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Adult Pointe


nzdancer

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Dance Scholar London - The only separate pointe class in Cambridge that I know of is a very scary 30 minute University class. Scary for two reasons: (1) the floor is a slick, aerobics studio floor where no resin is allowed and (2) the instructors tend to be adult beginners themselves.

 

Private Cambs studios tends to give classes where girls taking a 1-hour class throw on their shoes for the last 10 minutes. In this brief time, they progress through RAD syllabus steps, sometimes at a ridiculous pace (i.e. doing the first 'warm-up' eschappe barre excercise, then moving straight into the centre for the temps lie pointe excercise, followed immediately by multiple pirouettes from static positions, progressing forward in the room). One teacher I know of takes things at a far more reasonable pace. However, the girls throw on the shoes about once a month for this (these are teens mixed with adults).

 

The other, self-elected option is to use pointe shoes in technique class (I do this and take them off whenever I feel I should, e.g. when our class starts with a ridiculous 10-minute barre).

 

I've attended classes in both Oxford (1 year's time) and Cambs (6 years' time). By and large, I find both cities to be somewhat challenged on this front. But I really now think that overall, the Oxford classes are better (as scary as it is to give them a thumbs-up). :clover::blushing:

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Guest pink tights

Like Ami said, I can understand the desire. But the risk? I agree that people tend to think pain and injuries come with the territory, however broken limbs are not the norm.

 

20 minutes of dedicated pointe is the ideal--unfortunately, it's not what's happening in most situations.

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I've had several adults approach me and ask if I'd be willing to do a private lesson when thier pointe session ends for the summer. That's a great way to start a small class if none are offered through a school. Find someone who knows what they're doing, rent a studio, bring a cassette deck, and have a nice class at the right pace! I'm sure there's plenty of University students and/or financially struggling young professional dancers who'd be more than happy to teach a class or private lesson if asked.

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Good point(e) lampwick. I just finished a semi-private month of pointe classes at a studio in the city. The studio only cost $35 to rent for an hour and then the rest went into the teacher's pocket. It was a great experience!

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Dance Scholar London - The only separate pointe class in Cambridge that I know of is a very scary 30 minute University class. Scary for two reasons: (1) the floor is a slick, aerobics studio floor where no resin is allowed and (2) the instructors tend to be adult beginners themselves.

 

Private Cambs studios tends to give classes where girls taking a 1-hour class throw on their shoes for the last 10 minutes. In this brief time, they progress through RAD syllabus steps, sometimes at a ridiculous pace (i.e. doing the first 'warm-up' eschappe barre excercise, then moving straight into the centre for the temps lie pointe excercise, followed immediately by multiple pirouettes from static positions, progressing forward in the room). One teacher I know of takes things at a far more reasonable pace. However, the girls throw on the shoes about once a month for this (these are teens mixed with adults).

 

The other, self-elected option is to use pointe shoes in technique class (I do this and take them off whenever I feel I should, e.g. when our class starts with a ridiculous 10-minute barre).

 

I've attended classes in both Oxford (1 year's time) and Cambs (6 years' time). By and large, I find both cities to be somewhat challenged on this front. But I really now think that overall, the Oxford classes are better (as scary as it is to give them a thumbs-up). :):crying:

 

RAD classes in London tend to be only 1 hour and fifteen minutes (though there are sometimes 90 min classes), but 1h15 is the norm and it is pretty short for technique and pointe together. When I was taking classes at the RAD Headquarter, pointe was literally reduced to 5 min as the majority of girls took already 5 min to put the shoes on.

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I've always wondered about this as well. I have been asked to go on pointe. Here is my problem... in my open adult classes its sink or swim. If they think im ready to learn...I want to start from the beginning. I haven't put on a pair of pointes in a decade. Okay...maybe I've messed around a bit on an old pair (i know bad idea) but I haven't worn a pair of pointes in an actual studio for an actual pointe class since I was a kid. The adults on pointe in my classes (they are actually all quite good) are already doing pirouettes and pique turns on pointe after only a few months on the things. That is not something I want to do. I know I am not ready for that yet.

 

In terms of readiness vs "for kicks" its really all relative. Some people mentioned that if it's an open class, and there are adults there, and you are paying for it, there is really nothing a teacher can do. However, I have seen people who aren't ready for pointe or just aren't very good at it, and eventually, they will stop trying out of sheer frustration. If your not ready....you kind of know it. If you continue on your own despite teachers discouragement, then its your fault if you get injured. If a teacher wants to teach students that are serious about it, it should be in a controlled, safe enviornment. Even if the adult isn't 100% ready but is so thrilled by the notion, going up on releve while holding onto the barre with both hands a few times after class isn't going to kill them.

 

I also think the reason why there is this whole pointe readiness issue all the time is because pointe work for prepros and teenagers and even serious adult students is a HUGE thing. You have to earn it. You have to work for it. And when your teacher finally tells you to go out and get fitted it seems that all of that hard work has paid off. And I think it's almost an "elitest" attitude pointe students have when they see a 30 something take class for a year and start dancing around in pointe shoes just for "kicks." I think they almost look at it as recreational students disrespecting something they worked so hard to get when in actuality they should be flattered that the nonpros want to emulate them.

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I'm glad to find this topic, because I may have to make a decision. Because our adult class does not have reliable attendance (sometimes 14 students, sometimes 4), my teacher is combining us with a pre-pointe class for age 11 and up next fall. On the one hand I'm kind of excited about upping the challenge level; on the other, I'm REALLY apprehensive about looking/feeling silly and slowing everyone down. :blushing:

 

I am appalled by my own narcissism, but these are the facts: a grandmother with only two years' experience and not much natural skill, I doubt I'll ever actually go on pointe since I can only take one lesson a week. That's perfectly OK with my teacher, but among all those ambitious teens who have been dancing every night since they were in diapers, I fear I'll be That Old Lady (well, One of Those Old Ladies, since at least one other grown-up is staying on) Who Can't Do Anything.

 

Is pointe a realistic goal at age 49? If not, will I just be underfoot? Can anyone other than my teachers even begin to answer these questions? I'm feeling really anxious about this. :blink:

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That's perfectly OK with my teacher, but among all those ambitious teens who have been dancing every night since they were in diapers, I fear I'll be That Old Lady (well, One of Those Old Ladies, since at least one other grown-up is staying on) Who Can't Do Anything.

 

Don't worry a bit. They might just be amused with you. You might also hear what I heard one day recently:

"Don't worry. My Mom can't do that either"

 

If the class starts blowing on past you skill wise, you will end up working harder not to be a "sinker".

If the class is wearing pre-pointe shoes, that might be fun. Then there is the prospect of:

Pretty feet.

Strong feet.

Un-damaged feet.

 

Laschwen

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Guest pink tights

[quote name='Laschwen' date='May 31 2006, 09:59 AM' post='266892')

Don't worry a bit. They might just be amused with you. You might also hear what I heard one day recently:

"Don't worry. My Mom can't do that either"

Laschwen

 

Laschwen--It's just a matter of time before I hear this...Your post made my day!!

 

 

Kasaba--if you can only take one class per week, spare yourself (your toes will thank you) the agony and just skip pointe. Pointe is not for everyone--you will live without it.

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THANKS for the moral support . . . sometimes we all need a little battement in the pants. :)

 

BTW -- what are "pre-pointe" shoes???

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[quote name='Laschwen' date='May 31 2006, 09:59 AM' post='266892')

Don't worry a bit. They might just be amused with you. You might also hear what I heard one day recently:

"Don't worry. My Mom can't do that either"

Laschwen

 

Laschwen--It's just a matter of time before I hear this...Your post made my day!!

 

 

I love that one too. :)

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Where I am people usually start pointe in Inter-Foundation RAD as it is usually integrated into technique class.As you know, Inter-Foundation pointe is all at the barre and very simple and I look forward to watching my classmates going up soon.

 

Thing is, what do adults do? My kids' class is homogenous in terms of age and training (except for moi who is not going up yet). Adult classes usually do not offer pointe and given the typical adult's poor attendence record....My teacher is open to the idea of my doing pointe if I'm strong enough but I'm a long long way off but not sure if it'll ever be possible.

 

Luckily, the thought of never doing pointe doesn't bother me much nowadays....last year's injury taught me to be cautious...plus I have other interests...I had 3 other adult classmates but they seem to have dropped out, leaving me the only adult left...hope I can keep going...*keeps fingers crossed*

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BTW -- what are "pre-pointe" shoes???

 

 

They are shankless pointe shoes. You do not go up en pointe in them but they train your feet to the feel of the real thing. There hae been lots of threads on the subject over time. Sansha, Bloch, and Grishko brands can be found online. I think Capezio has some in stores too. You would need a decent fitting for these too if you are a first timer.

I would ask your teacher if he or she thinks much of the use of these when the others go to regular pointes in your class before showing up with them.

You can see a picture of the Bloch brand on the Zappo's website. Just put in the brand Bloch in your search and go to the pointe shoes. They call them demi-pointes.

 

Laschwen

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  • 1 month later...

I went on pointe for the first time when I was WAY older than you, Sakura, but I had private classes and 4-5 classes a week. I agree with others that it is too discouraging and there is too much chance for injury if you are only taking one class per week. But if you are strong enough and have the right teaching and enough classes it could work.

 

Like you I take pre-pointe and pointe classes with young kids. It is a good exercise to not care what they think. Often I wear my pointe shoes longer than they do.

 

It is fun to ask myself, "who is my audience"? And if it is me, what do I care what others think?

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  • 2 weeks later...
It is fun to ask myself, "who is my audience"? And if it is me, what do I care what others think?

 

As in "Dance like no one's watching!"?!?!? I love it! And I need to remember it! Thanks! :)

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