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  1. Today
  2. balletgoober

    Balancé En Tournant

    Hi, I emailed my teacher and they are down, up, up.
  3. vrsfanatic

    Balancé En Tournant

    Please double check as the two movements are quite different
  4. Hello, I'm new here but need some help from fellow members. It's my DD first time at SAB. She's in an upper level this summer. She only knows of one girl, in her level, to get asked for Winter Term. She hasn't heard of any girls above her level getting asked. I know the posts above stated that girls get asked every week, but do you think SAB just isn't taking any older girls this summer? My daughter is 15 and is in Level VI.
  5. Yesterday
  6. balletgoober

    Balancé En Tournant

    @vrsfanatic , i believe that today in class we were doing them down, up, up!
  7. vrsfanatic

    Balancé En Tournant

    There are two ways to do them. Can you tell me if you do them down, up, down or down, up, up. With this information, I might be able to clarify the movement a bit.
  8. balletgoober

    Balancé En Tournant

    This week in class we’ve really been working on balancés en tournant, and they’re so confusing! I’ve done them before but not in a long time. Does anyone have any general advice on improving them?
  9. Last week
  10. Miss Persistent

    UNCSA High School Academics

    This topic has been moved to Higher Education General Discussion
  11. VerdantConfessions

    UNCSA High School Academics

    Specific numbers and data regarding high school academics and college acceptances is located on their website under the high school profile section. It even includes a downloadable version of the high school bulletin, with a description of each and every class offered there. The data shows the students who attend are just as talented academically as they are artistically! Top academic scores. Like most other schools, counselors are available with increased focus on 11th and 12th graders to help prepare them for college. Many high school dance (ballet) majors go on to study at colleges in a field completely unrelated to ballet. It's a common occurrence! I know for locals in the Triad area, there is an urban legend that academics are an after thought and not at all rigorous, but that couldn't be further from the truth. To be quite frank, I personally know of someone first hand who was academically dismissed from the high school. Even when applying to the high school, students are to provide transcripts/report cards, test scores, and report their GPA. Students must re-submit their final transcripts before being officially admitted and given their academic schedule in the fall. Also, applicants have to have an academic letter of recommendation (in addition to an artistic letter of recommendation) and write and submit an essay serving as their artistic statement. High school candidates have to be strong artistically AND academically and once admitted that strength must be maintained.
  12. Now is the time. It is really clear to me, someone many years past where you are, that now is the time. We did leave our non-competition, serious pre-pro ballet school for 2 years and my daughter only did ballet 3 days a week from age 12-14. It was a glorious time during which her confidence improved and she became a sparkling, joyous child again. Then she wanted to go back. I should have never allowed her to subject herself and by proxy, me to those toxic, damaged, and harmful teachers, kids, and parents again. If I had to do it over again, I would have run the other way but you only know what you know when you know it. So be warned that switching to a serious pre-pro ballet school will likely be just as toxic. I can tell you this, my youngest is a very talented baseball player and my experience with my eldest in ballet makes navigating the world of rec, school, and travel ball very easy for me. This time around, I approach every single decision with only one outcome in mind… will this experience contribute to or enhance my child’s self-esteem, life experience, and/or growth without harm? If the answer is no, we don’t do it. Many people will tell you, “That’s just life.” “That’s part of growing up.” “You (or your kid) are too sensitive.” “Life isn’t fair.” “It’s not good to coddle your kid.” “Quitting doesn’t teach your child anything.” “You (or your child) need to develop resilience/have thicker skin/not take things personally.” Or they will try to make you doubt yourself as though you have some kind of severely warped perception and are misreading the situation or they will use some other version of this garbage they tell themselves to make themselves feel better about their decisions and victim shame you and/or your child. I do not believe that suffering, pain, and exposure to toxic people (let’s be clear here… toxic is just a word we use because we are afraid to say abuse/abusive) are necessary for growth and development. In fact, constant exposure to these kinds of people and this kind of environment creates trauma. Let me say that again, it creates trauma… Real and enduring wounds and damage to one’s soul. Nothing is worth that. Find a place that is a healthy and has an encouraging environment that celebrates each child’s gifts. If that isn’t possible, find an activity that isn’t filled with narcissistic and abusive people. But whatever you do, don’t stay there and pay people to harm your children. There is no need to twist yourself into knots trying to figure out a way to endure this. There is nothing your children can gain from this environment that is worth the harm they will be exposed to. i agree with redirecting your kids, with a let’s try something new/fun/exciting/different approach and make leaving a positive thing for them. Trust me when I say that leaving WILL be a positive thing for all of you.
  13. DTCB.dancewave.org “Dancing through college and beyond” went online last year and I highly recommend it for college seniors. It appears it will remain online. Although my graduated dd is attending a college that was not at DTCB, it was an extremely helpful and cost effective way to find out about dozens of different college dance programs - and she was given partial scholarships to a couple of places. There were a few sessions for parents, and for students information sessions with many colleges (where dd was able to ask questions directly of admissions officers, and learned so much more than she could find out on websites). The program is available to all high school dancers, but only seniors are allowed to the audition (which last year were standardized to one recording/submission for all the colleges to view, not sure what will be the case this year).
  14. @AlwaysMore2Learn sounds exactly like my daughter who is now 17 and is in the process of applying to colleges for ballet. She turned hip hopper to ballet dancer at age 13.
  15. ascballerina

    Training Too Much?

    Just a reminder there is no need to quote the post directly above yours! I fixed it for you this time. Please do keep us updated on the outcome of your meeting!
  16. I have a lot of empathy for the original poster on this thread. My DD (just about to turn 13!) went through some very similar experiences. We didn't know a thing about dance, so we took her to the closest local studio when she was 3 and asking for ballet classes. We ended up on a merry-go-round of competitions & conventions where there seemed to be no real breaks and constant pressure to win meaningless titles. It was okay for awhile in spite of the same issues described regarding studio darlings who seemed to operate on a different set of rules & resources than the rest of us. The reason it worked for awhile was that my DD and I spent countless hours before and after competitions talking about what did and didn't actually matter to her. She learned to set her own goals, work towards them, and evaluate her progress without reference to others or to scores. She learned how to pick a space in a crowded class where she could work comfortably, and she grew fearless in the face of auditions and judges. Right around the time that she turned 11 she decided that she really wanted to pursue a potential career in dance and that the training she was getting wouldn't cut it. We went directly to the studio owner and her main teacher to let them know she was thinking about a change. We honored all of her commitments, did a lot of research, started to take her for master classes and auditions for pre-pros, and finally made a full switch at the end of that comp season with the full support of her long-time teachers (I think it really helped that they were not blindsided.) Many previous conversations with these teachers had resulted in the kind of defensive replies the OP describes above. It turned out to be much easier to just state that DD needed something completely different and that we would like their help to find it. Now my DD is immersed in the world of classical ballet. She is doing her first away SI right now! She has never been happier with dance. The biggest lesson we've taken away from her experience is to recognize and be grateful for the lessons she's learned along the way. She has a growth mindset and resilience from her years of competing, and rather than regretting that she started out on that path we are just glad for the positive takeaways and grateful we were able to make a change when she was ready for it. Wishing you and your dancer all the very best, @JCmom11!
  17. Our studio is very successful in competitions locally and internationally. The students do however radically reduce their participation as they get older e.g. 12 up They are fortunate in that they do have performance opportunities (well pre-Covid) but basically they buckle down and do the work I also enjoy comps and believe that people in the Performing Arts should seek out performance opportunities - but it is also clear that the competition is yourself. How to be better NOT how to get a place from some random adjudicator - who isn't even auditioning you for a real opportunity. I would also say that it is the teacher not the school. In a small town there may be a great teacher that is ideal for your children at this point. Even at the Bolshoi Ballet Academy students seek out external coaches! The elite coach in this student's blog said: Do not choose a school, you should choose a teacher https://balletschooldropout.wordpress.com/2016/11/27/why-i-didnt-stay-in-moscow/
  18. balletgoober

    Training Too Much?

    We have a student-teacher meeting before the beginning of the year, so I will bring it up then
  19. vrsfanatic

    Training Too Much?

    balletgoober, have you discussed your thoughts with a teacher you trust? It may be best to include your teacher is your thought process.
  20. balletgoober

    Training Too Much?

    Thank you for taking the time to answer my question! Yes without a doubt, quality > quantity.. I always work my hardest in all of my classes & make sure that i’m recovering quality training first and foremost. However i’m considering dropping a few hours, because as you said, balance is important! I appreciate your feedback & words.
  21. 😄 I would caution you that the parenting difficulties are not just a gender thing. Your children are at the starting age of when everything gets more difficult to navigate (socially and emotionally). Middle school years are very, very hard on everyone. But, after raising three girls, I do know what you are feeling. You are in the right place if you wish to find more information about ballet from serious-minded aficionados, fans, dancers and parents. This forum has a wealth of information on finding "pre pro" schools (if your children want to continue ballet specifically). I would search for a pre-professional ballet school in your area and have your children take a drop in class or two to get a feel for how different ballet training is from "dance" training. Some kids love it, others can't stand it. I know you said you were in a small town, but there might be a more serious ballet studio near by. My guess is that you may be unaware of the existence of more serious ballet training studios because they may not participate in the competitive dance world. Go ahead and search through the forums for a pre pro school around your geographic area to see what may be near you. If your children aren't interested in ballet, specifically, I would think about theater (which can include singing, acting and dancing) and satisfy the performance need. If they like competition, but want more team participation, gymnastics or swimming are great sports. I've also known some dancers who were figure skaters, and found the performance aspect of figure skating fulfilling. My dancer (when she was younger) really enjoyed horseback riding (hunter-jumper). The good thing about the age your children are is that they are usually enthusiastic about trying new things! Take advantage of that, and have fun exploring what else they might be interested in trying. If you do choose to leave the current dance studio, I would try to do so with a fun/easy attitude of trying new and different activities, rather than an angry/frustrated one. This is a great lesson to teach your kids by example... "We have outlived the fun/joy this activity used to bring, let's try something new and interesting."
  22. vrsfanatic

    UNCSA Preparatory Dance Program

    Please ask your questions publically in case others may also have the same questions.
  23. VerdantConfessions

    UNCSA Preparatory Dance Program

    I'm not allowed to message you either 😕
  24. Thank you. I appreciate all the feedback it does put things in to prospective on things. In honesty was just trying to give a perspective that my kiddos aren't bad or me being the blinded parent of children that should try something else. They show up, they love their friends, they do work hard and they have been dedicated to this team since they were tiny tots. Unfortunately things like that don't matter anymore. Yes there are children that can do no wrong and no mine are not perfect. If there was an issue with one of them you could a conversion with me WOULD have absolutely been the correct thing to do so I could try to correct the issue. They love it because it's all they know, I'm simply tired of watching them get disappointed. As for a conversation, I've had them, well some what. I'm not able to speak much. if you even in the most kind way you ask why the response is don't tell us how to run our business. They get very argumentative and go on the defense. There is no listening to how something makes you feel. Also no one have ever stated to me they were not a fan of competitive dance and that it's actually an art. I REALLY Appreciate that actually. The past few days I have realized this is a huge world with so many opportunities and we have revolved around this one place their entire childhood. If anyone has any suggestions to branch out and expand their art please let me know. What do you do, where do you go? How to you find different things. We got in to this simply by signing up my oldest one for ballet classes at 3. (Pretty much what most of us do when we have little girls). And it morphed in to this beast of an expense. I'm not a typical dance mom honestly never expected to be in this world it just happened. The studio has become a competition within the competitions. From the moms that push for everything to the ones that sit there all night ready to brown nose any chance they can. That's not me, I'm old fashioned, show up be there, work hard but that's not how it goes anymore. The parents compete as much as the children and thats a game I'm not interested in. I gave statistics simply because anyway I look at it I don't understand. Its poor business and I appreciate the feedback. They have permanent bliners on and I will take much more then just us walking away for any change to happen. It's just a small studio in a small town. IF anyone has any input on how to branch them out and find new things please keep up the conversation. I always said I should have been the parent of boys. This girl thing is hard.
  25. vrsfanatic

    Training Too Much?

    balletgoober it is wonderful to such an enthusiast new member, but I must say the number of hours one studies dance is not as important as the quality of the teaching and the way a student approaches work. The work must be done correctly. That being said, our residential students carry a physical schedule of 5 to 6 hours a day of physical dance classes 5 days a week with an extra 1.5 hrs. to 3 hrs. on Saturdays. Those classes include ballet technique, pointe, variations, partnering, character, jazz, modern and spanish dance. There is one 1 hour 45 minute ballet technique class 5 days a week followed by a 45 min to an hour class of either pointe, variations, men's work or partnering. They then have 2.5 hours of repetoire rehearsals daily. They also study music, mordern or jazz or pilates twice a week for an 1.50 hours. Saturdays is the day for charcter dance and character repetoire. Depending upon level, it could be anywhere from 1.5 hours to 3 hours. Our school provides a pilates reformer that they use as needed on their own time. Our school is a residential ballet high school program allowing the students many hours of professional training. When I do the math, it seems they have anywhere from 30 to 33 hours of mandatory physical dance classes in total depending on the level of the student. It is a quite a heavy load an must be monitored by the dance faculty to make sure no one is doing too much work for their physical abilities. Balance is important because over training can indeed lead to burn out, but also injury. I hope this has been helpful. Just love your enthusiasm!😊
  26. balletgoober

    Training Too Much?

    I'm a 15 year old male, currently taking 20 hours of class a week (men's class, mixed technique, contemporary, jazz, pilates + yoga) + 15 hours rehearsal/yagp coaching. I'm also in the athletic training program at my high school, which is geared toward serious student athletes. There's a lot of plyometrics, cardio, bodyweight exercises, etc. with some weight training, but not enough to make me bulky. Is this too much? The class at my school is an hour long, 5 days/wk. I also start every day with 30 min of pilates on my own. I started quite late (12) so of course I need to work harder to stay on top of everything. Burnout has never been an issue for me, I've never entered a class feeling tired or anything negative. Just excited to learn & work hard. Sometimes it's difficult to stay on top of schoolwork, but I've never let my grade slip. However, I've read a lot of stories, here and elsewhere, about kids who did burnout, and as a result, quit dancing... I know that I have the hunger to learn, + energy... But should I cut back before I head down the wrong path?
  27. Thank you! That’s awesome. I will look forward to feedback on the school year
  28. Redbookish

    Tombe pas de bourree en pointe?

    The other thing you might do is look at some of the wonderful clips of professional dancers on places such as YouTube. You'll see the variety of choreography and styles.
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