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Ballet Talk for Dancers

2 Summer Intensive Audition Questions


Guest ScottieGDE13

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Guest ScottieGDE13

Sorry if these have been asked.

 

Several audition requirements include a head shot. I know a copy of a picture (as opposed to the original) is acceptable but my head shot was done by a professional dance photographer in the area, would it be illegal to copy one of her pictures or would I just need to put a photo credit or ask for her permission? Or would it be acceptable to give them the original photo in a wallet size (we have tons left over!). Another option is to have my mom do a new one with our camera and avoid the situation altogether but I don't know what the programs are expecting. Any advice?

 

Also, (this sounds like a dumb question, I apologize) if they ask for a photo in arabesque at the barre, do they want one with one hand on the barre or is it better to give one that is in first arabesque with both hands free (assuming the picture shows equally good technique as the one with one hand on the barre.) I just don't want to do something wrong...

Sorry for all the questions.

Scottie

 

[ January 16, 2002: Message edited by: ScottieGDE13 ]

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Scottie, I'm not really sure about the use of photos which were professionally taken, but I think, since you purchased the photos, you should be able to use them. I could be wrong here. I will try to find out. I do know that dancers have professional photos taken for their resume portfolios, and they must make copies if they are sending out a large number of these.

 

As to the arabesque, if the information specifically says "at the barre", then I guess it would be fine to take the picture holding the barre. Most of the schools which list arabesque state "first arabesque", which would indicate that they want it without the barre, since one really cannot make a first arabesque holding the barre!

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You'll have to check the bill of sale from the photographer you used. If it says on there, somehow, something like "purchases, together with all title, right, claim and interest", then you're in the clear to use them for whatever you want. If that's not there, call the photog and find out.

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As a Photographer for a National studio chain, I can tell you that ANY photos taken by a Professional Photographer, whether it be Sears, Olin Mills, JC Penney, your school photographer or a local studio are Copyrighted.

Buying you pictures, does not mean that you own them. Most Photographers/Companies will give you a Copyright release after a grace period, usually after 3-6 months in time. Some exceptions for early realease of the Copyright might be in the event of a death of the photographed person, or wanting a product printed not offered by the original photography company.You can not go into Kmart/Walgreens, for example, and scan it for any purpose without a release, it's illegal and these companies strictly enforce the Copyright laws.

My advice to you is to:

If the photo is recent, ask for a reprint from the original Photographer/Company.

If they are unable to reprint it, ask for a copyright release, specific to what you are wanting printed and why. Any reputable business, should honor one of these requests for you.

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Before anyone gets concerned about a Mom posting on YD, she was invited by the moderators because she had professional information most pertinent to the question which was asked, and knowledge that neither of us were sure about. smile.gif

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One more thing on the photographs. I have it from an authority in NY that if a photographer takes photos that are known to be for auditions or portfolios then they are theirs to use and to copy. However, if photos were shot during performances, and the photographer was not paid in advance, they are considered to be the "art" of the photographer and the photographer holds all the rights. So, again, the answer is to check with the photographer!

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Scottie,

This year was the first time i have started to audition for summer intensive programs, so obviously i'm not an expert, however i did get my pictures for auditions taken by a professional, and it wasn't a problem. wink.gif

About the 1st Arabesque photo... I think it would be better to have it taken with both hands free. This way it will look more professional.

By the way, don't worry about doing something wrong because i'm sure everything will go just fine rolleyes.gif JUST HAVE CONFIDENCE IN YOURSELF!!! (That's what my dance teacher told me!) smile.gif

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Yes, Carmen, that is what most people seem to use. Although I will say this about that, because I have stopped asking for head shots and the reason is that most of them were "glamour" shots, and just looked so different from the way the student looks at the audition that they did not help me in terms of recollection when going through the forms after the auditions. It's amazing how much different one can look with hair down vs. ballet bun! smile.gif Anyway, I found that I could identify them better from the full body dance pose than from the head shot, and that makes one less thing to ask for and one less thing for me to deal with and attach to the registration form.

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Thanks!! It's a good thing too, because I have an audition tomorrow that requires a head shot!! I know what you mean about people looking different with their hair down vs. in a bun...it always catches me off guard when I see one of my dance friends with their hair down!! It's amazing how a bun makes such a diference...

 

~Carmen

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Guest hesterlover1

I don't know if this belongs on this thread, but some advice about audition pictures--if you are trying to get photos without a professional photographer, if possible use a digital camera! (A good one, that is.) That way, you know once you've gotten a good shot, and you can correct mistakes on the spot. You won't use a whole roll of film only to find that none of the pictures turned out okay--or that the lighting was all wrong!! I did this and it worked really well--SOOOO much easier than last year!!

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Ah, yes, you can do it. But the moral and ethical question then remains, "how much correction of the photograph constitutes the truth of the image?" In other words, it may be quite all right to correct for lighting, but to do digitally what Pavlova used to do with black paint on a negative, making her pointes look needle-sharp, may not be! And taking off twenty-five pounds won't work. Auditioners notice that sort of thing. wink.gif

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Actually, by "correcting mistakes on the spot" I think Katie was referring to retaking the photo and just deleting the bad one, which can be done with a digital camera! You take a photo, and, you see it right there on the little screen on the camera, and if you don't like it, you delete it and do another one.

 

However, Major Johnson is totally right about not trying to correct things on the photo itself, once it is in the computer. That would be a major No-No! eek.gif

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Guest hesterlover1

Yes, Miss Leigh, that's what I meant!! It didn't even occur to me that people might think I meant to mess around on the computer and edit your image! eek.gif Sorry if that came across wrong... What I liked about using the digital was that I could look at the picture and say, 'I don't like the way my back hand is drooping so much', and I could immediately fix my line, etc.. Sorry for the confusion!!

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