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Ballet Talk for Dancers

levels in adult ballet?


amatol

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I have seen mention RAD levels and similar for kids and teenagers taking ballet but how does one judge progress in most adult classes? Is there any standard definition of beginner or intermediate class or even advanced? Or is it just variable depending on the studio/teacher?

 

Mainly wondering as I was thinking of trying out some other ballet studios (I love mine just interested in seeing different teaching styles) and really not sure how to judge what level I am at. I know the best method is probably just to show up and hope I'm not over my head or completely bored (though I can always work on basics so less of a worry)... but I'm now a bit curios what exactly intermediate would generally entail.

 

hope that didn't sound all jumbled :(

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I think it is totally depends on the school how levels are labeled. Plus, one year all the "intermediate" students might be more of a beginning-int level, another year they might be more "int/advanced", just based on that particular group of students. So who knows???

 

That said, I think a good way is to call the school and ask. You can tell them how many years you've studied and how many classes a week you've been taking, which can give them an idea. Sometimes schools are familiar with each other, and if you said "I take the level 3 at school X" they'll know what that means, though this can be dangerous because you might get a tirade of "oh, school X is so terrible, you should come here" or something equally uncomfortable.

 

Showing up is another good way. Get a schedule, see what classes are at times that work for you, and guess. If the school only has one level on a day/time that works, try that one. :dry:

 

jayo

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Guest Lizzie 37
I have seen mention RAD levels and similar for kids and teenagers taking ballet but how does one judge progress in most adult classes?  Is there any standard definition of beginner or intermediate class or even advanced?  Or is it just variable depending on the studio/teacher?

 

Mainly wondering as I was thinking of trying out some other ballet studios (I love mine just interested in seeing different teaching styles) and really not sure how to judge what level I am at.  I know the best method is probably just to show up and hope I'm not over my head or completely bored (though I can always work on basics so less of a worry)... but I'm now a bit curios what exactly intermediate would generally entail.

 

hope that didn't sound all jumbled  :dry:

I think it's a great deal like buying a dress. You know...you have a general idea of your size, then you enter a store and find out THEIR definition of a size 10. Each studio, and at times each teacher have their own definitions. Often, with established classes with a consistant group...things will be made easier or harder based on who's there that day. Often in large cities, adult beginner classes are rather more advanced than in some other areas . However...I took a class in a tiny town in Ohio once and almost died. Often receptionists have the most accurate ###### on what's going on at their studio. Many times they will ask a potential newbie a few questions about their background and be able to offer advice.

Your point about winging it works too. If it's too advanced, the teacher will recognize it. Focus on what you can do and enjoy it as a stretch experience. If it's too basic...work on fundamental elements. Enjoy

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In case you take a syllabus class, there will be no difference between the adult and the teen level.

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I don't know if this is true everywhere, but I've noticed that while levels in different cities seem to be quite different, there does seem to be some consistency within the same location. I split my time between New York and Nashville, and while I take Intermediate classes in Nashville, and Beginner classes in New York (Advanced Beginner if I'm feeling brave), I take classes at 2 or more studios in each city, and the levels seem fairly consistent...

 

But even when I've shown up for a class that's a bit over my head, I've usually managed to struggle through, often through everything except the grande allegro (which is, of course, generally my nemesis :( )

 

If there is a class you're interested in, my advice would be to just show up and give it a try... if you suspect that it might be a bit advanced for you, just mention it to the teacher before class. That way, the teacher won't be surprised if you sit out a combination or two.

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In case you take a syllabus class, there will be no difference between the adult and the teen level.

 

I think that's actually the problem there aren't really any syllabus classes offered for adults where I live (well that I've found atleast). Most of the studios seem very mixed even in the beginners level, so I have a hard time judging where I actually am at so not sure where I would place in a different studio.

 

I think the dress size comparison fits perfectly. Thanks for everyones suggestions!

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