Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers

Dominican University/Lines Ballet: BFA Program


Recommended Posts

My DD has received her admittance to the Lines/Dominican BFA program for fall of 08. She is very excited about the procpects of developing her dance skills in improv while becoming a better ballet and modern dancer. We plan to visit the program this month. In the meantime we would love to hear about the BFA program and how it works for those participating in it now.

 

If the audiditon is any indication of the program itself it was her favorite! She also auditioned for UCI, NYU, UofA, Fordham, and SMU. From all the reading and research it appears that Lines is the smallest. The dance classes are with only 16 students. Each class works as a group, Freshmen stay with Freshmen and move through the program together. This is very unique in college programs. Most places you could be in classes with any grade level. Many, such as Fordham, have open classes and you could have dancers from Alvin Ailey in your daily class. That sounds exciting but i wonder if the individual attention gets watered down in an open class? Since the Lines/Domincan BFA is only a couple years old it's hard to get feedback.

 

This is a general question about earning a degree in dance, does one evaluate the dance program first and primarily? It seems that most of the time is spent in the dance department. How neccesary is it to have a broad range of academic classes like what you would have at UCI or U of A if you're mainly focused and consumed with dance?

 

This website has been very helpful in researching programs and I thank those who have taken the time to inform and help others with this task!

Link to comment
  • Replies 134
  • Created
  • Last Reply

Top Posters In This Topic

  • dancemaven

    27

  • tutu2you

    6

  • Mconti

    6

  • 2busy

    6

Gentle Reminder: Please do post any experiences/information about the BFA program in the appropriate thread in the Colleges/University forum. :wink:

 

My daughter was in the trainee program (LBSET) for the fall sememster, rather than the Dominican program. she has nothing but good things to say about Lines, she just came to the difficult decision that she wants to pursue a career in science/ premed rather than dance--with dance being more an activity. She went to a performance of the BFA kids and tells me Dominican has a nice campus. , and that the dancers were very good.

Link to comment

My dd and I visited this beautiful campus and spoke with the woman in charge of the BFA program. She was most helpful, open and honest. She answered email questions quickly. My understanding of this program is that the dance is it. The academics at Dominican are quite good from our research, but the dancers are so involved with dancing that their academics work around their dance. The fact that Dominican is so small, makes it difficult for the dancers to have much choice in the classes that they take. So, in my opinion, this is a program where you must evaluate the dance first because this is the main focus of the program.

Link to comment

We have been talking with the addmissions department also and while they don't have a wide range of classes I understand you're able to take classes at the other local colleges like Sonoma or UC Berkeley and it will most likely be transferable. But like you say, there won't be a lot of time academics! We are scheduled to see the campus in April. By then all other addmission results should be in.

Link to comment
  • 4 months later...

Cordelia, this program will have its third class entering this August. Each of the three classes has roughly 15 dancers or less, so of those (roughly) 45 dancers, there may not be a large contingent of BT4D members among them.

 

That being said, I know of at least one BT4D member who is a member of the Freshman class 2008-2009. Classes don't start until August 25th. Perhaps once things get underway that member (and others if there are any) will find some time to post some information about this school and BFA program for us 'inquiring minds' who 'want to know'.

 

In the meantime, are there specific areas of inquiry you are interested in learning more about?

Link to comment
  • 4 months later...

I'm very curious about the qualitative differences between the Dominican/Lines BFA program and the Lines Ballet Training Program (formerly LBSET). Since the two share the same overall philosophy and faculty, it's an interesting case, and perhaps a starting point for a more general discussion about the merits and characteristics of pursuing dance within the context of college.

 

Do the two programs simply attract different kinds of dancers, with different goals and focus (the group mentality is different in each)? I would imagine that the 2-year Training Program has a much higher turnover, for instance, and that the group is less cohesive. But are there different expectations for each program?

 

I guess what I'm really getting at is, what would you miss out on by pursuing dance and college serially, or independently (say, studying at a college or university while taking dance at a nearby studio, or taking a few college courses while either dancing professionally or training full time)? What's the magic that happens when the two are put together in one place?

Link to comment

Dear BAT

You bring up some good questions about college and ballet. I thought I'd let you know what I discovered as my daughter is in her first year at Lines/BFA.

 

I too wondered which made more sense, to find a good dance program near a good college or look for a combo. In short, I learned two things, doing them seperately is more costly. I did not have that luxury. Secondly, the BFA program can be more enriching as the students are of a like mind. The unity of a BFA program brings together similar concerns and goals which are worked on as a team, deeping their friendships and making the process more social. My daughter came to dance late and she wanted a group that had a similar maturity.

 

She auditioned for several, 12 or so dance programs and she found the spirit and style of LINES to be most inspiring making her final decison very easy. Each program we looked at had very distinct differences in the way they approach dance. It was an exhausting process but she is very happy that she took the time to look around and feels that this program really works for her.

 

Once you start talking to the folks at the different programs you can start defining their differences. Set up a chart and keep lists. We had two lists, one for doing dance outside of college and one with the BFA/BA. The websites are helpful too, but once we narrowed it down a bit and she started to audition she was able to identify what best suited her.

Yours

fa

Link to comment
  • 1 month later...

I have a couple questions for dancers/parents who have experience with the program.

What is the current transportation situation from Dominican to LINES?

I have heard that the neighborhood where the studios are, is not great...do you have any safety concerns?

Thanks!

Link to comment

This year, the college has scheduled a bus to transport the dancers to/from the city studios. The freshmen have classes in the city twice a week. I don't remember how many days the sophmores do; and I think the juniors have 4 days in the city. When the dancers are not in the city, they have their classes at a local studio about a 5-10 minute walk from campus.

 

The bus picks the dancers up at the cafeteria building on campus.

 

Short answer to the question whether the location of the San Francisco Dancer Center (7th & Market) where they take class is in a bad area of town: Yes, it is in what is considered a 'bad area' or more properly 'seedy'. Actually, it is right on the edge. A few block (5-6) in one direction, however, is Union Square--a very upscale shopping area and very lively. Across the street is the new civic center. So, during the day, it is quite busy.

 

The building has a manned operator and has closed gates to the upper floors. So, there is security. Folks can't just wander about. Yes, there is a packaged liquor store right next door---where the dancers sometimes stop in to pick up snacks, pops, bottled water, Tylenol, Advil, etc. The owner washes down the sidewalk out front often to discourage 'loitering'. San Francisco is a colorful and interesting city. The 'goodness'/badness of a neighborhood can change within a matter of blocks, then change back just as abruptly. Some areas have one character in the day and a completely different one at night.

 

Do I worry about my dancer's safety? No more than usual. Common sense and awareness is in order---just like anywhere else. They learn rather quickly (and have lots of people to help them understand the situation) about where it is safe to go and when, and how to be safe.

 

For more comments, observations, experiences with the location of the city studios used by Lines, check the other Lines threads (SI, LBSET). Others have commented on this concern.

Link to comment
Short answer to the question whether the location of the San Francisco Dancer Center (7th & Market) where they take class is in a bad area of town: Yes, it is in what is considered a 'bad area' or more properly 'seedy'

 

Not sure that too many dance institutions can afford to not be in the seedy areas. Rent there is cheaper and so are the prices of building sales. So what dancemaven has outlined is important and that is, what is done to protect the environment and dancers as much as possible. Sounds like Lines has done a decent job.

Link to comment

Cordelia, I think (but am not absolutely positive) that the dancers are picked up right after their dance classes. The dancers' academic classes are scheduled based upon when their dance class schedule ends, so really, they need to hot-foot it back to campus so as to get to their academics. Usually, their dance classess are scheduled between 9 a.m. and 2 p.m. and their academic classes are those beginning at 3 p.m. and thereafter. Of course, there are times when the class schedule stars align and the kids can arrange an academic schedule that provides big blocks of free time on one or more days.

 

Now, if the dancer doesn't need to go directly back to campus, they don't have to take the provided ('free') transportation. They can choose to stay in the City for whatever reason and make their own arrangements to get back to campus. There are at least three options: Bart, Golden Gate Transit, Metro bus and ferry combination. Or something like that. It is approximately an 1 1/2 public transportation trip one-way versus about a 30 minute 'direct' transportation---all depending on traffic and time of day, of course.

 

There are many reasons a dancer might need/want to stay in the City if he/she has the time: shopping needs, medical appointments, yoga classes, pilates classes, gyro classes, open classes, performance viewing opportunities, etc. They are college kids, so they have the freedom to make decision for themselves.

Link to comment

Thanks for all the great, current information. I was curious after hearing comments by other parents during auditions. Of course everyone has their own opinion. My dd has been taking class and riding the NY subway since she was 16, but this would be a new environment for her. She was intrigued with the LINES audition class and loved Ms. Hotchkiss' teaching style.

Link to comment
  • 3 months later...
Dear BAT

You bring up some good questions about college and ballet. I thought I'd let you know what I discovered as my daughter is in her first year at Lines/BFA.

 

I too wondered which made more sense, to find a good dance program near a good college or look for a combo. In short, I learned two things, doing them seperately is more costly. I did not have that luxury. Secondly, the BFA program can be more enriching as the students are of a like mind. The unity of a BFA program brings together similar concerns and goals which are worked on as a team, deeping their friendships and making the process more social. My daughter came to dance late and she wanted a group that had a similar maturity.

 

She auditioned for several, 12 or so dance programs and she found the spirit and style of LINES to be most inspiring making her final decison very easy. Each program we looked at had very distinct differences in the way they approach dance. It was an exhausting process but she is very happy that she took the time to look around and feels that this program really works for her.

 

Once you start talking to the folks at the different programs you can start defining their differences. Set up a chart and keep lists. We had two lists, one for doing dance outside of college and one with the BFA/BA. The websites are helpful too, but once we narrowed it down a bit and she started to audition she was able to identify what best suited her.

Yours

fa

 

 

My daughter applied for the program but was not accepted. Do you have any suggestions as to what she could do at this point to increase her chance of acceptance were she to audition again?

Link to comment

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.


×
×
  • Create New...