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Central School Of Ballet


tutumonkey

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Hoping you can help me with this. A friend's daughter has just been offered a scholarship to the 3rd year program at this school. I understand this level tours around the UK? ANy info or opinions about the school would be appreciated. Do they produce professional dancers? (Don't mean to sound stupid or anything!) Tutumonkey :D

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Can't type much at the moment (broken wrist!) but have a look at the Central school website.

 

The UK site ballet.co.uk hosts student dancers' blogs from Central. Not sure how up-to-date they are, but might be a good start.

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Tutumonkey, I have posted several times on different threads about CSB, maybe you want to conduct a search - I believe that it is under pre-professional schools, though it belongs the universities with a ballet program. Students will graduate with a BA (Hons) in Professional Dance and Performance. Students have a very strong classical basis, and a well-versed in contemporary/jazz, and also have to take some classes in musical theatre. Conduct a search and post if you have any more questions, I will try to answer them.

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A friend of mine's son did the three year course at Central and he was actually a bit disappointed with the tour because at the time the works they did were more modern than classical. However, the school has changed directors and I believe there is now a stronger emphasis on ballet. If your daughter only goes for the third year, she cannot graduate with a degree, because the work is spread over the three years. There is also no guarantee of being chosen for the Ballet Central tour, but presumably if your daughter has been offered a scholarship, they would take her for that. Central doesn't have it's own residence - the students have to find their own lodgings - possibly the school recommends places.

 

Elmhurst in Birmingham also has a pre-professional course in the third year of the sixth form and there if you're lucky you get chosen to perform with BRB. Click on to their website to check it out - http://www.elmhurstdance.co.uk/main/WEB%20...rofessional.htm

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I've just had a look on Central's website and it's got a list of companies their graduates have gone into each year. Here's the link: http://www.centralschoolofballet.co.uk/Bal...y%20Members.htm

 

There are two programmes at Central, one is the degree programme with academics and one is purely preparing for the stage. Both programmes create professional dancers but the second one is more suitable for the non-academic student. The degree programme is formatted in that way so that it's suitable for funding making it a lot more accessible for British students.

 

After Royal Ballet School and Elmhurst it's probably considered to be next in line for the standard it produces (feel free to correct me if anyone disagrees, perhaps it's Arts Ed next).

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Thankyou CDR, a very interesting website. :)

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There was a discussion about Central on another thread, so yes do a search. Sorry to disagree with you Dance Scholar London, but this is definitely a pre-professional school. Although Central is based in London it is the school for Northern Ballet Theatre which is based in Leeds. Dancers from Central go there and to companies such as Scottish Ballet (which doesn't have its own school), Adventures in Motion Pictures (Matthew Bourne's "Male" Swan Lake) and many others throughout Europe and the World.

 

They are located not far from Sadler's Wells Theatre, the Dance receiving theatre in London where many visiting companies perform. the school has a policy of inviting visiting ADs to classes or arranging for students to do class with the company which can lead to employment offers.

 

They do not have their own student hostel, but provide a list of suitable ones in Central London. Tutumonkey - you can advise your friend that this is one of London's best ballet schools and her daughter should have no hesitation in accepting.

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Don't forget ENB in your list of top schools - I would say that for classical ballet it's above Central. Although I should add that the current list of teachers is impressive at Central - I suspect that Bruce Samson has made his mark already.

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Hi

 

My son is currently in his final year at Central. If your daughter has been accepted for year 3, then they are expecting to take her on tour, as the Ballet Central auditions take place at the end of year 2. The new Director is Bruce Samson, ex- Principal dancer with the Royal Ballet, and he is proving to be great. The tour programme depends on the strengths of the dancers in that tour group - it will be a mixture of ballet, contemporary and a little jazz and/or musical theatre. Not everyone is in every piece of course - the idea is to showcase the dancer's strengths. This year the choreographer Christopher Bruce is creating a new piece on them - my son says it is fantastic working with him.

 

Whether or not your daughter gets a degree depends on whether her previous studies can be recognised - it is quite possible that this won't be the case. But yes, it is a pre-professional school in the way the course is put together - the academics fit in with the dance and not the other way round. Regarding jobs afterwards, my son has just been offered an apprenticeship contract for next year with Ballet Basel. There is a special relationship with Northern Ballet Theatre (based in Leeds) and usually a few students every year go there.

 

There is no hostel but there are several nearby or share a flat with other girls - you could ask the school to put a notice on the Board asking if anyone needs another girl for next year. We have found the school to be very caring and supportive, but there is no doubt that Year 3 is very tough - be prepared!

 

I don't think I have enough posts to PM, but if you want to talk more I'm sure we can find a way. Very best wishes to your daughter.

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There was a discussion about Central on another thread, so yes do a search. Sorry to disagree with you Dance Scholar London, but this is definitely a pre-professional school. Although Central is based in London it is the school for Northern Ballet Theatre which is based in Leeds.

 

CSB provides a BA (Hons) Degree course which is based (and I am quoting from their handbook now) "a rigorous programme of physical fitness and technical training.... completmented by performance, contextual and professional studies". Doubleturn, I am not sure how you define a preprefessional school, but graduating with a Bachelor degree (validated by the University of Kent in Canterbury) turns the former preprofessional school into a degree program. Students receive 30 credits on a final year disseration, representing 25% of their final degree classification.

 

In a similar way, the degree programs run at LCDS, Rambert, NSCD (all validated by Kent). Maybe you want to explain why you think it is a preprofessional school rather than a degree program?

 

Whether or not your daughter gets a degree depends on whether her previous studies can be recognised - it is quite possible that this won't be the case. But yes, it is a pre-professional school in the way the course is put together - the academics fit in with the dance and not the other way round.

 

I agree with Stitcher that the course - as in other vocational degree course is put together as a preprofessional course, but students will graduate with a degree and not just a diploma. This makes a big difference in terms of funding. And yes, academics fit in with dance, and the allocation of hours depends on the subject. To give you an example of CSB: Ballet + Contemporary is worth 30 credits, consisting of daily ballet classes, including performance repertoire, pointe work, boys class - in terms of actual hours, this represents the majority of the course. However, the disseration receives also 30 credits, although the allocation of hours might be much smaller, but students are expected to work on this individually (reading, researching, writing). This does not mean that the dissertation is not valued, it is just a different form of learning and teaching, but it represents 30 credits out of 120 credits (in year 3).

 

I hope this helps to understand the credit rating/weighing of a vocational degree course in the UK

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The dancers from Central and the other schools mentioned do graduate with a BA Hons. However, all these graduates will be aiming for a professional performing career. Therefore they are pre-pro schools. They start their three year course at 16 and graduate at 19. Entry is by audition only, whether in person or DVD. Academic qualifications are not entry requirements and not everyone is going to be doing the degree. course.

 

No one in UK would ever call any of these schools a University. To go to University you apply when you are 18 and your A-level results are what gets you in or not. Most degrees are 3 years so you graduate at 21. If you study dance at University you would be considered to have missed the boat for a ballet performing career.

 

Hamorah, yes ENB is one of the best too. My DD is going to their Spring Course next week. Will post if any interesting information comes of it.

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IThere are two programmes at Central, one is the degree programme with academics and one is purely preparing for the stage. Both programmes create professional dancers but the second one is more suitable for the non-academic student. The degree programme is formatted in that way so that it's suitable for funding making it a lot more accessible for British students.

 

I am not sure what you mean by the two programs? Are you refering to the foundation degree and the BA (Hons), if so the it is one program as the BA(Hons) is the progression route for the Foundation degree. This so-called "top up" system is in place not only for dance degree (and as part of the conservatoire for dance and drama, the Circus Space has a similar degree structure), but also for a variety of vocational Foundation degrees (usually 2, sometimes 3 years as it is the case at London Studio Centre) and student will apply to enter the third year to "top up" their foundation with a third year leading to a Bachelor of Arts degree.

 

I hope this helps to understand the policies/credit weighing of a vocational degree structure.

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The dancers from Central and the other schools mentioned do graduate with a BA Hons. However, all these graduates will be aiming for a professional performing career.

 

This is very true, however, this concept of vocational degrees does exist for a long time in art schools, where students receive a BA (Hons) in Fine Arts - and want to become professional artists. I am not sure what makes you think that dance and drama would be different.

 

They start their three year course at 16 and graduate at 19. Entry is by audition only, whether in person or DVD. Academic qualifications are not entry requirements and not everyone is going to be doing the degree. course.

 

Audition requirements apply to all schools, and to compare this with an art school, there it might be a portfolio. I think it is in the nature of a vocational degree course to look at the talent in a specific subject, rather than basing it on academic qualifications.

 

 

No one in UK would ever call any of these schools a University. To go to University you apply when you are 18 and your A-level results are what gets you in or not. Most degrees are 3 years so you graduate at 21.

 

As I stated it above, the programs of these schools are validated by a university, which means the academic regulations are the same. This applies to every little details including grading criteria, degree classification, exam board procedures, credit framework, etc.

 

Students have the opportunity to progress to Master of Arts and research degrees after graduation. With a diploma from a preprofessional school, this would not be possible.

 

I agree that it is not a university in itself, but it is validated by a university.

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Thanks for your speedy replies! I'll encourage the dancer's family to look at the school's website and to do a search on this one. Does anyone know what the approximate cost of a flat is in London around the schools area or are there rental websites one could browse to get a better idea? Tutumonkey

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It will probably a shared flat/house, starting at 80GBP/week (single room, but probably not in zone 1). CSB is in zone 1 (central London), where rents start at about 100GBP/week. You might find cheaper places in zone 2, but then you will have to add travel costs. Check out Black Katz, the largest letting agency in London. It is relatively easy to find *any* accomodation in London, but for a good one (reasonably priced, good area and nice flat mates), it will take some time, connection and patience. Please keep in mind that a single room in London might be much smaller than a single room in the US. My room in New Haven (single room) is about 3 times as big as my double room in central London. Rent is expensive, but if you live close to your school, you will have minimal travel costs - I walk almost everywhere and take only the tube to get to the airport. I am sure CSB will be helpful in finding suitable accomodation.

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