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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Saut de basque


Danny

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Hey guys,

 

Any tips for man-sized saute de basques. Up to this point I've only chase-ed into them, low and quick across the floor. From some videos I see men practically run into them. Should I be shooting for height or travel or both? Thanks.

 

Danny

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It all depends on how the saut de basque is used! Men do low, swift ones as much as they do huge, slow-turning, or even doubles, or even beaten, yet! Yes, entering with a pas couru (step, step) is quite acceptable. When the initiating leg goes to à la seconde, that sets the height of the saut de basque. The leg doesn't come down, you come up to meet it in the air!

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Mel, you've done it again - defined a movement in 10 words or less. Sometime you should start a thread and give us your pointe of view instead of merely responding to us mortals.

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Danny already knows the basic saut de basque, so more detail would be superfluous. What he was asking was how to modify his practice, and there's not much more detail to doing a big saut de basque than a small one. :)

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Guest Bryan Lawrence
Hey guys,

 

Any tips for man-sized saute de basques.  Up to this point I've only chase-ed into them, low and quick across the floor.  From some videos I see men practically run into them.  Should I be shooting for height or travel or both?  Thanks.

 

Danny

 

Danny,

From my experience, don't be too square on when you take the two steps, as you turn your shoulders at the same time as you push off the floor and do the grand battement. This has to happen at the same time as it is what gives you the force for the turn. The impetus for the turn has to come from the ground so if you turn your body too soon you will lose the impetus. Think of the turn musically. You go up as high as you can according to tempo on 1, turn, turn (2,3)and land. Use both legs to give you height; the throw and the push. On the ground, before you take off, don't expect your shoulders to be directly over your hips. If you do this, with the impetus of the preparation, your weight will be too far forward when you land and you'll go head over heels. Think of your weight being back from the direction in which you are travelling. I am afraid I can't tell you how far back. This depends on the amount of power and travel in the preparation steps and how high you will be jumping. (That doesn't help much, does it?) So by rights, your body should be at an angle in the air and by the time you land (five minutes later!) you will be exactly on balance.

Happy turning! :)

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And mighty good saut de basques they will be, Danny. Mr. Lawrence was in the original Australian Ballet production of Sir Frederick Ashton's La Fille Mal Gardée as Colas, so saut de basques are part of his meat-and-potatoes.

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Thanks Mel, thanks Bryan! I'll try your suggestions in rehearsal tonight. It's amazing, I can't imagine any other venue where you get answers from the best in the business. Without paying a huge consulting fee, that is.

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