Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers

ballet on CV


Danny

Recommended Posts

This year I applied for a one-year business development program for doctoral candidates at my University. Anyway, as I updated my CV, I decided to include all the years of ballet and performances at the stuidos I perform for in the "activities" section. I couldn't believe how much conversation this stirred up. We spent much of the interview discussing the balance of school and rehearsals, the feeling of being on stage, and motivation for dance in general. The interviewers were genuinely curious and this made me feel very comfortable.

 

So, if you haven't done so already put all your dance experience on your resumes and CV's!

Link to comment

Sorry...a little off topic, but I'm at the age (18) where learning to write a resume is quite important:

 

What exactly is a CV? I know what a resume is, I know what a cover letter is, but I always see CV accompanied by these things and I never figured out what it is.

 

And I've been taught that the "activities" section should be devoted to things relevant to the job you apply for. So I'm always hesitant to put down my dance and music experience, because it has nothing to do with microbiology or whatnot.

Link to comment

From what I have seen at universities, a Curriculum Vitae is a listing of all your books, articles, and speaking engagements. It can be much longer than your resume (especially if you are a professor).

 

Since I work for a consulting company, I have a corporate resume we send out with job proposals. I hadn't thought to put any dance experience in there. I don't think they would let me, unless I could somehow convince them of its relevance.

 

I have always listed dance on resumes when applying for jobs or schools. It takes up so much of my time it would be a shame not to! Sometimes it is a nice way to break the ice with an interviewer.

Link to comment

carbosse- I worked for a company that contracts work. We often put outside interests in our bios because if all things are equal we want the company to look at it and say "wow she takes fusion kickboxing ballet cooking classes that's something I've always wanted to do. maybe I could ask her about it during a meeting."

Link to comment
Sorry...a little off topic, but I'm at the age (18) where learning to write a resume is quite important:

 

What exactly is a CV? I know what a resume is, I know what a cover letter is, but I always see CV accompanied by these things and I never figured out what it is.

 

And I've been taught that the "activities" section should be devoted to things relevant to the job you apply for. So I'm always hesitant to put down my dance and music experience, because it has nothing to do with microbiology or whatnot.

 

As an I.S. Developers (Programmers) Supervisor, I have spent some time going over quite a few CVs and I must say that activities should contain items that you are interested in (but should also be relatively short if not in direct relation to the job). While (say) 70% of the resume-reading/interview process is finding a candidate who can do the job, the other 30% is finding someone that will fit into the dept culture well and who will work well in the team. If Dancing is fundamentally part of you and your life, then it should be on there. It would make me more interested in you (as a co-worker) and would give me an avenue to explore to engage you in conversations (during the interview process). Caveat : if you list too many items that are totally unrelated, then the cv looks really awkwards and does in fact negate the effect.

 

-goro-

Link to comment

I guess the extent to which you present activities/interests is debatable. Like Carabosse said, it's such a big part of my life that it almost seems disrespectly to dismiss it. I enjoy hitting the old Playstation 2 with my roomate but this activity certainly hasn't shaped my life like ballet has.

 

Actually, I'm quite curious Hans (and anyone else who has extensive experience) how would one write up a ballet resume? Maybe principal roles, minor roles, different studios? In my case, it was bascially two lines of my three page CV.

Link to comment

Interests and activites are so important on cv's. As well as all the points listed by the others, they show that you can stick at something (something which all employers would be keen to see) and that you are comfortable in a "team-based" situation. It also helps show developed social skills. When applying for jobs, I always put the most diverse range of skills and interests I have, to show I'm adaptable to many situations (although I'm no way a professional dancer so this may be different to some of you!). Plus it takes too long to write every single performance, so again I simply state a "strong interest in ballet for x years". Oh, and in england at lest, a cv is the same as as resume. A cover letter is basically the bit directly in relation to the job you're applying for :devil:

Link to comment

My dance résumé includes my full-time ballet education, my summer training, my teaching experience, and my performing experience (not necessarily in that order). I can squeeze it on to one page. Obviously one should not include things like "Party Scene Parent--Nutcracker" but (semi-)major dancing roles (Bluebird, Siegfried, Peasant Pas de Deux) are ok.

Link to comment

I will never put ballet on my cv unless it's a arts-related job. The sad truth is that where I am (Asia) if you put your hobbies on your cv, your employer will worry that you will get off work exactly on time and refuse to do overtime when they want you to. They don't want evidence of any time-consuming hobbies that may interfere with work.

Link to comment

Sakura,

 

That must be very difficult. I actually had the same concerns early on. In fact, as an undergrad and into my first job, I was one of those people who thought hobbies detracted from school/work. Now, come Spring performance time I'm out of the office constantly. If it's a long day of blocking I just use some vacation time.

Link to comment

It's nice to know that there are employers who care about the activities section. I always felt that I wasn't doing myself justice when I don't include activities that I've put much heart and effort into but don't pertain to the job. In the end, I guess it wouldn't really matter if you include it. Interested employers could make a conversation out of dance. Disinterested ones would just ignore it. They can't not hire you just because you dance in your spare time, right? :(

Link to comment

I would never put my dance expereince on my CV. Not only am I not sure how employers would receive it, I typically do not share my dance interests at work.

 

I met one of my dancing partners at a industry event (we both work in the same hi-tech field) It was the first time she saw me in a business suit and not in tights or costume.

 

Cheers,

 

Mike

Link to comment

Well, I guess if a person dances alot and takes many classes a week, it would actually be a good thing to sound the future employer about it (maybe in a section like "personal interests and hobbies" in the CV?).

 

I would rather my employer be well aware of my other commitments (if they are substantial enough) after working hours, and hire me happily and willingly right from the start, than to risk misunderstandings and unrealistic expectations from each other in the future :thumbsup:

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...