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Ballet Talk for Dancers

UGHHHH...Pirouettes!!!


Guest aeangel008

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Guest aeangel008

hey everyone, I just started ballet and everyone says i am doing really well, but i just can't get pirouettes!!!!! I practice them at home, in school, in gym class, and any where I can and i still cant seem to do them ! They are very, very frustrating! and i was wondering if anyone else had this problem, and could give me some advice!?! thanks....Joelle mad.gif

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Pirouettes are not for those who REQUIRE instant gratification; you have to work at them. Try starting with a normal preparation, but just do ¼ turn, all the way around the circle. That's four times. Now, do it to the other side. Then to ½ turns, and then three-quarters, then a full single. And after that, just keep adding quarter-turns or half-turns until you've got them. It takes a lot of work, and a lot of feeling the "press down" into the floor, so you know you have a solid base to turn on. Of course, for ever action, there is an equal and opposite reaction, so the "press down" is accompanied by a simultaneous "rise up". After all, the pirouette is only a balance that turns! smile.gif

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Joelle, it is highly likely that since you just started ballet you do not yet have the technical knowledge and ability to do pirouettes. Pirouettes are generally not taught in the beginning stages of ballet. Before one can do pirouettes, even with the excellent information given above by Major Johnson, smile.gif , one needs to have enough training to be able to execute a strong relevé passé, centered and balanced, and of course rotated and with the working foot properly placed. You also need to know how to spot, and all the mechanics and motivating factors of turning. Have you accomplished these things yet? eek.gif

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I do agree with Ms.Leigh about needing to have experience and knowledge with turns to do them. But you still can try! A good excercise to find your center during pirouettes is: prepare for the pirouette, go up and hold it. Do not turn just hold yourself there. Make sure your foot and arms are in the correct positions. If your arms and hands are not in the correct position they will slow you down. Also, let your arms lead you, that will help you get around. And spot, spot, spot!

-Good luck

~Meghan wink.gif

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I also have a problem with pirouettes. I can do singles and doubles, but when it comes to triples I always hop on my supporting leg or slow down. Is this because I am not taking a deep enough plie or spotting? I will ask my teacher but I don't have class until Tuesday. Any advice? confused.gif

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Meghan, the problem with your advice, aside from the fact that we do not like for students to give advice on technique here, is that if she practices it without having the technique to do it, she will build in bad habits that could make them that much more difficult later. She clearly stated that she just started ballet. And I clearly stated that beginning students do not do pirouettes. Sorry to be hard on you here, but telling her it's okay to practice them anyway is not good advice. Also, the arms don't create the turn, or "lead you", they are helpful in terms of support, but are a reaction to the correct use of the back muscles.

 

As to your not being able to do a triple, when your doubles are solid, only someone watching you could see the reasons for that. It could be that you are letting go of the spot too soon, or letting go of the back muscles or the quads, or just not enough force. No way to know without seeing it.

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Guest Ballet_babe_123

She said (and forgive me Ms. Leigh, if I am speaking the wrong advice, as I know that the moderators should answer the questions) that she's 'hopping' on her supporting leg, could this be corrected by pulling up further on the supporting leg?

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Would be nice if it were that simple, Jenn smile.gif However, there is usually another cause for the supporting leg relaxing before the intended number of turns are completed.

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