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  1. Yesterday
  2. RandomDancer

    Frustrating Alignment Issues

    No, I don’t. I used to though.
  3. mom2

    Canada's changing marijuana laws

    From the Toronto Star, a coast-to-coast guide: Cannabis laws across Canada
  4. mom2

    Canada's changing marijuana laws

    Hello everyone, We thought that you'd like to be aware, if you are not already, that effective tomorrow (October 17, 2018) marijuana will be legal in Canada. In broad terms this means that someone 18 or older will be able to legally purchase from a licensed source. The minimum age may be older in Quebec. There will be limits as to quantities, and rules are different it seems across the provinces in terms of where one is allowed to smoke. Edibles will not be sold legally for about another year (unlike in some US states, such as Colorado). Here is a link to a government of Canada page with some information. I will also be posting links to news articles. As this is very new, there is still information unfolding. We hope this will help inform your discussions with family, dance schools and companies in Canada. http://Government of Canada re marijuana legislation
  5. Victoria Leigh

    Not pointing feet throughout routines

    Welcome to Ballet Talk for Dancers, LouLouLou. Ballet1310 is correct. Young dancers of your DD's age do not yet have the strength and coordination to maintain technique throughout a combination in the center, much less a "routine". This is especially true of those who have grown quickly, and have long legs. Even with "banana" feet, they cannot yet get the energy all the way through the legs to the feet when in constant motion.
  6. Victoria Leigh

    Should I quit dance?

    Criadancer, come back to us when you have had the talk with your teacher. Keep in mind, though, that while ballet is not a career option for everyone, it can still be something you love and enjoy doing. A very small percentage of young dancers will achieve professional status, but they dance because that is what they love to do.
  7. Hello

    Improving Plié

    Miss Leigh, Thanks for your advice a lot, I will try this next time I do a pile. Hello
  8. Victoria Leigh

    Improving Plié

    Yes, Hello, there is, and it is quite simple! As you begin to bend your knees you need to feel like you are going UP....NOT DOWN! Bending the knees is not a downward movement of the body. The entire torso should resist upward. Even in a grand plié! The body will not "slouch" if you are busy lengthening upwards.
  9. Yes, very good, I usually check her work on YouTube, if you type in her name and Character Dance it will take you to her account and video samples. And yes, you can follow all the exercises because she explains all of the details thoroughly.
  10. Hello

    Improving Plié

    I always slouch and can't keep my back straight when I do a deeper demi pile. But my teacher just told me not to do it too deep at first but I still want to improve. Any exercise I can work on it?
  11. ballet1310

    Not pointing feet throughout routines

    Hi louloulou, it takes years of correct training to maintain the strength for many many things in ballet - patience and time is all you need right now ...
  12. Mom de deux

    Nutcracker 2018

    Well much to everyone's surprise, (but DD14's neverending delight) she not only got Arabian lead, she got it for both casts, which almost never happens. (The only other lead that wasn't split cast was SPF.) She also got some other nice roles (Snow and flowers corps, one of the mechanical dolls at the party), but this was the one she has been working and hoping for since she was 5. The only drawback is that some of the older dancers are extremely unhappy with their casting and as DD put it, they are "draining all the joy out of everyone else." I think that will pass though, and at least it doesn't seem to be dampening her spirits.
  13. Hello all! What a great forum this is, very insightful and so much information. I am very new to the dance world, my 9 year old daughter only recently started dancing (just over 18 months now). She has progressed incredibly well, has wonderful flexibility, and has been made a member of the comp/elite team at the beginning of this year. She is very tall for her age, with gorgeous long legs. However I think the length of her legs proves to be a hindrance at times, with her legs kind of controlling her rather than the other way around. She adores ballet, and apparently has "good feet" - she is often told how lucky she is that they are beautiful banana shaped (can you tell I know nothing about dance?!?!) Her problem is this. While she has stunning legs and feet, while performing routines (she does a lyrical and a contemporary solo), she seems to forget to maintain the point. She will go into a kick, or a leap, and her feet will be pointed at the beginning, go flat in the middle of the move, then will point again when she hits the top of the move. Is there any exercise or way to help her to remember to maintain her point throughout the entire performance, or does this just come with practice? Any tips appreciated, as she is so eager to learn and practices constantly, but cant seem to overcome this!
  14. Last week
  15. criadancer

    Should I quit dance?

    Hello, I'm 15 and I'm thinking that this upcoming Nutcracker may be my last. I've been dancing since I was 7 and I although I love it more than anything else, I feel I cannot continue. I am very inflexible, don't have good turnout, and have a lot of fear while doing certain steps (like turns en pointe and triple jazz turns). My body just wasn't made for dance and all the issues I mentioned mean that I cannot do ballet professionally. I wanted to quit last season as well, and it broke my teacher's heart. We talked for a long time and she mentioned that although I can't do ballet, I have other options. I tried to explore them, but ballet is really the only thing I want to do. I feel lost thinking I won't have dance, and my family won't either as it's brought us all together. I just can't continue to try work towards something that isn't achievable, even though I'm terrified of having to find something else to do. I also don't think my family can continue to afford dance and I don't want to keep wasting money on it. Should I quit? And if I do quit, how do I break it to everyone the second time? How do I get my family to believe this is really the end? I'm having a talk with my teacher this week about career options and possibly quitting. I'll let you all know what she says and what I end up doing.
  16. Well I think, no, I know I was overreacting. They are using it as a tool. I spoke with my DD about it, and she said "that sounds really cool, especially if they can help me fix something, rather than a teacher just saying 'fix your shoulders!' then walking away."
  17. ascballerina

    A Reintroduction

    There was a joke in the teacher training program that we had "non-dancer bodies being asked to do dancer things" (re: the injury rate). Truth is, everyone's body has something, and it's about how you learn to work with it that helps you progress in your career. I've often explained to people that physios are where you go after you've hurt yourself, and you get your "antibiotics" there, wheras the work I do is more like vitamins that you take to prevent getting sick--or after you do get sick in the interest of not getting sick again. No worries--I enjoy talking about my work! The problem-solving is what makes it fun. ^.^
  18. Eligus

    A Reintroduction

    Thank you! That general introduction is exactly what I've been looking for!! I find this stuff fascinating -- especially the details you've shared about your own personal frustration and solution search, since I find it inspiring when dancers see and talk about the fact that no one's body is "perfect." The fact that you and others are willing to attack problems head on and search for a workable solution encourages others to do the same. It's easy to become discouraged in this profession, so (in my opinion) it's helpful when problems are addressed objectively and with an unrelenting enthusiasm to fix the underlying issues, rather than the symptoms. Again, forgive me for glomming onto your re-introduction post, but thank you so much for sharing a piece of your journey!! For what it is worth, I really do feel like you've started down a path of study that will explode with usefulness in the future, as we learn more and more about how the body actually works.
  19. ascballerina

    A Reintroduction

    Hey Eligus, Here is a link that describes some of the elements of the work, although in the context of the workshop for teachers: https://www.merrithew.com/instructor-training/fascial-movement/courses. It recommends this textbook, which is actually an easy read and not that long. There are some cadaver pictures but even with my phobia I was ok with what was shown: Fascia: What it is and Why it Matters by David Lesondak Merrithew Fascial Movement is based on some of the latest research, and I've been incoprorating it into my Pilates work as well. Merrithew also has the Zen-ga brand, which does include fascial work and was the basis of my beginning exploration in the field (first as a student, then as an instructor), but Fascial Movement is /very/ different from anything I have taught before, and I've been getting good results from both just Fascial Movement and also a blend of the fascial work I've been exploring over the years. I treat things on a case-by-case basis. What's interesting is that rather than "principles", we have "variables", such as Bounce, and then you learn a whole bunch of ways to achieve that variable. I do a lot of Injuries and Special Populations work, and I have a particular focus on dancers when I can get them. I actually do a lot of work with dancers from rec schools in the area, and I do sometimes have the opportunity to teach a class to professional dancers/students, but their schedules are so packed sometimes it is difficult for them to come. I tend to use a blend of Merrithew work (STOTT PILATES, Zen-ga, Fascial Movement) with all my clients, and that arises from both the fact that my local instructor trainer does things that way, and also my own rehab journey, as I discovered a lot of the "tightness" I was feeling while stretching was fascial rather than muscular, so working with the fascia helped me to become more flexible, (so that I could actually stretch productively--not that I will ever enjoy doing that nor make it much of a priority in life). It also helped me get over some of my overuse injuries that plagued me for my first two years of school. I had other random issues, the most annoying being a twist in my abdomen which gave me the appearance of one side of obliques being REALLY strong (one side of my hip being closer to the opposite ribs than the other set) and was variable, i.e. some days it was worse than others (fascial pull, not structural at all. Had it checked by a physio.). I remember saying to a ballet teacher in frustration one day that it felt like I had a different body every day that I had to learn how to work with. Some days you could see it just to see me stand and some (most) days I'd have to be lying down for it to be obvious. It lead to a bad habit in first year of me forcing turnout on the left side in 5th when that foot was in front in an effort to force my hip backward, because I couldn't figure out how else to fix it--as it was I always felt like I was doing obliques only on the one side just to try to stand straight, and it still wasn't enough. It took about six months of adding the Fascial Movement work into what I was doing already, but the pull is gone. So certainly the fact that I saw results in my own self helped to direct my course of study. I would not be comfortable per se beginning a topic on this, as I am not an instructor trainer, and it is a trademarked brand, which I'm pretty sure violates both some of Merrithew's rules and also possibly some on this board. I would be happy to share some general information about how I use fascial work in general to help dancers, but that would be all I am comfortable doing. edit: sorry for the strange text sizing, I have no idea why it's doing that. I'm too old to be techy anymore, apparently!!!
  20. Also, I'm not trying to stir the pot! Admins, if this is too much, please remove.
  21. The narrator called it the "U Dome". It does look like a geodesic dome.
  22. It's a 3-D, full body scanner. I tried to understand/find the name of the machine, but no luck yet. The dancers are still, standing in the machine. The sides remain open. (It is not a PET-CT machine). For the express purpose, as stated by the director, to figure out where the dancers are not 100% symmetrical and aligned, and ostensibly to work on that. If they are checking for scoliosis, that was not made clear.
  23. Eligus

    A Reintroduction

    Welcome back... I am REALLY interested in this topic, is there anyway you can share/post/educate us about what you are discovering in the fascia aspect? Why did you pick this area to study? I just started researching some articles/you tube postings on fascia release as a way to address (possibly?) some issues my DD is working on with regard to her leg shape. There is what looks like a great deal of "marketing" out there, without a lot of scientific study, but it is my opinion that this topic area might be extremely helpful for tight hip flexors (?), tight Achilles (?), and possibly sculpting the long, lean muscles every ballet dancer craves. So in addition to the "marketing" stuff, I think there might be some really interesting facts out there that I'd love to discover. I'm not trying to blow up your welcome back post, so maybe a new post on this topic is called for.... but your comment caught my eye as something I'm really interested in and I think fascia is a really untapped area of study that may help a lot of dancers. If you can point me to a book or course you are studying, that would be extremely helpful.
  24. learningdance

    Princess Grace School, Monaco

    CVan. . Can you explain more please? They scan bodies in motion or still? And for what expressed purpose?
  25. I watched the documentary. Fonty is correct; it is mostly in French, but I speak it, so that was not a problem. One thing that really stood out to me was the 3-D scanner they use to check the symmetry of the dancers' bodies. That seems EXTREME. Are there other schools that use this technology? The director of the school even said that just watching students in class, they don't notice differences, but after going into the machine, they can pinpoint "problems". I get it if they use it to help, but the dancer they were discussing had a shoulder that was imperceptibly lower than the other one. This seems like it will feed into even more body dysmorphia for these kids. Not everyone is 100 % symmetrical. And, if you can't notice it with your eyes, and the dancer is talented and can really do the work, is this necessary?
  26. Victoria Leigh

    Frustrating Alignment Issues

    Do you have a problem with getting your knees totally straight?
  27. Smart girl! Enjoying her time there is the best for any dancer! I know at least a couple of us have kids in the program. If she needs/wants to meet kids in the program during Jazz Showcase, let us know.
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