Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers
Sign in to follow this  
Guest pointe

Career Change...?

Recommended Posts

Guest pointe

This is totally off topic in this board, but I'm really confused. confused.gif I have love ballet since from Day One I started at the age of 12. Currently I'm not active in ballet (but still very much IN LOVE with it) due to recuperation from foot surgery last Sept.

 

I'm actually a working adult, as a MIS officer with a huge travel company in the country I come from. I always surf the Net when I have the free time and just yesterday I had come across the Chartered Society of Physiotherapists (based in UK) web site.

 

I was browsing their site and suddenly I had this sort of sense of calling...probably THIS is I'm actually destined to be. I always have this desire to work with dancers, due to the fact that I cannot be one myself; but I love to contribute positively to other dancers' achievements.

 

I was educated in the Arts/Business stream up to university level (Bachelor's degree) prior to securing the job that I'm currently holding. Right now, my mind is boggling to the fact that I should answer this sense of calling. I'm keen of going into Physiotherapy especially specializing Dance Medicine.

 

I've done some research on physio course on the Net. For example, my tertiary education alma mater (Curtin University, Australia) offers a course in BSc. (Physiotherapy), a 4 year course at AUD 17 300 per year on tuition fees only.

 

I would love to return to Australia to study full-time but I have financial constraints and I'm not an A student to secure scholarships to further my studies. Also, my parents MIGHT object because it's like starting all over again (time is a factor to them). My parents would prefer me to further my education on in the field related to my job, i.e. Information Technology, but I seem to have lost interest in business related courses. Local university physio course will most likely be out of the question due to very limited no. of students they can only take each year.

 

I'm at lost here, I will speak to my PT but she's out of town at the moment and will only return next week.

 

I hope that someone may enlighten me on this issue. I REALLY need help! confused.gif

 

~pointe~

 

[This message has been edited by pointe (edited March 14, 2001).]

Share this post


Link to post
Victoria Leigh

Pointe, I really think that you will get more response for this post on the Adult Ballet Student's board. We have a number of people from Britain and Australia there, and several are also University students and doctoral candidates. Therefore, I am moving this post over there!

Share this post


Link to post
Victoria Leigh

Pointe, with the amount of determination and courage you have shown so far, to come through all that you have told us about, I bet you can do anything you really want to do!

 

I like your idea of going into Dance Medicine or therapy very much, and I really hope you can find a way to do it. It sounds like you have a good job right now, so what if you spend a couple of years with that and really save your money towards going back to school a bit later? Perhaps you could be taking some courses in the meantime that would lead towards the work you want to do. You are still very young, and while it might take a bit longer this way, it's never too late to go for what you REALLY want! smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Kate B

Can you train part-time? I would like to do more university stuff too and in Britain most university courses can be done part-time, so they cost half as much but take twice as long, if you see what I mean. This is very helpful if you are financially constrained. I don't know if you have an 'Open University' on the other side of the world but that's a good option too if you have one. Both allow you to carry on working and earning whilst working towards an academic goal.

 

I don't think it is ever too late to change your career. It is an excellent thing to chase your dream. I wish you all the best.

Share this post


Link to post
Xena

I agree with Kate, if you can try and get on a part time course, then you can carry on working , perhaps your employers may give you time off each week. At least then you will be able to afford the course and living expenses.

I am not sure what the Australian system is...also, it might be a good idea to try and contact someone in the physiotherapy profession, either through friends or a career centre, and try to arrange to spend perhaps a day with them actually seeing what the job is like. Also, another good idea is to talk to the university lecturers who would take this course. You could go and speak with them and find out as much as you can and if it is 100 % what you want to do.

 

The main piece of advice is to find out as much as you can..the pros and the cons of what you want to do, then YOU decide. It might not be an easy choice to make, but sometimes taking a slight risk, is worth it in the end, but it really has to come from you, no one should tell you otherwise, as whatever decision you take you will have to live with, so make sure it is the right one for you and not someone else..if you see what I mean?

Jxx

Share this post


Link to post
Guest pointe

I have the same mindset as most of you are, but being an Asian and growing up the Asian society proved to have a lot of challenges in terms of doing things in a different way, especially out of the stereotypical norm. My parents, especially my Mom is still quite firmly in the conservative mindset. My Dad, he is not so bad, but regarding this 360 degrees change of career, he might not like it; after he had spent so much money to put me through uni.

 

But I'll still try my best to really do I want in my career...I'd like to thank each and everyone of you who've answered my message for your valuable advice and opinions. smile.gif

 

~pointe~

Share this post


Link to post
Mel Johnson

Pointe, nothing is ever lost, and your experience as an information specialist could prove invaluable to you as a physiotherapist! There is not a logical disconnect from what you're doing now, to your ultimate goal. And since you're working in the "real world" now, those scholarships might just be easier to come by than you think, based on life experience. I say go for it! smile.gif

Share this post


Link to post
Xena

Pointe, i totally understand, having many Asian friends I can see what pressures their family put on them. As Mel said scholorships may actually be a bit easir for you to obtain having worked outside of the academic cicrle. They often ask on application form for work experience and you can put loads for that.

But do your research and then sit down with your parents and discuss this. Don't say this is what I'm doing and live with it...if they see you have thought about this seriously they will listen. But you have to listen to your parents as well..sometimes you think they are stopping you from carrying out your lifes dreams, when in fact they aren't. Don't forget that they love you and only want the best etc etc and if in the end you decide that doing dance therapy is the best for you, then they will understand, even if they don't at first.

Jxx

Share this post


Link to post
Kate B

Pointe, I think Xena's right. I don't know if the pressure is any greater whatever your background though.

 

I started on a course in computer science at university, after my mother had put a second mortgage on the house to pay for my school fees and to give me maintenance for university. The problem was, I hated computers, and I had to drop out of university. My family were very annoyed and said I would not get any more help from them. I therefore had to prove to them that I would not be wasting my life with a change to history, and I put myself through two years of part-time study to get into Edinburgh university to do history. Once I'd proved I was serious, they were very happy for me and gave me all the support they could.

 

It was a difficult two years proving that I was serious, but now I'm in my final year, I could not be happier and my family are very proud of me, not only because my grades are good, but also because I proved that I could support myself and chase my dream on my own.

 

It is vital to keep talking to your family. They might not like what you are doing at first (mine said history was 'mickey-mouse and that I should stick with computers because that's where the money and security is) but they will come round in the end, because, as Xena says, they love you and want to see you happy.

Share this post


Link to post
Guest felursus

Pointe, I am a physiotherapist here in the US. I suggest that you look at the prospectus of the course at Curtin Univ. you want to take (and investigate as many other universities as possible). As you already have a degree, you should check to see if there are any overlapping requirements. Also you may be able to take some of the science courses outside of the formal program. It's hard for me to comment more specifically, because the Australian education system is different to the one in the US. Here one would be able to transfer "credits" (up to a point) from one program to another. You need to check up on what the specific courses are that you will need to take (especially the sciences - like biology, chemistry, physics, anatomy and physiology), because these are courses that apply to many different degree programs. Investigate being able to fulfil these requirements by going to school part time. That way you can continue to work. In the US many PT programs don't accept students until the third year of a 4-5 year program. The students have to fulfil all the prerequisites before entering the 2-3 year long professional phase of the program. Contact the Australian Physiotherapy Assn. Contact the universities. They may be delighted to have a more mature student. Good luck!

Share this post


Link to post
Guest pointe

Thank you so, so much for your advice and opinions. This sense of calling has been lingering in me for a week now...I guess it's really a sign for me to move on.

 

Furthermore, there are changes in my office (not to good for me, because my company is full of hypocrites (SP?)), which probably will speed up the process of me losing interest in the current job I'm holding. I will only work because I needed the income and nothing else.

 

The earlier I move on to this plan, the better it is for me. I look forward to a more diversed international career with my qualifications as a PT. I never expected this to happen; but it's going to be good for my future I guess I should go for it.

 

Also, careerwise in the business field is not looking good for me, as I find that this area is too saturated with people, which will definitely make success much harder than it used to be.

 

I hope that things will work out fine with minimum problems getting in my way, especially since that I've no science background.

 

~pointe~

Share this post


Link to post
Guest attitude

Pointe,

You might also want to consider The University of Sydney. They offer a Bachelor of Health Science, Physiotherapy off-shore and it's based in Singapore so it's a little bit closer to home for you. What's more is that the course is offered part-time. The only catch is that it requires a Diploma in Physiotherapy from a particular Uni in Singapore. Anyway, here's a a link:

http://ptwww.cchs.usyd.edu.au/HomeSite/asp...fault_flash.asp

Share this post


Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Sign in to follow this  

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...