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Ballet Talk for Dancers

frappes


dancetolive

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i was just wondering what do frappes do for you???

 

 

 

 

 

 

victoria

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Frappés have different purposes, depending on how they are executed. The kind that strikes the floor is for knee and ankle flexibility, and foot strength. The kind that maintains a pointed foot works primarily the knee joint. They are all used to build speed for petite allegro and fast footwork, and of course they reinforce the use of the rotators. Pointed foot ones also work on the cou de pied positions.

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Wow! I never knew that the two types of frappes had different purposes. Frappe means "to srike" so I was wondering, when you do the pointed foot version, what do you strike?

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Good question :wink: But, that is the way they do them, exclusively in some methods. Actually, I use both, as they seem to have different purposes. :)

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Ms. Leigh, I didn't know that they had different puposes! At some of my schools, they preffered the pointed frappes purely for the "professional look". But now that I know what they're for, I'm going to practice both ways!

 

baking_balletdancer

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Obviously at my school we only do the stiking the floor one; so how do you do the pointed ones?

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I teacher at my summer intensive said that when you do the pointed frappes that do not touch the floor, you are striking the air. But I like the frappes that strike the floor better. I think that the speed of frappes (your leg going out quickly) is to help for petit allegro.

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Guest dancer522

Well, you can do pointed ones that strike the floor (where you bring your foot into the sur le cou de pied position to the front and to coupe to the back), or you can do the flexed ones where you bring your foot into a flexed position on your ankle instead of into coupe/cou de pied. Then, there is the pointed kind that doesn't brush the floor (the foot goes into sur le cou de pied or coupe on the ankle and you straighten your leg without your foot touching the floor - like somebody else said, it's as though you're striking the air). The pointed no brush version is like how you would perform a pointed frappe on releve - without touching the floor (except that you also do not touch the floor while standing on flat).

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There is a difference in the ones that strike the floor too, in that the foot comes back to a relaxed, rather than a flexed, position. In the relaxed position the toes are resting on the floor. And, you can also do flex foot and pointe on demi pointe. This works the ankle joint as well as the knee, and is a great coordination exercise, especially if done very fast. :ermm: One of the biggest problems I see in frappé is when dancers bring a flexed or relaxed foot in too high. The heel should be in the front or back of the standing heel, not up on the calf somewhere!

 

PS dancers, "coupé" is a step, an action, cutting one foot away from the other, not a position. I know that many teachers call the position a coupé, but it should be cou de pied devant or derrière. :speechless: (But don't argue with them....it's hopeless!)

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