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En dedans turns


Marenetha

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:yes: This is slightly embarrassing.

 

I have solid triple-quadruples, both feet, on my en dehors pirouettes. Those things are no PROBLEM - I could do them in my sleep. I get more sometimes, just by being lucky - I understand the whole transitional movement, and everything.

 

I can barely do a single en dehors pirouette, though. I don't entirely understand how the weight is supposed to be transferred - it's not like en dehors, where you think up and down, that much. My weight gets incredibly tilted off balance somehow, from that lunge position, rather than a fourth.

 

My question is: could anyone help me out, here, with the transfer of wait? I am incredibly confused (plus this is affecting attitude, arabesque, a la seconde pirouettes, as well. I wind up with like, three-quarter arabesque turns. It's embarrassing.)

 

Thank you!

 

Amanda

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Guest waterwerty

I'm not sure if the teachers want another student to reply to this one, BUT what i have found that has helped me a lot is to imagine my inside shoulder pushing out, and spotting faster than you might think you should helped me. Now this is problably different for every person, but it is worth a try

Good luck! :yes:

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  • Administrators

Actually, werty, we do ask that at least one of the moderators answer all technical questions first, and then, if students have found something that works for them they may post it.

 

For en dedans pirouettes, the first thing is to learn to get centered over the supporting leg. Whether you get there by going straight from the lunge to the retiré, or by doing a dégagé into the relevé, you have to get there by moving your body weight into that front leg and then up on top of it. Then you must determine where you are going and where your spot is so that you can get ALL THE WAY there before you finish. Since en dedans turns are really a quarter of a turn more than en dehors, they are generally a bit more difficult. You have to change your spot from the croisé lunge to the other corner of your square where you finish. This means that a single turn is really a one and a quarter turn, a double a two and a quarter, etc. Which also means a bit more force needed, and a definite awareness of bringing the left side around that corner when turning to the right, and the right side around for the left. Practice it with a promenade to find your center and feel what you have to do to go around! :yes:

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All right, Ms. Leigh - I'll try it with the promenade, to get my balance a little better. I think I tend to either not go on enough, or overcompensate, and fall. (It's sad - I print out replies to my questions to remind me about stuff. :lol: ) Thank you!

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  • Administrators

Not sad at all, Marenetha! It DOES help to write things down and keep notes of corrections and/or answers to questions, and check on them before class to remind you what to think about that day. :lol:

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Our teacher has us do all en dedans turns, no matter what position, by taking the shoulders around as much as possible before the foot leaves the floor, which seems to bring me back around to the front as long as i keep taking the shoulder around through the turn. Most other teachers say to always turn as a whole, which this theory seems to counteract, but it actually keeps your body moving as a whole just in a more kinetically productive position and with a different energy, in my opinion.

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  • Administrators

The motivating energy for the turn, from the back muscles and from the push into the front leg, does start before the relevé. You just have to be careful not to go too far or it will not be coordinated. Nothing is totally "in one piece" when you are in movement, however it must be totally coordinated in terms of whatever movement it is and what the kinetic motivation is. Sounds like your teacher is on the track of that, Constanza :wub:

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That's interesting. ... I just read what you wrote, ConstanzaElizabeth, and really ... I DO try and keep myself perfectly even in a turn, shoulders over hips et al. It's certainly not a problem en dehors, but I might like to keep that in mind for en dedans. Thanks!

 

Amanda

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