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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Ballets: Don Quixote????


ABTBluebird

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Hi. I am very confused about something. This may be a stupid question, but here goes:

 

What is the difference between let's say ABT's Don Q, and NYCB's Don Q?? I am more familiar with the classical version, and own the Nureyev's Don Quixote video, but on my video about Suzanne Farrell, it shows a clip of nycb's Don Q, and it is entirely different. She is playing Dulcenea or something, and the music is different, and so is the style and costume. Is this because Balanchine created his own version or something???Are there two different versions??? I have heard about NYCB's more "neo classical" ballets, but what does neo classical mean??

Please explain!!

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You've pretty much got it. Balanchine did a completely new version of Don Q-- and it was neoclassical, rather than classical. (Most, if not all of his works are considered neoclassical). Neoclassical ballet, or contemporary ballet is sort of a catch all term for works that use ballet vocabulary, ballet dancers, and pointe shoes, but with a contemporary twist that either relates to costuming, the way steps are put together or the way the dancers do the steps. Balanchine, Robbins, some Macmillan fall into this category. HTH!

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She is playing Dulcenea or something, and the music is different, and so is the style and costume.

"Dulcinea or something," is a good way to describe Suzanne Farrell's role in Balanchine's "Don Quixote. She appears to the Don as herself, as well as Mary Magdalen, the Virgin Mary, a Shepardess, and the Lady of the Silver Moon. The music is by Nicholas Nabokov, with whom Balanchine worked closely on the scenario. It has nothing in common with the Minkus score for the traditional Petipa ballet. Mr. B's Don Q is no longer in the repertory of NYCB, and hasn't been in years. I was hoping it might be revived for the Balanchine Centennial season, but it wasn't. However, there's been talk of a revival by the Suzanne Farrell Ballet.

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If you want a definition of Neoclassical, you might want to try searching on the other board for "classicism" "neoclassical" &c. We've discussed that issue a great deal and there are a lot of ideas, if not a set-in-stone definition, as well as a lot of historical background.

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Thanks so much, guys!!! I actually get it now!! I'm so glad that's all cleared up, because it was bugging me for months!!! lol thanks again! :shhh:

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  • 1 month later...

Hi

 

I would like to try the variation which is danced by the soloist in the Kirov tape of Don Q (version danced by Terekhova - Ruzimatov), in the Grand Pas, immediately after the pas de deux (the one that begins with the diagonal of jete entrelaces followed by a fouette to attitude).

 

I wonder if someone knows of acceptable alternatives to the central combination, as it is quite difficult for a no-so-good at turns dancer (in the tape I mentioned above, the dancer does pas de bourree en tournant - then renverse - then preparation and a pirouette a la seconde). Just wonder if normal en dedans pirouettes (working leg on passe) are acceptable instead of the a la seconde pirouettes, or if there is another alternative, with altogether different steps.

 

Thanks so much

 

Silvy

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I imagine the normal pirouettes en dedans would work well. I've never come across that variation anywhere but on that tape, so I don't have any alternative combinations to suggest, although you could probably insert part of another variation if you wanted to without anyone noticing :D

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Thanks for the authorization, Hans!!! :D

 

Silvy

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silvy, if you are discussing to practice a variation in class, I have one answer and if you are discussing perfroming, another and if you are discussing going to competition yet another! :wink:

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vrs.

 

I am discussing performing it on stage - dont think that for a competition (though a lot of people round here still insist that I should, I dont like to compete anymore), but maybe for a competition, who knows :wink: !!!

 

Silvy

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silvy to perform this variation I would suggest working at first on a single in a la seconde en dedans with the idea that it is not a big deal if the single turn does not seem secure enough for stage work. You have the option to change it to a double en dedans in retire (passe). How long do you have to work on it? Try the turn in a la seconde with various arms...two in third or leaving the arms in second position. Whichever works best for you. Also remember not to sit in your prepartion. After renverse pas de bouree use the finish of the pas de bouree as the preparation for the turn. This should give you more momentum! :D

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Thanks, vrs for your advice, which I shall take into account

 

I am not pressed for time. I wanted this particular variation to add to my repertory, as I dont want people to get bored of seeing me dancing the same solos every time!!!

 

Silvy

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  • 3 years later...

This Wed. Sept 5 at 6pm free screening.

As the Kennedy Center’s Artistic Advisor for Ballet, Suzanne Farrell—in cooperation with the Kennedy Center and the New York Public Library for the Performing Arts—presents the premiere screening of a newly restored recording of George Balanchine’s ballet Don Quixote. This historic 1965 production stars Mr. Balanchine as the Don and Ms. Farrell as his Dulcinea.

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