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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Turnout anatomical ability


sylve'

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Dd started the summer with open fifths and ended the summer with them closed, heel to toe, no pronating, no forced knees, everything from the hips. She worked very hard to use the turnout she has. She wasn't born flexible or with the 180 turnout. She was born with an incredible amount of determination however. Don't give up just because you weren't born with a flat turnout. Isn't that relatively rare anyway?

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My daughter had her turnout evaluated one time. She found out she has more turnout on her right side than her left. Because of this, she was told she will be prone to injuries on her left side. So far, she hasn't had any injuries, thank goodness. She's constantly working to improve it.

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Guest pink tights
My dd is lucky enough to have 180 turnout in the hips (and lies in the frog to watch TV - ouch!) - however- she doesn't have the same fullness of turnout with her feet and has some shortness of the tendons in the calves. She's also very flexible - however - has lack of core strength and has to work very hard with it. We often want what we don;t have, yet most gifts also come with other challenges. The other girls tell her how lucky she is - meanwhile she is envious of those with core strength and turned out feet.

 

 

*Knock, Knock** Under 13 parent here....danceintheblood, you are so right. Gifts so often do come with challenges. Our DK's need to make the most of what they have.

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balletbooster

Just for the record, at various points in my daughter's ballet training, she has been told by at least two different teachers at two different schools that she has flat turnout. This was also confirmed by a PT who specializes in ballet, using some kind of specialized equipment measuring hip rotation and the like. She has also been told by at least two different teachers, at two DIFFERENT schools that her turnout was physically limiting and could be a factor in her classical ballet success. :D:excl:

 

So, I just throw our experiences out there and suggest that somewhere in the middle lies the truth! :yes: What has been far more important for my daughter was to get good, solid training that taught her how to use her rotation properly, whatever it actually may be. :)

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  • 2 months later...

DD saw a well known Dr. in NYC. He checked her turnout by having her lie on her stomach

with her legs parallel keeping her hips on the table. He pushed one of legs (bent up) to the side of the other leg.

He said she had very little turnout, not enough for classical ballet. She has been told by teachers she had great turnout , rotation of the hips, high extension, and lots flexiblity. When she lies on the floor in the frog she can go right down to the floor. How accurate is the test the Dr. did? Should we forget about audititioning for top ballet programs this summer because of this result? Thanks.

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Audition for any program you have interest to attend. Auditioning is a valuable experience in itself.

 

Do not place all of your eggs in one basket, but understand that requirements for turnout may vary according to school/company. What really counts is how a dancer moves. If a student never tries then the answers will always be "blowing in the wind". :(:o

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pakrat, the test done on your daughter is accurate as far as the anatomical turn out from the hips goes. 8and only from the hips; there is a small amount of useable - and not detrimental - turn out possible from the knees and ankles, but this must be used carefully, of course)

 

Even with that in mind, what vrs says is so true! It matters very much how a dancer moves!

 

If your daughter is working well, and not pronating, and can _use_ what she has, then there is not reason for despair!

 

-d-

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Thank you for your replies! My only concern is all she wants to do is dance. Is it possible for her to still get into a college for dance. Is comtemporary companies also looking for good turnout or are they alittle more forgiving. I am so confused right now how to support her in the future.

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Victoria Leigh

Pakrat, it is possible for a dancer to learn to USE what rotation she has well enough to look like she has rotation. It does not always happen, but, it can. I have had one who went on to become a principal dancer with a good company, and she did not have good natural rotation at all. But, she was intelligent and a worker. She learned how to use it so well that most people did not even know she did not have much natural ability in that area.

 

Modern Dance companies do not use much rotation, but contemporary ballet is based on ballet technqiue. While it may use more non-rotated movements than the classics, a rotated classical line is still necessary.

 

It sounds to me like there is a conflict of opinion about your daughter's rotation, so, I would definitely not get obsessive about it at this point in time, especially since the teachers seem to be in conflict with the doctor.

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  • 5 weeks later...

DD saw a PT., who was a professional dancer. She tested DD turnout and said she had good turnout. Told her what Dr. said about her turnout . PT. said DD just finished growing alot, she was not warmed up, and she was gripping. PT. noted that she has hyper-hips (?) and needs to do strenghtening exercises to hold her turnout.

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Victoria Leigh

Not sure what she meant about hyper hips, unless it is hyper felxible, meaning very loose, which would indicate extreme extension but not the strength to hold it?

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Victoria Leigh

Meaning that she has difficulty in stabilizing the pelvis? I'm still not sure what that means.

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