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Dancer's Salary?

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2marzipans

My dd is still a student, not a trainee or apprentice. To get insurance for her after she was bumped off our policy while she is training we were able to get insurance through the college she attended part-time (only two courses). It required a lump sum payment. She ended up going only one semester, but she is still covered anyway for one year. This might be an insurance solution for dancers who could work part-time college enrollment into their dance schedule if their local college offers insurance coverage. Thankfully, there are now also part-time jobs that offer health insurance.

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atutulover

Why is she not eligible under your policy if she is still a student and under 19? Has she graduated from high school already? Do you mean she's a student dancer in training, and as such is not eligible?

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2marzipans

Hi, atutulover -

 

She is 19 and a high school graduate. She could no longer be on our policy when she turned 19 and was not a full-time college student. She attends CPYB as a pre-pro student.

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atutulover

Thanks, 2Marzipans. Yikes! One more year before that becomes a serious issue for us, too, should she defer college to continue training. Your suggestions about policies for PT college students are most helpful!

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tsavoie

Have her apply and accept a college, then formally defer. That is the method we used tokeep the insurance, and if he gets hurt then there is another option while getting better.

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atutulover

Can the deferring student still be covered, even if she is not enrolled as a full-time student during that year?

In other words, is college acceptance enough to keep one covered?

 

[edited by moderator to remove full quote of immediately preceding post. atutulover, it is not necessary to quote a preceding post. Instead of hitting the "Reply" button located at the end of the last post, go down a little further--to the end of the thread---and hit the "Add Reply" button. That will open a fresh, clean box in which to type your post. Otherwise, if you do use the "Reply" button at the end of the last post, simply 'delete' the quoted post. That will make the thread read easier for all and will also cut down on unnecessary use of bandwidth. :thumbsup: --dancemaven]

Edited by dancemaven

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kathryn56

I think it depends on your insurance company. Ours demands a minimum number of credit hours to claim an over 18 year old as a student, although they did allow a letter stating that she was a student when she was a trainee.

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2marzipans

Our insurance company would not accept a deferred college acceptance. They also would not accept a letter from CPYB. They told me our dd had to be enrolled as a full-time student "in an accredited school or college" where the student is working toward a degree or certificate. CPYB does not fall into either category. Our dd wants to stay at CPYB, so we'll work it out if we can.

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Hollywood Ballet

I pay my dancers from $20 to $25 an hour. We only rehearse a few hours per week at present, because we're small and new. But we recently got our non-profit sponsorship from Dancers Resource Center of Los Angeles, which means we can get tax-deductible donations through DRC-LA, which keeps 10%. I find this to be a fine arrangement, 'cause then I don't have to deal with all the headaches of becoming and being a 501c-3.

 

As our revenue increases, so will the number of rehearsal hours. I would pay the dancers $50 an hour, if I could, because I know how many years of training they have gone through, and how relatively short the careers are. If only America valued dance as highly as it does football, baseball, or basketball...sigh.

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tsavoie

This insurance stuff has been the stickiest issue about the beginning dancing career. The money is not great, but enough if you don't have to cover the insurance too. I guess that if you are lucky enough to be in Mass. you would have affordable insurance because you would be poor enough to qualify for their subsidized stuff. With the wear and tear on their bodies, these guys really need to keep up the health insurance too.

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vagansmom

We couldn't keep our daughter under our insurance plan either once she turned 19 even though she was attending a pre-pro school full-time. She bought her own private insurance with a high deductible for that period. We figured that if the worst happened, we'd have to pay that deductible.

 

Premaballrina, I agree with most of your statements, especially about considering paying for a child's post high school dancing/room/board vs. paying college tuition/room/board. It IS true that there's little comparison in wages between a dancer's first job and a college grad (non-dancer's) first job even though the college grad non-dancer may be making just an entry level salary. Most dancers' first jobs don't make even that. :speechless:

 

And it's also true, as e's mom and someone else (I'm sorry - I can't find the post) says, that while we say that we're paying for our dancing children's post-high school experience instead of college, the reality is that very few dancers continue in dance after 2 or 3 years post high school, but turn instead to college. And that needs to be funded. Most of the dancers who are lucky enough to get a "job" (I just can't think of it that way when there isn't a living wage) as a trainee are let go after 2 years. That's when they turn to college.

 

So then the parent(s) may also have to consider college fees in addition to having paid for those two or three years of post high school training/living expenses. That's more years of paying for our children than we may have bargained for.

 

Vicarious, I am certain that we have a lot in common in terms of not having the money to support our kids' college tuition OR their post high school dance training. In some ways, we are better off than people whose incomes are just a tad above ours :) because more financial aid possibilities are available to us.

 

My non-dancing son attended a great college on a combination of scholarships, grants, and loans. His financial aid package for nearly all the schools he applied to came back quite do-able for him. He's paying back his loans now.

 

My daughter also received great financial aid packages from the colleges she applied to, and one of them was nearly a free four year ride if she maintained a certain GPA. She deferred, and then never went to college, but that's another story. :sweating:

 

Ultimately, she will attend college full-time, and I do have faith that some school will offer her enough money to make it possible. She plans on reapplying to the schools that offered her such good packages in the first place. For us, paying for her post-high school expenses while she continued training was harder than the ways we helped out our son, even though she had a scholarship and worked part-time in the mornings. That was enough for her to pay for her groceries and some other living expenses, but not her entire living expenses.

 

We made a deal with each of our kids that we could put some money into their college/dancing expenses, but they would have to pay it back. Both are doing so. Once our daughter got a real living wage as a dancer, she started to pay us back for the money we loaned her. It's the only way we could've done it. And I think it's made my kids more resourceful and responsible than many of their peers. There is a plus side to not having much money. :P

 

What I'm saying by my kids' examples is that there is a college for everybody whether they start right away after high school or wait some years. Some school somewhere, Vicarious, will like your daughter enough that they will offer her a financial aid package that will be do-able for her. It doesn't need to be a community college although that too is a great inexpensive choice (that also offers financial aid) for the first two years of college. She'll figure it out for herself.

 

I want to add tutoring to the list of job possibilities for our kids post-high school. The hours can be flexible, the tutoring can be done at the client's home or in a public library, and the salary is decent. My daughter did a little bit of tutoring and found that two sessions equaled her 20 hours weekly part-time salary working for a passport company.

 

It turns out that many people like having smart post-high school kids tutoring their kids as homework helpers (not remedial tutoring). They like their youthful energy. If your dancing kiddo has decent SAT scores too, that's a big plus in obtaining that kind of job.

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Hollywood Ballet

Though I don't ever want to grow beyond 8 or 10 dancers, I would love to be able to offer health coverage to my dancers. In fact, I'd say this is an important goal, and when the time comes that it is really feasible, I will be making a lot of inquiries about the various plans available. I'm an IC where I teach and don't even have health coverage myself, though I need it, what with 8 or more classes per week. I suppose I'll be the last one to get it, just as I'll be the last one to ever get paid in the dance company. Not complaining, really, I figure it goes with the business.

Edited by Hollywood Ballet

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isamaa
My son is in a second company. He earned enough to cover his rent,metro and cable. We subsidizd foodand paid for his phone. Compared to the costs of his college going brother, it seemed like a good deal. I suppose it depends on the company whether it works out. Because it is second company, he gets paid as a contractor, so our insurance covers him as though he were still a student which is also helpful.

 

Which second company does he dance for?

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Clara 76

isamaa,

Some of our parents don't wish to identify exactly where their children are. It's ok to ask, but don't be hurt if the parents wish to keep that information private. :unsure:

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vicarious
My son is in a second company.......... Because it is second company, he gets paid as a contractor

 

What implications does being paid as a contractor have? Will he have unemployment insurance, workman's comp., or social security? Or does he have to do this on his own like any other type of private contractor?

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