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l321385

How "famous" were these dancers/teachers?

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l321385

I was reading the bio for my current director/teacher. It said she trained under Alexandra Danilova, Igor Schwezoff, Anatole Vilzak, Ludmilla Schollar, Yurek Lazovsky and Valentina Pereyaslavec.

Were these people well known in the "times"

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vrsfanatic

All of these dancers/teachers were very well known as either dancers, teachers or both. Perhaps you might like to run a search on Google for more specific information?

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l321385

I did do a google search before posting this. I got some results but not very many for certain ones. I was just wondering because this is from a while ago, it isn't that "big" anymore hence the smaller google pages.

 

P.S thanks for the help :yawn:

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Pasdetrois

Just a Mom of DD's here, I knew the name Alexandra Danilova as a child, I even had pictures of her. Yurek Lazovsky became familiar to me in my early adult life. Both famous and respected dancers/teachers! After their performing careers I believe both taught in the US, in companies and universities!

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Mel Johnson

Just a quicky list of the teachers' claims to fame:

 

Alexandra Danilova - one of the greatest ballerinas of the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, wife of George Balanchine, teacher at the Ballet Russe school and School of American Ballet.

 

Igor Schwezoff - premier danseur in Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, ballet master of the Metropolitan Opera Ballet, teacher at the Ballet Russe school.

 

Anatole Vilzak and Ludmilla Schollar - husband/wife team. Both from the Diaghilev Ballets Russes. He, a sometime partner of Pavlova, she a creator of many roles including much choreography for both Fokine and Nijinsky, who both admired her work. Both teachers at the Ballet Russe school he later at SAB.

 

Yurek Lasowsky - Distinguished character dancer and teacher, interpreter of many roles requiring both difficult technical dancing and acting, as Petrouchka. Much-loved teacher at the Ballet Russe school.

 

Valentina Pereyaslavec - longtime teacher at Ballet Theatre school, she became the "hot teacher" in the 60s when Rudolf Nureyev would take her class.

 

I'd say your teacher studied at Ballet Russe.

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Marga

Just to add to the excellent answers above: Yurek Lazovsky was my character teacher for four years at Adelphi University, from 1965-1969. I absolutely adored him!

 

He was teaching in several locations in New York, including the School of American Ballet and American Ballet Theater school. He brought his own pianist with him, and they both chain-smoked through the class and discussed accompanying pieces and tempi and such in Russian between exercises. His classes were a bit like "character boot camp" and some of the students who couldn't keep the pace disliked them. I, on the other hand, reveled in them and looked forward to Thursdays all week! I'll never forget the Spanish hota he taught us!

 

He has quite an illustrious background and was a very sought after and respected character dancer/coach. I have a video called "First Position" (also known as "A Dancers Life") where he is shown teaching the role of Petrouchka to Michael Smuin. (Valentina Pereyaslavec is also seen teaching on that tape, and her trademark strident voice is a priceless thing to hear! Nureyev is in her class, as well.)

 

Danilova is no doubt the best known name on your list. She was Balanchine's "unofficial" wife and has a very colorful history as well. She was a beloved teacher at SAB, where she remained for the rest of her life. Her biography, "Choura", can easily be found on used book sites on the internet.

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Mel Johnson
(Valentina Pereyaslavec is also seen teaching on that tape, and her trademark strident voice is a priceless thing to hear! Nureyev is in her class, as well.)

 

I think the Soviet Navy used her in WWII as a foghorn on a battleship. "YOU BOAT! GET OUT FROM VAY!"

 

Actually, I do know what she did during the war. She was taken prisoner by the Nazis and sent to Leipzig to work in a war materiel factory. They could have used her for an air raid siren. "BOZHE MOY! GAT IN HOLES! RIGHT AVAY!"

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silvergreydancer

(Valentina Pereyaslavec is also seen teaching on that tape, and her trademark strident voice is a priceless thing to hear! Nureyev is in her class, as well.)

 

I think the Soviet Navy used her in WWII as a foghorn on a battleship. "YOU BOAT! GET OUT FROM VAY!"

 

Actually, I do know what she did during the war. She was taken prisoner by the Nazis and sent to Leipzig to work in a war materiel factory. They could have used her for an air raid siren. "BOZHE MOY! GAT IN HOLES! RIGHT AVAY!"

 

Mel,

 

You are so funny! this is the first time I have visited this area and I'm glad I did. LOL

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Amy Reusch

If you're curious about seeing Danilova:

 

There's a film by the late Anne Belle of Danilova coaching that you might like to see sometime:

 

http://catnyp.nypl.org/search/XAnne+Belle&...SORT=D&7%2C7%2C

 

and of course, she's in The Turning Point which must still be pretty widely available.

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Mel Johnson

I found The Turning Point inadvertently funny, because Danilova was essentially playing herself. She was just like that.

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b1

Just a small point here...

 

I don't believe Danilova and Balanchine ever married. They had a long and personal relationship, but she was never officially one of his wives.

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Mel Johnson

In the words of Danilova herself, "George and I never married; I was his, how you say, 'common (-law) wife'."

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winky

I have very fond memories of taking master classes from Alexandra Danilova. I was a scared little 14 year old looking at this legend. I was so shy! She always gave me sweet smiles trying to put me at ease and would work with me very gently. Once she pointed at me and said with a thick Russian accent "Strong!". That made me feel so good. Even though she was very, very old she still moved beautifully and had great charisma.

Edited by winky

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Mel Johnson

That's her all over! I remember a class I took from her and she gave me a correction while I was in attitude croisé, and she thumped on the side of my chest with her hand, and commented, "Ooo, nice open chest! Boom, boom!"

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winky
That's her all over! I remember a class I took from her and she gave me a correction while I was in attitude croisé, and she thumped on the side of my chest with her hand, and commented, "Ooo, nice open chest! Boom, boom!"

 

 

:D What a great story Mel! You gave me a great chuckle.

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