarantees and who knows what the future holds)  there is really no right or wrong, just what's best for your child.  Also, she can always go back to a regular high school if it doesn't work out , nothing is ever final !!

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Noodles

BalletValet, my DD is in a daytime program and for me it is a total game changer! I love that we are all home in the evening rather than out in traffic, that we can all relax and enjoy dinner together and when time allows a tv show or movie.

As for the benefit to the dancer, I think there are many. For my DD, she is fresh when she goes into class....she has not already had a long day of brain drain and she is focused. Another big benefit is that her daytime class is smaller than her evening classes and the dancers get more individual attention and are progressing beautifully.

My DD was already doing an independent academic program so the switch to online in order to accommodate dance was an easy transition. Now during the afternoon and evening she is home doing school work and I feel like I am a normal person who can make dinner for my family,  go out with my husband and spend my time on household stuff rather than in my car.

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Noodles

balletmom13, I think the important question is how does your DD feel about missing out on the traditional HS experience? My daughter is adamant that dancing is far more important (to her) than attending a football game or a dance, etc. In fact she has access to both of those thru her online school, because they have a brick and mortar component, but she choses to skip them anyway. 

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nynydancer

After resisting DD's pleas for independent study for DD at the start of the year, but we switched in January and it's a life saver.  She still does math at her middle school.  It was definitely the right thing to do.  To DD's point, she wasn't a normal student anyways.  She was doing homework through breaks and working in such a focused manner in class, her peers thought she was a weirdo anyways.  Dances and after school stuff is out of the question anyways.  I guess for some of these dancers, a typical school experience isn't even possible even if they try.

 

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cclw

Thanks for the mention of Laurel Springs. I had looked at it online but had not spoken to anyone who had used it.  I'll investigate it further. 

Do any of you who are happy with your state-sponsored programs know whether the state uses the K12 curriculum? I'm looking at some of the K12 private school options right now, among other things. Our state has a program that my daughter used for math in middle school, when she had exceeded the middle school math offerings, but it was not very good at all. If she is attending online school she still wants to have at least some classes that meet through skype or something similar, rather than doing a completely independent study on her own. 

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Monet

My DD did they cyber school that was attached to the high school in our district.  She was able to do it from out of state and since it was a public high school there was no cost.  It may be worth checking if the school she is currently attending offers an onlie/cyber option for their students.  Also let me add (I think I have posted this before) I would not recommend taking a student out of traditional school unless totally necessary.  We really had no other option.  Also if your DD is not planning on a professional dance career but college I would definitely consider staying in school.  Online is definitely something that can be done even with advanced/AP/honors classes but it is a great amount of work and dedication.  But I will say having an online option was very helpful, not idea but helpful to my DD.  

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cclw

Monet, thanks for the advice, but I am pretty confident that we aren't going to keep her in her current school. We live in an area where there are many homeschoolers, and if I had the time to do it I might try that, but am looking for an online alternative. We really aren't happy with her current school, which is a private school and therefore does not offer an online option. The commute is insane, and she is spending too many hours a week dancing, in addition to the commute and school time.  She's not thriving, physically  or academically any more.  If there were a closer school that met her needs, we'd look into that; she's actually put herself into the lottery for a small magnet program, but other than that there just aren't a lot of good choices. 

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Monet

It's tough when there is lack of choices and that is why we had to choose online.  I can encourage you by saying there are many options out there.  My friends DD does a k12 program and it has worked really well.  Also we hired a tutor so our DD had an actual human to go over things with if needed and that was very helpful.  Also let me encourage you by saying our DD was able to even do AP, advance and honors classes so getting some really great and challenging classes is definitely possible.  Best wishes!  

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dancemom02

cclw, my DD does a mix of brick and mortar (mostly) supplemented with a few online classes.  I did a ton of research, talked to various folk, and then decided on the ala carte approach.  While I have heard good things about Laurel Springs - their courses are UC approved and the course syllibi I reviewed looked reasonably rigorous -  they are very pricey and I couldn't find anywhere that their outcomes are any different than other online providers I looked at.  "X% of our test takers get 3 or better on AP exams."  But when I asked what percentage get 4 or 5s, it was crickets.  So we went with the less expensive Keystone, which is a private K-12 provider.  But with Keystone, there is next to no interaction. The teacher - and I use this term VERY loosely - for one of the courses was responsive to questions, but another never responded to any of my daughter's inquiries.  The benefit is that she can work at her own pace, but she is, essentially, her own teacher using their provided materials.  One positive is that both courses require/d a lot of writing.  Not a positive from a work-load point of view, but the practice is good and her writing is actually improving.  But just from practice, not because she gets any feedback from Keystone.  So DD has taken only their standard level courses that fulfill requirements, but that aren't at the top of her favorite subjects list.

Her other online courses are from various online providers in our state, which is very home/online school friendly.  Some of these (free) providers use K12, some Edgenuity, and some Schmoop.  None of them provide human interaction.  So she keeps to brick and mortar for her AP classes and takes online classes for requirements she can't fit into her abbreviated academic day.

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learningdance

DD does Laurel Springs.  For an online program we find it rigorous. She takes honors and it sure does keep her busy.  Her situation would have permitted a bricks and mortar + online but the bricks and mortar was so weak and she has to attend classes in the morning so she would be hauling back and forth constantly. 

I am not really a big fan of online schooling.  It checks the box but it doesn't really offer the rich, truly amazing parts of education. 

It takes A LOT of discipline on her part and I have to really be on top of things.  I create a work plan for her  for each week based on what's due because we were finding that she was not working ahead but just kind of sitting down to the computer each day and doing what was due that day and that did not work because some units were really intended to be completed in 6 + hours.  We've gotten a handle on how long things take.  

She is a really strong student and likes learning but just tends to want to drag things out. . . things don't get done. So our policy is that everything due in a week must be completed by Sun of that week. 

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Eligus

Homeschooling was (IMO) the absolute BEST option (as far as time for my DD, freedom of the schedule and rigor of the studies were concerned).  It was, however, expensive in both money and my time, energy and effort. 

We wound up cyber schooling for high school (and part of middle school) mainly because my DD and I were struggling a bit with our relationship once she hit the teenage years.  She would resent the school work load assigned, and I would resent her complaints about something that required a great deal of effort on my part.  Starting at about 13yo, it was better for our relationship for a 3rd party outside the family to assign and "grade" the school work. 

I still continued setting up her schedule for a few years, as Learningdance also does.  I also had to let her "fail" (or at least really stumble) a number of times before she figured out how she had to work to succeed.  I also found it VERY helpful to hire a tutor for a few classes that were not her strong suit (chemistry, for sure).  Yes, the private tutor was expensive, but worth every penny for her to have easy access to a teacher.  My DD found it hard to really understand a topic and have a one on one discussion over the computer.  Plus, chemistry is not MY strong suit, so it was a win-win for both of us. 

I started by research with my state's department of education website, and wound up choosing a cyber school that had a physical building in my state that I could drive to and talk to a person face to face (if I needed to do that).  I'm happy to share details of which school we landed on via PM.

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DanceMumNYC

nynydancer- do you mind sharing which program you used? Was it an online public school? I ask because you mentioned your dd took math at a middle school. I didn't know that students could be schooled at home or online and still attend public schools for some of their classes. That sounds pretty ideal.

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