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Rhapsody

Purpose of tendu ala seconde?

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Rhapsody

At a few SI audition dd attended last year, they asked each participant to tendu ala seconde one at a time and hold while the auditioners made notes. Dd wonders why they want to see this. What does this particular pose show the auditioners. Also does it matters if you tendu with your left foot instead of your right? (She's a lefty.)

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Mel Johnson

Clairvoyance is not one of my strengths, but if I were looking at a student in pointe tendue à la seconde, I'd be looking for proper alignment and placement, mostly. I'd also be looking for a supporting leg that was straight and a supporting foot that was not rolled. Incidentally, I'd be looking at the way the working foot was pointed, and if I needed more information along that line, I'd ask the auditionee for a tendu on the other foot.

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support system

This pose has always mystified me as well, as I consider it tres unflattering to most dancers. Surely there must be another pose that would reveal as much, and not look quite so awkward.

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Mel Johnson

Frankly, no.

 

And if you really want to see a dancer to their worst advantage, watch them from directly side.

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Victoria Leigh

I totally agree that this particular position is not flattering to almost anyone. But, one can see a lot in it. I would never ask for it in a photo, as some do, though. The first thing I would look for, beyond alignment, is to see that the body weight is totally on the supporting leg, especailly if they have pointe shoes on, which allows them to stand like they have a third leg in the middle of their body. :D If I see that, it would be a strong negative mark. A sickle foot on the tendu would also be a huge negative mark against them.

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vrsfanatic

Battement tendu to the side as an audition photo is quite difficult to fake. The turn out is either there or it is not, the placement is either there or it is not, the foot is either there or it is not, the arms are either there or they are not. Certainly it is not the only thing an auditon is based on however it is a nice refresher of who is who. :D

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Rhapsody

Thank you for the feedback. Dd hoped that might be it but worried they were looking for those with banana feet only (which she doesn't have).

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Dance_Scholar_London
At a few SI audition dd attended last year, they asked each participant to tendu ala seconde one at a time and hold while the auditioners made notes.  Dd wonders why they want to see this.  What does this particular pose show the auditioners.  Also does it matters if you tendu with your left foot instead of your right?  (She's a lefty.)

 

this reminds me of the audition scene of 'The Children of Theatre Street' :)

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vrsfanatic

Just to add a further thought regarding tendu to the side or any photo in general. Remember that a personal audition will take any and every dancer much further than a video or a photograph. What is important to dance, is movement. The physical attributes are a necessary aspect however if a student is lacking in musicality and movement quality a future in ballet will be difficult. If a student is a "dancer" (I do not use that word just to describe someone who studies dance), a favorable impression will be given to qualified professionals.

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juliaelise

Can someone post a picture of a proper one? I was struggling to under stand the first part that Ms Leigh was saying about the third leg.

Thank you..

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Victoria Leigh

Juliaelise, I don't have a photo to show you, but it is really quite simple to see. If one is standing on balance on the supporting leg, there is no weight placed on the working leg at all. The working leg should be ready to lift without shifting the weight. If there is weight placed in the working leg, then the dancer is not on balance on the supporting leg and it would be like standing with a third leg in the middle of the body. One should stand on one leg without being supported by the working leg, which would put the weight in the middle like there is third leg there.

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juliaelise

Thank you very much. I now finally understand what people were talking about he third leg. One more question, I don't have perfect turnout, is it more important for the working leg to be more turned out or standing. Can the standing leg be a bit less turned out? I know hips have to be square.

Thanks again!

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Victoria Leigh

Of course one must try to be equal in rotation, however, if there has to be a teeeeny bit of sacrifice, make it the standing leg, as the working leg is the one that is noticed by most people, except teachers, first.

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