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BalletNutter

BA in dance versus BFA

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Dance_Scholar_London

What is the ratio male:female students in these programmes?

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Victoria Leigh

I would not have the first clue, DSL, nor any idea how to find out. I do know that, as with most ballet schools except possibly ABT, SAB, Houston, and maybe a couple of others, the ratio of male to female is very low. There are always less male dancers, by far. Some schools don't have any, others have a handful, and only the ones above seem to have a better ratio, although there are still always more females. Some of the other schools with better ratios might include SFB, PNB, and NBofC, but I really don't know. Just a bit of somewhat educated guessing here. :shrug: As for college dance departments, I don't even have a guess!

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Guest ScottieGDE13

I have no actual figure for the male to female ratio in college dance programs, but at TCU we began the school year in 2004 with 60-70 dance majors (freshmen to senior) and 10 of those were men. If I remember right, we ended the year with 9 men. I was led to believe that, in comparison to other programs, this was good.

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ConstanzaElisabeth

after finishing my first year in Utah's program, the four men in the freshman class are all leaving, and there is only one other male in the college program, two in the high school concurrent(twins, but there mostly for character and partnering) and i have heard that we have about five coming in next semester.

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balletbooster

At NCSA, a great many of the students do not finish their degrees, as they get contracts and leave after a year or two. But, when their careers are over, they will already have a year or two of college under their belts and then if they do want/need to get that degree, they are almost half way there! :)

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Guest wolfeh

How many and how often do college students at NSCA get offered contracts and to what kinds of companies? I know that I could just as easily look the numbers up online, etc., but what are the real life possibilities?

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balletbooster

My information is really anecdotal, as I can only speak to the current year. This year, I know of a college freshman who got a contract from Houston (female) and a male (not sure his grade level, but not a freshman) who got a contract to Richmond Ballet and another male who got a contract to Ballet Nevada. There may be others in the college program with contracts that I am not aware of too.

 

The college ballet program is small. They take their classes with the upper division of the high school and can be in any of the 4 levels there. They are part of the Dance Dept. performances, that include the high school students. Some students in college are grads of the high school program and others are not. I believe that there are 4-5 HS grads this year that plan to continue next year in the program. The college students are not always in the highest level of the school, nor are they always the leads in productions. For dance purposes, they are considered just as any member of the upper division and are placed and cast based upon their abilities.

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e'smom

Just a correction, the Indiana Univ. ballet degree is a Bachelor of Science in Music, not a BFA. This is offered as a full concentration in ballet (more like a BFA) or as ballet and an "outside field" which is what we were told 94% of the majors choose.

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dancemaven

The difference between a B.A. and a B.F.A. might also come into play when entering a graduate program other than in dance. For instance, a non-dance related graduate program my (current BFA-seeking) dd may be interested in requires a BA. It doesn't specific what discipline the B.A. must be in, so I don't know whether it matters. But, the question then arises whether a BFA will fill the bill. :nixweiss: It may be that she just needs to cover some specific classes during undergrad or at some point before she is able to enter that particular graduate program. I've suggested to her that she just call the program's admissions department and find out.

 

So, just one more question to throw into the mix. (As if we don't have enough confusing questions as it is.)

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dreamofdancing

Sorry if this thread is a bit old to bring back.

 

If a college or university offering a B.A. in ballet has its own Dance Department (from which the B.A. comes), would that be the same as or similar to what Ms. Leigh mentioned before in this thread, about making sure a dance degree comes from a College of Fine Arts? One of the colleges I am interested in offers a B.A. only in ballet, but offers the same classes as the B.F.As of other colleges on my list. Almost all of the faculty members of this college were former professional dancers. I want to join a professional ballet company after college, and am trying to gain as much knowledge as possible. Thanks :grinning:

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Mel Johnson

Again, each institution must be considered twice. Once by itself, and what the typical courseload for the degree would be, and next, by how it compares with other places who offer both the BA and the BFA, and what their courseloads are like, and what subjects covered. If you see a lot of courses which involve a lot of "sitting classes" as opposed to studio work, you're tracking as an academic. If there's lots of studio and workshop time, you have a degree aimed for performance. Things will vary from place to place, as the institutions are governed by not only their own educational philosophy, but also state education law and regional accreditation standards.

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dreamofdancing

Thank you, Mr. Johnson! :grinning:

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MJ

To add to Mr J, Some colleges are restricted from offering certain degress, accreditation boards, and state board of Regents may influence what degrees a college can offer. A large state university system may want to restrict the number of institutions issuing a certain degree. Business schools are money makers, fines arts lose money for universities (all those studios and facilities cost money).

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