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Trainee /2nd Company Article

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ballet1310

Momof3darlings thank you so much for taking the time to compile the links,  I will take a night and go through all of it ...  Your insight and advice is very much appreciated. I will also make my comments in those threads :)   Everyone's comments are very helpful - I agree looking into bio's is a good way to see who is getting promoted.  I find a lot of the big schools also recruit dancers in later years and it may seem as if the dancer was trained there but really, they were mostly trained elsewhere.  All good food for thought as next season we will be casting the net wide and seeing where she lands.

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learningdance

cat11, 

Yep. . .

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learningdance

And thanks for the links. .. read through many of these. . . 

I have a question: Is the unpaid trainee or tuition-based trainee common in European countries? 

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Toitoi43

learning dance, I will try to answer the questions about unpaid/tuition-based trainees in Europe.  Like the states, Europe has some schools whose students are called trainees.  They are part of the school and yes they do participate in some company productions where a large corps is necessary.  The highest level at schools range from being called Academy, Trainee, Upper School, etc.  Some companies are really good about promoting from their school but it seems that more times than not, kids are brought into the upper levels from competitions and scouting.  In Europe, there isn't a "trainee" level between school and company.  Hope that helps a little although after reading over this, it sounds very similar to what is happening in the states.

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learningdance

Toitoi 
 

So my DD was talking with a dancer who did a stint in Europe and is now in a large co in the US at a soloist level.  It was this dancer's perception that European companies did not have the expectation that parents from Europe fund trainee or unpaid internships. It was this dancer's perception that some European companies thought that American parents were more open/willing to fund  unpaid interships than European parents, who are used to a state-run system. 

I guess I wonder about your perceptions? 

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Momof3darlings

Sort of apples to oranges instead of apples to apples.  Not so much that American parents are more open/willing to pay, but basically, that is the system we have in place because of our love for free choice for our children.  We don't like other people telling us how to parent or what our children can or cannot do in terms of limits.  Most of us would not go for a ballet only road from childhood on.  Nor do we generally want our children to be limited in the way attending a state run program might.  Not saying either is bad or good.   Just saying that it may be apples to oranges to compare in the manner that dancer's perceptions sent her.  It would be alot easier on the art form possibly.  But we tend to function here on a belief that every child can do whatever they want in whatever manner they choose.  We'd have to completely overhaul the American belief system to have the same perceptions as those who live under state run programs for most art forms and sport.  

 

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Toitoi43

I completely agree with Momof3darlings.  Because a lot of the education is funded by the state in Europe, parents have little to no say.  It also seems a lot more black and white.  You either get accepted to the good training programs or you don't. If you don't, you can't "pay to play."  As for unpaid internships, I don't think they are the norm.  If they do exist, there is a strict two-year minimum policy.  It does seem like more companies have second companies or junior companies but the majority pay something to the dancer.

 

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learningdance

Thanks momof3. . helpful and Toi, toi

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