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  2. Mina in seoul

    Ballet Schools in Korea

    Is my post too late? I just came upon this site. sgk1290, you probably already found where to get dance supplies by now but a lot of our hobby and pre-major students shop at eballetshop. One of their locations is across the street from the Seoul Arts Center. They have a lot of brands so you can find some decent priced items. Most other dance shops are in the Apgujeong area. A lot of dance pre-majors/majors get there pointe shoes at Top Toe near Apgujeong Rodeo Station. They're also the only store allowed to sell Gaynor Mindens in Korea, I think. They have sales, and deals but for the most part not cheap. As for Julia Ballet, I think it's best to physically visit them and get the information directly. I would think you'd fit into their Intensive Ballet 6 level. From what I recall the one in Seocho was formerly Universal Ballet Academy, which was also affiliated with Universal Ballet Company but they reorganized it and it became Julia Ballet Academy with 2 more locations.
  3. redvelvetcake

    Just suppose

    You could also try energetiks an Australian online dance supplier. They have a good range of ballet tights, leotards etc for boys. I get my son's ballet shoes from MDM another online supplier from Victoria in Australia. We also use boys dance too for the tights, and the wear moi brand leotards. I shop during the online sales and try to buy the things he needs at once because the postage can be expensive.
  4. Yesterday
  5. Barbara K

    Sweat stains on leotard

    “First comes the sweat, and then comes the beauty. If you are lucky and have said your prayers.” George Balanchine
  6. Kalashnikov

    Yoodelihihoo!

    It's never too late to start!
  7. abirgirl

    Miami City Ballet School

    Linrc1, yes, wonderful news! I'm also wondering about all of the amazing pre-pro graduates who do not join the company.
  8. Linrc1

    Miami City Ballet School

    MCB announced their new roster yesterday. At least two from the pre-pro program joined the company. They entered the pre-pro program after studying at BAE and attending the SI.
  9. abirgirl

    Miami City Ballet School

    Can LRivers or anyone comment on placement of pre-pro graduates from 2018? The info provided on the previous page is from 2017, which is great, but I’d love some additional placement info.
  10. Skyla, I think Munchkin is giving a great view point from her own experience, and pretty much what I would advise - as would the professional teachers on this messageboard. The syllabus and exams are not really relevant for what your life goals are - they are a means to an end. BUT ... there may be better means to the end you wish to achieve - learning the art and grace of ballet as well as the steps. You don't need a syllabus class, what you need is a class with a nurturing teacher who enjoys teaching adults and has the skills to teach adult beginners. There are a lot of such teachers around - and if you can supplement regular classes with master classes, one or two day ballet workshops for adults, or the excellent teaching available in the big London studios, you'll get there. Ballet syllabi (RAD, Cecchetti, BBO, ISTD etc) are designed to take children from the age of 18 to around 18 in either recreational or pre-professional vocational training. The lower grades - where you'd need to start - are not really designed for adult beginners. You need a class designed specifically for adult beginners. A course where you pay a termly fee - a regular enrolment class - would be ideal for you. Here's a starting point to see if any of these locations work for you: https://www6.surreycc.gov.uk/Coursefinder/(S(i5dchool333qep2n5qedjdv3))/SearchResults.aspx If you can get to south London, the RAD runs regular enrolment classes in the RAD syllabus. https://www.royalacademyofdance.org/learn-to-dance/adult-classes-at-the-rad However, these are for Intermediate Foundation and above which are too advanced for a beginner, even with your physical skills. Morley College runs dance classes: https://www.morleycollege.ac.uk/study-areas/dance The City Lit also runs termly beginners ballet courses: https://www.citylit.ac.uk/courses/performing-arts/dance Then here is a set of suggestions and recommendations for teachers in London who teach 'open' or drop in classes at professional studios, and whom I have observed, taken class from, and would recommend for adult beginners: Danceworks (very easily accessible London studio - Bond Street Tube, on the Jubilee line direct from Waterloo mainline station which serves Surrey). http://danceworks.net/beginner-classes/ Of the teachers there, I would recommend Hannah Frost. As a more advanced dancer, I still do her class whenever I'm in London (I live 3 hours away) and I see complete beginners join her class. She gives extra help, explains posture & stance, and we spend about the first 10-15 minutes of class going through these things, including a ballet warm up. It's a tough class, and she is demanding, but funny and really kind (underneath her tough exterior). She's very helpful to beginners, and tells them they need to do about 3 or 4 weeks of class before it stops feeling weird. If you could get to her class regularly, you'd learn the basics with excellent advice on alignment & technique. And she's brilliant at remembering people - I go about once every 6 weeks or 2 months, and she remembers my name every time. Central Nights at Central School of Ballet (5 min walk from Farringdon tube & mainline station, or bus to Waterloo): https://www.centralschoolofballet.co.uk/aectimetable.php Of the teachers there, again Hannah Frost, or David Kierce. I love Renato Paroni's teaching, and Nina Thilas-Mohs, but they are not beginner's classes in the way you need them. I just tried out David Kierce's Beginner Improver class earlier this week for the first time (at my age I'm "collecting" different teachers & teaching approaches). It's a good clear class, well-structured and his focus is on precision & clarity of technique. I found the precision a challenge because I get sloppy sometimes! I'd go again if I'm in London on a Monday night, but it was very crowded - far too crowded actually, to really dance out. So the centre exercises are rather static. However, Mr Kierce organises everyone extremely well, so beginners learn ballet etiquette about keeping in specified groups and lines. But I wanted to move a bit more - that's me though, as I enjoy a class with lots of travelling pirouette combinations and big jumps. Not for a beginner! You could go to his Beginner Intensive sessions, to get the basics into your body - I think you'd find them fun and challenging (Mr Kierce is very funny & charismatic - he has a huge fan base as a teacher of late adult starters!) and you'd get an excellent technical foundation. Details of his teaching schedule here: https://www.beginneradultballet.com/ Good luck in finding a good class - it's about finding the right kind of teacher who will help you start to find the technique in your body. Let us know how you get on, and maybe we can give you some more tips and advice.
  11. hersupport

    Colburn Dance Institute

    I am sorry you have not heard back. I only have great things to say about the program. Although there were a few times I did not hear back right away. Hopefully you hear soon.
  12. Ecourtney

    Colburn Dance Institute

    We did not receive any results or any acknowledgement that her video submission was received despite 3 phone messages and 4 unanswered email inquiries. Hersupport, your DD attended Colburn so can you shed some light on how well administered this school is? I know the instruction is very good and the dancers are being placed well but the fact that you cannot get a return phone call or email reply from the Admissions office is a major red flag. If we were local it may not be as big of a deal but the idea of sending by DD across the country to be a part of a program that you can't reliably communicate with is concerning.
  13. hersupport

    Colburn Dance Institute

    The results were e-mailed this evening.
  14. Last week
  15. I completely relate to a lot of how you said you feel in class. I also feel lost in a new studio environment and take a little longer to pick up combinations. However, after moving to a more open format of class, I’ve become more confident because I’ve had some very supportive teachers. Some classes they will keep combinations similar or the same for a few weeks so you have time to pick the steps up, whilst still teaching you the important skill of using your brain and not becoming a zombie! It’s difficult but I do believe with the right teacher and a little patience you should be able to find everything you are looking for in a normal class. Syllabus is great for learning the basics but I’m not sure dancing with younger children (unless you do find an adult syllabus class) will help you find that confidence and fluidity you are looking for. I would maybe start with finding a school with the right ethos and go from there? Explain your goals, where you are now, where you’d like to go. Tell them how you learn best and that you’d like to be pushed to improve. Some adult classes they assume you are just there to dance but not learn, most good teachers will work with you in more detail once they know you take a correction as a compliment not an insult... find a well trained teacher who enjoys working with adults and will be able to give you the tools and techniques to master the simple moves (if we can ever say we have mastered anything in ballet ever!) whilst still keeping the freedom of a non-syllabus class. I’ve been very lucky to have some truly wonderful teachers, each have taught me something slightly different. I started off in syllabus class when I first started ballet at 16. I was so focused on learning everything and improving my technique, which my first few teachers gave me a wonderful grounding in but I became very stiff and tense. I also never learnt to adapt to different surroundings or pick up combinations quickly. I still struggle with this and linking steps together. When I joined my first adult ballet class I finally realised what it was like to feel free at the barre. This teacher taught me to let go and that everything can’t always be perfect! I gained a lot of confidence, my technique actually improved because I wasn’t tense all the time and her musical combinations taught me a lot more about feeling the music and enjoying myself. I joined another adult class with another teacher who also pushed me to learn steps I didn’t think I could do. I pick things up much faster now, she’s challenged me to link combinations more smoothly and overall just not to overthink everything... I’ve also been lucky enough to take class for various master classes and drop ins in London, syllabus class never prepared me for these and I would have missed out on so much if I hadn’t pushed myself to go. Every teacher gives a different class and makes you focus on something new which is amazing. Sorry for the very long post, basically in summary you aren’t alone, I think everyone feels a little lost in class at first. Take a bit of a risk and try a few different classes until you find the right one for you. Ballet is amazing, excellent teachers make it even better.
  16. Redbookish, Doubleturn, munchkin16, thank you for the feedback and support. Maybe I should start with how I ended up here in the first place. My ballet incident at the age of five can be owed due to my poor sense of direction and orientation. When my exam started I was facing a different direction than I normally did in class. I forgot my whole routine. I still struggle to follow and remember sequences others pick up quickly to this day. I cannot drive without a GPS unless I am driving on a familiar road I have taken many times, I have no sense of direction. I despise taking fast-paced gym classes such as aerobics and kickboxing and zumba because I do not catch on to the routine as quick as the other people, and I often use the wrong foot or leg when the instructor is facing the class. Needless to say, my mother had me taking horse riding lessons soon after my short-lived ballet career ended and I went on to do competitive show jumping for the following 14 years. I stopped riding when I went to Uni and took up fencing which I absolute adore to this day. I moved to the UK and even though I would very much like to return to fencing, clubs are few and far apart and it's a very expensive sport not currently within my reach. In search of a more affordable activity in my area I discovered Les Mills Body Balance classes at a local sport centre, which is a combination of yoga, pilates and tai chi sequences. I soon discovered I have very good balance, I can perform slow movements with calculated precision and my muscles have a great deal of endurance. This escalated to joining the Les Mills On Demand programme online, where I discovered Barre. I became obsessed with turning the excruciating muscle burn into grace. In the midst of my temporary ballet inspired insanity I jumped down the rabbit hole three months ago and *BAM* here I am, looking for adult ballet programmes. Why I want to follow a syllabus: I do better in a structured learning environment. Mastering predetermined short term goals provides me with more control as opposed to learning something at my own pace which leaves me feeling lost. I understand that in the instance of ballet that might not be suitable for me, but trust that your guidance and some homework on the topic will lead me down the most feasible route. What I want to achieve short-term: The fulfilment of mastering single components with calculated precision and turning it into one graceful, expressive and fluid movement. What I want to achieve long-term: self confidence, self acceptance, empowerment, fulfilment and freedom. I experienced some harsh knocks over the past few years. Inspired by rejection, I lost . . . lbs in body weight over the past year. I also suffer from severe depression. Mastering a ''ballet-inspired'' (aka fake ballet) movement in a fitness class does not make a dancer. What remains important is the fact that that one movement served to awaken my soul and brought back a sense of control to an otherwise disorderly life. It made something beautiful from the chaos I so often feel.
  17. Excellent advice, Munchkin! Especially finding a good teacher & dancing with like-minded adults.
  18. I live in Surrey area, happy to try and give some recommendations but what towns/cities that are nearby to you as a start? What are your goals for the classes? Most studios run syllabus classes only for children, however I know of some that do allow adults to join these. A good studio with a good adult ballet class might be more enjoyable though, as you would be with like minded adults. At the end of the day, the most important thing is finding a good teacher, that will make all the difference whether you end up in a syllabus class or more open adult class.
  19. Skyla

    Yoodelihihoo!

    Redbookish, Thank you for the warm welcome and kind words! I look forward to learning from everyone here!
  20. Hi Water, You can give them a call and discuss your daughter’s training history. The recommended age for adult classes at schools like Steps (and BDC, Peridance etc.) in NYC is usually 12-13, but many 10-11 year olds with a solid foundation are allowed into the beginner or advanced beginner courses. Their own pre-teen & teen students sometimes drop into these classes during school breaks. My daughter was allowed in at that age & it wasn’t a problem. Although she was the youngest (& only child) in the beginner class, there were enough adults with zero experience, so she wasn’t the “weak link” or anything. In fact, she was even asked to demonstrate at times. In our experience, they just needed her dance background information to see which class would be a good fit & then double checked with the staff to see which teachers were okay with it. They placed her into the advanced beginner class, but it didn’t fit into our schedule so we went with beginner. As redbookish mentioned, attending one of their children’s classes might be another option. They have a pre-prof ballet division, so perhaps your daughter can take one of those classes. However, I do know that they will be having their pre-prof placement classes for the fall next week, so I’m not sure how easily you’ll be accommodated in the children’s division in the midst of that. Please let us know what you decide!
  21. Redbookish

    Yoodelihihoo!

    Welcome to Ballet Talk for Dancers, Skyla. Glad you found us! And I'm sorry to hear about your sense of failure at the age of 5. The JOY of being an adult ballet student is that you have a lot more freedom and choice. No need to pin your self-esteem on a ribbon or prize - you can work consistently with a group of good teachers and learn to achieve goals you set for yourself. I've answered your other query, so perhaps on your other thread you can tell us a bit more about what your goals & aims are.
  22. I've never lived in Surrey, but it's a crowded county - you might start to look at the main cities in Surrey. If Brighton's not accessible, then maybe there are schools in and around Guildford? (not trying to get you to say where you live on this forum, though!) Is London at all accessible? The RAD at Battersea does adult syllabus classes (in RAD, of course). You could also contact them to ask if they know of ay schools in your area. It's also worth contacting the Cecchetti organisation via the ISTD - again, headquarters in London, but they may know of associate schools. The other thing to think about is why the exams & the syllabus are important? If syllabus & exams are all you've experienced before as a child, it may be that you might appreciate the freedom of the adult ballet student, and what can be gained from experiencing different teachers & techniques. Most adults don't bother too much about doing exams, but develop & progress via consistent attendance working with one or two teachers. This is how it works in my home studio, and I see this in the drop in open adult ballet classes I attend semi-regularly in London - regular participants develop good teaching & development relationships with their teachers - it's clear from comments in class that good teachers of drop-in/open classes are attentive to the progress of people who attend regularly at the London studios I go to (Danceworks and Central Nights at Central School of Ballet). You could contact your local dance agency (not an agent who gets work for dancers!): these are partially state funded, and exist to promote dance across their communities: https://southeastdance.org.uk/ https://www.communitydance.org.uk/useful-contacts-and-links/dance-agencies If you can say more about what it is you;'re seeking in terms of a learning experience, we might be able to help a bit more. And the UK site Doubleturn suggests is also very useful.
  23. Does attendance in HS guarantee acceptance into the college program?
  24. Hi, dhddandme! Congratulations! I was also accepted to the UNCSA dance program for my senior year in high school. I am not yet sure if I want to attend, but I did visit their campus for two days earlier this month. I shadowed a student and was able to take ballet classes! Each room is for 2 students with stackable or un-stackable bunkbeds. Roommates are automatically randomly assigned unless both students request to be roomed with each other. I was also able to shadow academic classes and meet the academic director, Brock Snyder. I would definitely suggest trying to set up a campus visit. You can shadow a current student and really get a true feel for what it would be like to attend.
  25. learningdance

    YAGP Finals - a few questions

    Cool NYT article: https://www.nytimes.com/2019/04/16/arts/dance/youth-america-grand-prix-ballet-competition.html Shows Larissa's commitment to talent development and training.
  26. meatball77

    YAGP Finals - a few questions

    They don't live stream the final round because Lincoln Center rules don't allow it.
  27. Desiderata

    YAGP Finals - a few questions

    Thank you for responding Fraildove. I wish a program was available, or that they would add dancer names to the numbers that have passed. Would make it much easier for those of us following along from home and trying to catch certain dancers/pieces! 🙂 I hope they livestream tonight, but now that you mention it I seem to recall that Lincoln Center policies may not allow them to do so, darn it.
  28. Try asking on the UK discussion board Balletcoforum.
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