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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Being over the balls of your feet


biners6

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I had my semester evaluation with my teacher yesterday, and she said that the biggest thing I need to work on is staying over the ###### of my feet and not allowing myself to sink back into my heels. She suggested that I work on strengthening my hamstrings (mine are naturally very flexible and so it's easy for me to sink into them) and also just thinking about being forward all the time, even outside of ballet class. Anyways, I had two questions about this.

First of all, say you're doing tendus to the side from first on the right side. When you tendu side, you want to have the majority of your weight on the ###### of your left foot. But then when you close, your weight should be evenly distributed between the two feet, right? How do you accomplish this without showing a huge weight change?

Second of all, how do you feel the difference between being over the ###### of your foot and sinking into your standing hip? I feel like if I'm doing something on one foot and I try too hard to get over the ###### of my feet, I end up sinking into that hip.

Thanks!

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The weight shift is a lot more subtle than that, biners. Sounds like you are moving too far over! In the tendu, if you are coming in to first and going right back out again, the weight won't shift totally to both feet. If you are making a stop in first, or a demi plié, then of course it does center itself on both feet.

 

As to sinking into supporting hip, IF you are properly lifted out of that leg, and the muscles that do that are engaged, you cannot sink! You will only sink if you let loose with the glutes and the top of the thigh muscles and shift weight too much in heel.

 

To check where you are, simply lift the supporting heel a TINY bit, like a little "release". If you have to move over to do that, you are too far back.

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