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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Switching Studios


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Guest kat789

I am currently at a local dance studio that is (to say the least) disheveled. I just moved away from a great school and this current one isn't exactly what I'm used to. The dance studio is a trailer, half of the floor is too curvy to dance on, and schedules change every couple of seconds. I tried to look beyond these problems because some of the dancers are beyond talented. But I don't see any improvement in myself as I am more worried about slipping on the floor or hitting the short ceiling then my technique. About half an hour away there is an accredited school that I feel more comfortable dancing in with magnificent studios.

 

Here's the dilemna: If I go to the new studio 30 minutes away, the friends that I have made at my local studio will probably stop being nice to me because these 2 studios are extremely competitive. Once the girls (including the teachers) spent half an hour talking badly about the other studio. I believe that I will improve more at the other studio, not the local one. Can anybody give me some advice on this decision?

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" If I go to the new studio 30 minutes away, the friends that I have made at my local studio will probably stop being nice to me"

 

Then they aren't your friends, are they?

 

 

Do what you think is right and don't let anybody stop you. You will make new friends at the new studio, if you change.

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  • Administrators

I TOTALLY agree with Winifred on this. Do you want to be a dancer, or is it more important to keep the people who you think are friends, who really are not if they won't be friends once you change studios?

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I Once the girls (including the teachers) spent half an hour talking badly about the other studio. I believe that I will improve more at the other studio, not the local one.

 

You've already answered your own question. Any place where both the students AND teachers think it is a productive use of class time to "bad-talk" another studio simply hasn't got its priorities straight. Why would you want to even be a part of such a place? Something is seriously missing from such a 'studio'.

 

Run, don't walk, to the more focused studio!

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Guest kat789

I do understand that my education is more important then a few sore friends, but in such a small studio I don't know how I'll be able to tell the girls (much less the director) that I won't be coming back next year. If the studio didn't have so many concerned mothers that would stop by my house if I didn't respond to their collection of emails, I would just keep it on the down low. However, this is not the case. One of the most active parents in the studio is a relatively-close neighbor of mine (within a short driving distance) who frequently enjoys checking up on us if I miss a class or she just wants to hear my mother's opinion on a situation. I know that I have to change to this new studio, but I would appreciate some etiquette advice on how to handle this.

-thank you for your responses-

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Smile sweetly, and say, "Mind your own business, dear."

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Be very careful to always take ownership of the change---much like Treefrog suggested. Whatever you say, it must be "all about you" (this time that's the ONLY way to go! :thumbsup: ) and NEVER about the studio you wish to leave.

 

Do not even hint that the studio you are leaving is unprofessional. Keep your answers VERY short and simple: "The other studio is more like my last one." "I feel more familiar there." "It's style of teaching/dancing/etc is more like where I came from."

 

Don't be drawn into a comparison between the two. If you can't avoid it, come up with some "I-only-want-to-play-baseball", politically empty philosophical reasons. The more vague (and thus, confusing), the better. Then, change the topic as quickly as possible and ask them something that will let them focus on something their studio is doing and they can be excited to talk about. Then slip away from dance topics as smoothly and covertly as possible.

 

 

Good Luck! :thumbsup:

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Good luck, Kat! I was lucky. My daughter was over-danced and we were told by a chiropracter that she needed to rest. I had been driving 40 miles for times a week for seven years and it was killing both of us. The dance teacher couldn't argue with the chiropracter. Then when we got stuck (only for a month, thank goodness!) in a Dolly Dinkle school, the lessons went on till 9.30 p.m and she had homework and needed to eat, I just pulled her out and said she couldn't do so many late nights, and homework, and sent her to a much better school in the same time that keeps proper hours! Fiz. xxx

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Guest kat789

Just updating-

 

Unfortunately, I am having mixed feelings about this new studio. An acquaintance of mine goes to this school and was put onto pointe before she was ready (physically and emotiionally). The senior class is required to wear all the same pointe shoes, no matter whether your feet were wide, narrow, or highly/lowly arched. The artistic director also pushes the students to go to YAGP every year (starting at age 9) because she wants them to go to residence schools. When a young 11 year old had a meeting with the teacher and parents, the teacher insisted on a residence program right away. If this artistic director is so confident about her teaching, then why would she be pushing boarding school? It is an exception, however, when the pupil exceeds what the school can offer, training wise. Any thoughts?

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  • Administrators

Is this school the only choice? Did you move too far from the former school that you said was a great school?

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It doesn't sound like you're too excited about either of these schools. I went to a studio for 10 years (I think the type has been refered to as a Dolly Dinkle school) and I wasn't getting the right training, I wasn't improving, and I'd leave class every week (yes, only one class per week per type at that studio) in tears. If you really love dancing, find someplace that you love. Find someplace were you want to go to class and you don't want class to end. Also, try to figure out what you really want and what is best for YOU. Sure, there were some talented girls at my old studio, and a lot of people found it just fine, but as soon as I switched schools, I started to improve so much, not only in my technique, but also in my attitude towards dance. I hope you are successful in finding someplace that fits. It sounds like good studios are hard to find in your area (I know the feeling, I live in a small town in Iowa. Need I say more?). Good luck!

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Guest kat789

I moved about 650 miles away from my old studio and they do not offer a residence program, so this is not an option :D But at least my family can pay the big ballet bills (the infamous 3 B's)! This may be competely out of the ballpark, but would it work to take 1 class at the other studio 30 min. away and 5 at the local studio? Would that suffice for training? Or would it not be of any help since the training isn't what I need? Should I pursue other dance education options (such as boarding schools), even though my parents strongly believe against it?

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