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Ballet Talk for Dancers

grand battement en cloche


Guest dancin'g'al

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Actually, dancin'g'al, I believe that was meant as a yes smile.gif They are supposed to be like a "bell", and that would mean that the leg moves equally in both directions. It doesn't always happen that way in grand battement en cloche, as a lot of people have more front extension than back, but I believe it is supposed to be equal.

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Guest dancin'g'al

Thanks, Ms Leigh,that cleared things up a little...But just for arguement's sake... In the ABT's ballet dictionary, they have vidoes of people demonstrating.And the girl doing the grand battement en cloche did the front WAY higher then the back!!!

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Not too surprising, as things are not always done in "textbook" fashion. smile.gif Battement en cloche is done keeping the body straight, so most people are able to do higher front battements. With battement balancoire the upper body moves ("tilts" slightly), allowing more swing in the leg, which generally would allow the leg to go higher in the back. The same can be achieved in battement en cloche if one allows a small forward movement of the body, not a tilt, just a forward and upward movment like for an arabesque.

 

[ December 29, 2001: Message edited by: Victoria Leigh ]

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sorry to post here, but miss Leigh, i don't really understand what you mean by your explanation.

Could you please help me out? Thank you in advance,

 

~SKIP~

 

[ December 29, 2001: Message edited by: Skip ]

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What part of it is not clear, Skip? I'll be happy to try again if you tell me what exactly you don't understand!

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"Battement en cloche is done keeping the body straight, so most people are able to do higher front battements. With battement balancoire the upper body moves ("tilts" slightly), allowing more swing in the leg, which generally would allow the leg to go higher in the back. The same can be achieved in battement en cloche if one allows a small forward movement of the body, not a tilt, just a forward and upward movment like for an arabesque."

 

so, you're not supposed to tilt your upperbody with battements en cloche confused.gif

the battement balancoire tilts confused.gif

and then the last sentence that you can do the same in the battement en cloche if you move your body forward, but don't tilt it confused.gif

 

i'm sorry, but i really don't get it and i hope that you can help

 

~SKIP~

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I had assumed that battement en cloche and battement balancoire were the same thing. I hadn't heard of balancoire before I watched a class at Royal Ballet, Mikhail Messerer called it balancoire so I thought it must be the term used in Russian technique schools. In RAD we do en cloche but i'm only in grade 6, maybe balancoire comes later! smile.gif

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Okay, Skip, let me try again smile.gif

 

Balançoire is the same as cloche with the working leg, however the body leans back on the front battement and forward on the back battement. Sometimes called Battement Jeté Balancé.

 

In Battement en cloche the body is supposed to remain upright. What I meant by moving forward to get the leg higher is simply the same kind of slightly forward movement one does in grand battement or developpé back all the time. It's not a tilt or lean at all, it's a very slight forward and upward movement of the body weight. If you stay absolutely straight upright when you do an arabesque, your leg will not get very high nor will it have much rotation. (Your gluteus maximus is in the way! wink.gif )

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so, in the battement en balancoire, you also have a 'swinging' movement in the upperbody...right?

i think i get it now, thank you very much for explaining

 

~SKIP~

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That is correct, Skip smile.gif

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Hello,

Unusually, when I first started to do grand battement en cloche, my leg went higher at the back! But that is me, my extension at the back is high, partly to do with my back.

So I brought it down slightly at the back so it was more even, for the purposes of RAD grade 6 exam.

What helped me to get my front extension higher in this was really applying pressure on the floor as the foot goes through first position, and then the leg flies up more easily, for me. It makes more of the step overall anyway. Of course without compromising turnout, the stabilty in the supporting leg or appearing to use the upper body in an attempt to throw the leg up!

In free classes I find a little epaulement in this exercise, looking out above the arm in second and appearing to use the upper back slightly( ie in opposition to your working leg ) is quite pretty, if your teacher permits it. I perhaps would play safe if in an exam. I don't know the accepted way - Miss Leigh, do you know if this is permitted?

Becky

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Sorry, Becky, I am not an RAD teacher, so I don't know what is accepted in the exams. Major Mel will know. But when the body moves it is technically not battement en cloche, it's balançoire. (Read the descriptions in my posts above.) smile.gif

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