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WaltzingThroughMyDreams

The class I viewed was Level V, which is considered Advanced Ballet. In total, the program offers six levels, ranging from Beginning Ballet to Advanced Ballet with Pointe.

 

For those interested, here is a link to the course listing for the Dance Department:

 

http://www.college.columbia.edu/bulletin/d...php?tab=courses

Edited by WaltzingThroughMyDreams

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dance_through_life

I noticed on the schedule that Ballet V only meets M W F and Ballet VI only meets M T W Th... is there a way to take a combination of the two that would result in class 5 days a week? Or does the department only allow the less rigorous schedules?

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WaltzingThroughMyDreams

Dance_through_life, I have some questions about scheduling myself, but I won't be able to work these out until registration for classes during September. Since classes in the dance department are viewed in the same way as academic classes (not to mention that students receive grades on their transcripts for dance classes), I don't think it would be possible to attend all of the Ballet V classes and two of the Ballet VI classes per week, for example, but there may be other possibilities I am unaware of. Of course, I'm sure that many serious students supplement their college dance classes with other open classes in New York City.

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dance_through_life

Ok, thanks anyway for the quick response!

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WaltzingThroughMyDreams

Just a quick update after class registration/first week of classes:

 

First of all, it is possible to register for more than one section of ballet (or modern, etc.) in order to create a more demanding dance schedule. However, it is of course somewhat difficult to schedule multiple dance classes in addition to pre-registered core classes (that may conflict with dance classes and are difficult, if not impossible, to move) and various other academic classes (both electives and major-related classes).

 

Personally, my schedule includes two dance classes that meet a total of four days a week, which is less demanding than my dance schedule during high school. However, NYC offers many open classes that can be taken to supplement a college dance schedule for the more "serious" dancer. (Steps on Broadway is only a 20-minute subway ride from 116th St.)

 

If anyone has any questions or comments, I will certainly respond to the best of my knowledge!

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nutmeg

Thank you so much for taking time out of what I'm sure is a busy registration week to keep us informed. If you wouldn't mind, I would love to hear your impressions throughout the year: both about the ballet program and about the school in general. Good luck!!

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WaltzingThroughMyDreams

Just posting her to say that there's a good discussion of the Barnard/Columbia dance department going on in the Barnard thread. If anyone is looking for more information, you can go there!

 

If any of the moderators see this, I am wondering if the Barnard and Columbia threads should be merged? Obviously, the admissions are separate, but since the dance department is one and the same most of the questions asked in the Barnard thread are relevant to Columbia and vice versa. Just a suggestion!

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BAT

Waltzing -- or any other current students: I'm wondering if you can update us on the ins and outs of dance at Columbia. Has the core curriculum made fitting dance classes into your schedule difficult? Have you had any interaction with the student-run Columbia Ballet Collaborative? Any details would be welcome!

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socalgal

The dance department may be one and the same. But Columbia Ballet Collaborative is a Columbia student group led by Columbia University students from G.S.

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atutulover

Here's a link to another article that provides additional background: Timeout New York article by Gia Kourlis

(Not sure I did this like properly: Mods, please correct if I did it wrong). Also, Columbia Ballet Collaborative has established a Facebook page.

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WaltzingThroughMyDreams
Waltzing -- or any other current students: I'm wondering if you can update us on the ins and outs of dance at Columbia. Has the core curriculum made fitting dance classes into your schedule difficult? Have you had any interaction with the student-run Columbia Ballet Collaborative? Any details would be welcome!

 

Scheduling in general is difficult, but somehow it works out in the end if you're determined to fit it all in! The core isn't a problem, since all the core classes (Lit Hum, CC, etc.) have multiple sections and meet at various times. The issue is usually if you need a class for your major and it happens to be at the same time as a dance class you want to take :innocent:http://www.college.columbia.edu/bulletin/d...php?tab=courses If you look around the bulletin of classes, you can get a sense of how scheduling might work. I manage to have ballet class 5 days a week in addition to a full courseload, so it's possible!

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Momof3darlings

Here's a link to info on Columbia Ballet Collaborative:

 

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vagansmom

Because so many ballet students end up taking at least a year off between high school and college to dance, I thought I'd post on this thread about the alternate route into Columbia University through the General Studies program rather than Columbia College. GS students are classified as either having had a year or more break in their college studies or are "nontraditional learners" who've spent their non-college time pursuing something else to a high degree. The biggest group among them is ballet dancers. There are many former ballet apprentices, trainees and full company members among the GS group from year to year. In fact, the GS program has been nicknamed "Tutus and Uzis" by some (the second largest group is veterans).

 

Other than separate social functions due to age differences, there are no real distinctions between the younger set (CC students) and GS. Their classes are not separate nor are their grades any different. They are graded together. GS students receive the same degrees as CC students. I say all of this because the dean of the GS program once mentioned the need to dispell rumors that GS students are in any way undeserving of their degrees. In fact, quite a few professors have stated that they prefer the GS students because they have the maturity and the self-discipline to excel at Columbia while still maintaining a balanced view of life (their grades tend to be higher than those of the younger set too).

 

In order to get into Columbia via GS, a prospective student must submit the usual test scores: SAT or ACT, as well as a 1500 - 2000 word essay explaining what they have been doing in their years as a nontraditional learner. If they've been out of school for 8 or more years, they must retake the SAT or ACT or take Columbia's own test, the General Studies Admissions Exam.

 

Our family personally knows several GS students: some are dancers (including some whose parents used to post frequently on these boards) and two are former Olympic athletes. Some of this group needed to rely heavily on scholarship and grant monies, as did our own family member. They (all had been out of school for 8+ years) opted to take the SAT, believing that it's the hardest test. I don't know if that strategy worked, but I do know that they scored very high on the SAT's and did receive major scholarship and grant money. Those who then maintained very high GPA's continued to receive even more aid from year to year in recognition of their high academic achievements. Our family had been told by non-Columbia educators that the GS students rarely receive scholarship money, but we simply have not found this to be true nor have the other GS students we know. Columbia rewards achievement.

 

The Columbia Ballet Collaborative was created by GS students. It's a topnotch student ballet company. Most of you know that Columbia and Barnard share studio space and classes. Also, because the university is located in NYC, there are many other ways to continue dancing while taking classes at Columbia. Our dancer took classes at several studios throughout NYC.

 

I know that parents of students who do well academically in high school and on standardized tests often don't want their dancing children to take any time off between high school and college out of the fear that the chance of an Ivy League education might be lost to them forever. I think that Columbia University offers the very best way to have a ballet career and a normal undergraduate (they even have GS dorms for those who need them) experience.

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kmdmom

Thank you so much, vagansmom-- great information for those of us who are trying to figure out what happens after high school and how college fits in with a dancing career!

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purpledancer999

What's the difference between this program and Barnards? Can you apply to both?

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