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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Photos: Galleries?


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www.pictage.com  also has dance photos.  The images often change every 60 - 90 days.  They are avaiable for purchase as well.

 

Pictage.com seems to be dedicated to wedding photography. I couldn't find a single dance image.

 

King

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  • 10 months later...
Over on Ballet Talk, a photographer (his alias is King) has posted a link to his website of dance pictures: Pose/Repose: The Dance Photographs of King Douglas.  There are some lovely pictures in this collection!

 

If you want to read other posters' responses, here is the link to the thread.

 

Amazing photos -- started looking up the dancers and what had happened to them since and eventually found myself being pointed back to Ballet Talk!

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Very lovely photos. But if your workplace is like mine, don't view at work on your lunch break (nudity).

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Very lovely photos.  But if your workplace is like mine, don't view at work on your lunch break (nudity).

 

Thanks for the kind words, but you may want to explain what you mean by "nudity." If you mean "showing some skin," then I won't argue. If by "nudity" you mean something of an explicit, sexual or pornographic nature, then I disagree entirely.

 

The 46 photos are from a one-artist exhibition at Southern Methodist University and are presented in approximately the same order as they were in the gallery. The Dallas Morning News gave the exhibition the cover of its Sunday The Arts section (including one of the so-called nudes). The photos in question are early in the presentation. Photos of Susanne Farrell, Peter Martins, Rudolph Nureyev, Natalia Makarova and others (fully dressed!) are displayed later. There is an index where you can look up and select your choice of images--you don't have to view the entire gallery.

 

The "nudity" in my dance gallery is very modest and limited and does not and would not offend anyone in my very conservative office at American Airlines...nor would it offend or embarrass the family or loved ones of those photographed. To quote Eleanor Bernard Carney, one of the dancers who appears in two of the photos containing what you refer to as "nudity,"

 

"King - Wow I feel so honored to be on your website!"

 

The only real nudity in my dance collection is a thumbnail copy of the famous Rudolph Koppitz photograph of modern dancers, which was my inspiration for one of the photos.

 

I invite others to decide for themselves whether your warning was necessary--and let me know, please.

 

Regards,

 

King Douglas

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My art teachers would always explain there is a difference between nude and naked. Michelangelos David is a nude, the people on playboy are naked.

 

unfortunately, in the workplace, usually neither is appropriate.

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These are simply . . . exquisite!

 

Thanks, Dancemaven. Please pardon this additional attempt to explain my work, which I very much want to share with others. The exhibition, overall, was inspired by two photographs I took years ago that have something in common. The first, Clive Thompson in Alvin Ailey's "Hermit Songs."

Clive Thompson

 

The second, a rehearsal photo of The Boston Ballet's Anamarie Sarazin as Lizzie Borden in Fall River Legend, with Elaine Bauer as the ghost of her mother.

Anamarie Sarazin

 

Both images capture, I think, a great deal of emotion in the faces and upper bodies of the dancers. "Hermit Songs" portrays a crucifixion while the photo of Annie and Elaine is reminiscent of a Pieta.

 

Over 35 years ago I became interested in portraying dancers from the waist up, in images that convey emotion. What I wanted to show is what all mature artists know...that dancing is about so much more than turnout, beautiful feet, hyperextended legs, high extensions, etc. I wanted to demonstrate that moving, inspiring and beautiful dance photographs can be created in the studio--in a collaboration between dancer and photographer--without reference to costumes, sets, famous or well-known choreography and, yes, without having famous dancers as subjects.

 

I'm satisfied that I was at least partially successful in this effort that took years to accomplish and I'm very gratified that you seem to get what I was attempting to do.

 

Thanks again,

 

King Douglas

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I loved looking at the photographs on your site; they are beautiful! :) I would have appreciated some warning before clicking on the link though because I am a younger member of this website and would have preferred to make a choice about what I wanted to view rather than being caught by suprise. (I understand that none of the pictures were taken for inappropriate purposes). Anyway, I did enjoy the lovely pictures. :yucky:

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I loved looking at the photographs on your site; they are beautiful! :)  I would have appreciated some warning before clicking on the link though because I am a younger member of this website and would have preferred to make a choice about what I wanted to view rather than being caught by suprise. (I understand that none of the pictures were taken for inappropriate purposes). Anyway, I did enjoy the lovely pictures.  :yes:

 

Well, I learned something new. When folks entered the university gallery to look at my exhibit, they could go straight or turn to the right or the left. They could look at the images in any order.

 

That's not the case with an online gallery. Although the order makes design sense, the first 12 of 49 pages feature dancers who are undressed from the waist up (which is not uncommon for men onstage--and the females maintain their modesty). One could get the impression that the entire exhibition is of the same theme, which it is not. The other 37 pages are rehearsal and performance photographs or studio photos of a more conventional nature.

 

I don't know what I'm going to do about this. To rearrange a 49-page online gallery will take a lot of work and time. My two wonderful children, who are now 24 and 27, have viewed these photos since they were babies. Neither they nor their dancer mother have ever considered any of the photos immodest--so I'm taken a bit off guard here.

 

I'm glad you enjoyed the photos and thanks very much for giving me your opinion.

 

King Douglas

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My 13 year old dd and I enjoyed looking at the pictures. Maybe toedancer's surprise was at the 1926 photograph that was the inspiration for King's photographs. It was more explicit than any of his pictures. I would have no trouble viewing any of King's photographs at my workplace.

 

Betsy

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I have finally taken the time to look through the photos.

Very nice!

(I _think_ that I recognise one of the dancers featured from my time at ballet school eons ago. It is so neat to see what has become of people one once knew!)

 

I was not at all bothered by any "nudity", and my children weren't, either.

 

-d-

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On the other hand, remember that all workplaces are not the same, and viewing ANYTHING not directly related to your job could possibly land you in hot water. So be sneaky! :devil:

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