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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Heavy Legs


Guest ForeverRed06

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That probably is a factor, but the big reason is the loss of agility after four years out of class.

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Guest BlossomingBallerina

Try not to think about the weight of your legs. its not your outer image that makes you beautiful, it is your inner image, and how you feel inside! Also I have pretty big legs to,not HUGE or GIGANTIC though! A saying that always helped me was "Uplift with lightness!' ;) ~*~ Alix ~*~

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Guest Zoe Watson

;) Heya,

What really helped me with my turns etc. was that my teacher told me to breath in. Obviously not lifting your shoulders up, but breathing in, chin up and have relaxed shoulders. This helps bring your body up and really does make a difference!

Keep going you'll be fine!!

LOL

Zoe

XXXXX

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Zoe, you can make additions and corrections to your own posts by using the "edit" function from the icons at the top of the post.

 

It's the pencil and paper icon next to the quotation marks. (See how it works?)

 

[ 06-27-2001: Message edited by: Mel Johnson ]

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Sorry, Zoe, but I disagree with the breathing in part. The pirouette is a reaction to the motivating movement (the preparation and the downward and circular thrust of energy) and should work better and also be MUCH easier to keep the tension out with an exhale on the turn itself. Inhale on the preparation, exhale into the pirouette. Tension stops movement, and inhaling causes excess tension, especially in the shoulders and arms.

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I always found that breathing OUT during the pirouette kept me more relaxed and less likely to freak out. I always hated pirouettes and would psyche myself into doing them poorly. When I didn't think about them and exhaled I did much better.

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Guest ForeverRed06

Thanks everyone for their input, I found that breathing out and staying high on my toes, helped a lot. Now I can do much better, though I have trouble with keeping my toe pointed on my knee. Usually, my feet ends up going of in different directions or laying flat on the side of my knee. I found out that if you, when about to start the pirouette (sorry if I spelled that wrong, mr. mel), curl one hand in front of you and the other but to the side, then pull the curled hand to its side and close your arms (not all the way, leave about 3 or 4 inches) you can get good momentum and even pull of a double or triple! :) Also, stand on the top of the toes and lead with the head. I know I'm giving advice for my own question, but I found out more about it after my post. Here's a question, what stretches or excersizes can I do to be able to make my leg go higher in preparing for a pirouette. Thanks and sorry for the LONG post! ;)

 

[ 07-03-2001: Message edited by: Mel Johnson ]

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I'm afraid I don't understand your question about "making your leg go higher in preparing for your pirouette". Are you talking about getting to a higher relevé, or getting your retiré position higher? Either way, the exercises to do it are to take the preparation, being sure to be all the way up out of your standing leg in the tendu, place your 4th position with the weight primarily in the front leg, demi plié and relevé to the pirouette position and hold it as long as you can. Another good exercise is to do promenade in the pirouette position, both en dehors and en dedans. This way you can work on the position of the working leg, the back muscles, the arms, everything!

 

By the way, I really don't like the idea of "curling hands" at all! That description creates an image that could be very wrong and not at all what you want to do! :) Also, pulling off doubles and triples is totally useless if you don't have a REALLY GOOD POSITION to turn in! That means placement, rotation, full stretch of the supporting leg, and beautiful working leg and foot. Without this I don't care if someone can do 10 pirouettes, because they will not be anything we want to look at!

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Guest Zoe Watson

:D:D:D:D:D:D:D SORRY!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

I actually meant Victoria, to inhale when preparing and then breathe out once doing it. I got a bit muddled Balletdanzer!!!!!

Sorry for the confusion

 

:D

LOL

Zoe

XXXXXXXXXXX

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Guest Ileene

Puzzled?

If you are using all you muscles correctly can you get fat legs? If so why have I never seen a prof. dancer with fat legs? and how do they keep them skinny? :confused: :eek:

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Ileene, overly muscled legs and fat legs are two different things. Using your muscles correctly should keep them from becoming overdeveloped. However, one could still have heavy legs if one is overweight or has the tendency to carry the majority of their weight below the waist. People carry their weight differently, and some, particulary females, tend to carry more below the waist than above the waist. Professional dancers vary a great deal in structure and muscle development, but most tend to have a long muscle structure as opposed to a bulky structure.

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