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Ballet Talk for Dancers

my legs really hurt!


Guest dinky

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Dinkydancer, I'm sorry but I have no clue what you mean by "doing turnouts"! Turning the legs out, which happens from the hips, does not cause pain in the calf muscles. A lot of jumping or relevés on demi pointe, especially if this was a first class after a long break, could do that. But not turning out the legs. Please explain what you are talking about! :)

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Do you mean "After tryouts"? I was just thinking that was what you may have meant to say.

 

I think you probably just overworked your calf muscles but if you mean while working on your ballet turnout, then you need to see your instructor about your technique. Anyway, I usually get that a few days after a really strenuous workout, something I'm not used to doing all the time (like tap) that works different muscles. Ice helps a lot, after a few days try stretching gently and ease back into working out slowly. In the future, make sure you stretch after working out, it helps prevent all that pain.

 

[ 09-16-2001: Message edited by: Andrew ]

 

[ 09-16-2001: Message edited by: Andrew ]

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Guest Azza_4eva

I think you'll find that you're sore not solely because of turnout but that because you were working on turnout you probably put more effort into other aspects of your dancing. I suggest a long warm bath and tiger balm - I don't know how medically proven this is, but it works for me.

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Azza, that's a good old palliative (something to make it hurt less) - heat. Initial applications of cold minimize damage from an injury you know you've sustained, but if you have a "sneaky Pete" that doesn't show itself until the next day, then heat is a fine way to make it feel better. And it's a good excuse to add some bath salts and pamper yourself a little! ;) With or without the contrast application of a cold pack immediately after, it does take away some of the pain. And Tiger Balm is also great stuff! Burns so much on the outside, you don't feel the inside anymore! Actually, besides being a counterirritant, TB is a rubrefacient, which causes more blood to flow toward an injured area.

 

[ 09-19-2001: Message edited by: Mel Johnson ]

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