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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Double pirouettes


Guest Juliecute

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Julie, a single pirouette takes almost no momentum at all, so to do a double you need just a bit more push from the plié and a little more impetus around the corner. Add the double spot, and, if you have the balance and placement, and are not afraid to stay up on your relevé until you complete the two revolutions, there you are! smile.gif Sounds simple, doesn't it? wink.gif But really, it is not difficult once you understand the principal of turning, know how to spot, and have a good center and balance point on your relevé retiré position.

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Guest Juliecute

Thanks for the reply! I was also wondering about head spots, even when i do head spots i get dizzy. Is head spots sopposed to completly eliminate dizziness?

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Julie, if you are using your head correctly, there is no reason to ever get dizzy when doing pirouettes. Are you talking about just a regular en dehors or en dedans pirouette, or pirouettes en diagonal, like piqué turns or chaînés? In any case, a good clean spot on each turn will prevent the dizziness smile.gif

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Guest Juliecute

I'm talking about regular en dehors pirouettes. I guess i'm not spotting correctly. Pirouettes are definetely not my strong pointe! smile.gif

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Guest linsusanr

Juliecute, I'm with you there! Turning is definitely my weaker point. I find that my singles are fine and clean, but I always seem to lose my spot immediately after the first. Consequently, my attempts at doubles are not very pretty. Is there a good exercise to improve spotting besides the usual walk around oneself and turn the head at the last moment? Quick spots have always been tough for me. I appreciate any advice! Thanks! smile.gif

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The problem with spotting is that it is usually taught the way you just described frown.gif Walking and leaving the head 'till the last minute just don't quite do it. One is not moving fast enough, and the head waits too long. You need to do paddle turns, which generate more speed and the head has to move sooner. Another good thing is chassé turns en diagonal (not jumping) and piqué soutenu (or tour de Basque/pas de Basque turns) en diagonal. Also chaînés, although those are more difficult.

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Guest Nadezhda

quote:

Originally posted by Victoria Leigh:

Add the double spot, and, if you have the balance and placement, and are not afraid to stay up on your relevé until you complete the two revolutions, there you are!

That exactly is my problem. I am afraid to stay two revolutions and start lowering my releve to flat and never complete them. I have enought momentum and placement. Sometimes balance is a problem, but not always. confused.gif What am I to do with this?

 

Also, I'd like to add this second thing: Sometimes I can almost do a triple pirouette (a decet two and a half with very clear landing and everything...) on other days it seems like I cannot accomplish even a single. I guess it depends on the day? Why does this happen? I know it takes practice and I do practice, but still sometimes I feel like the most clumsy thing being unable to finish a single pirouette!

 

Thank you for your reply in advance.

 

God, is good to be back. smile.gifbiggrin.gif

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Welcome back, Nadezhda, we have missed you!

 

The key to finishing the pirouettes is to be very busy still going upwards at the end, even at the moment the working foot is on the way down to the floor. You are thinking the pirouette is over before it's over, and starting downward. Don't go down at all, lift yourself even further upward in order to PLACE your foot on the floor, as opposed to falling back onto that foot. Simple? No, but, again, if the placement, strength and balance point are there, it's not that hard. You just need to enjoy it up there while you are turning and NOT WANT to ever come down! wink.gif

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Guest Christina_ballerina

I used to have lots of problems with pirouettes. frown.gif The number one thing was letting my arm position drop. My arms were sooo sloppy, but I never really thought about that being a reason I couldn't do more than a single pirouette. confused.gif When I started studying Cecchetti alot of emphasis was put on arms and I noticed that once I started to hold my arms up in front of my body opposed to letting them 'fly' where ever that my pirouettes really improved. So I focused on holding my arms in front while I was turning. Then came the plie, I reallly needed a 'spongy' plie. So I focused on practicing my plies in fourth and holding my turnout. If your preparation for pirouette is fifth then practice getting really good plies from fifth. Alot of the time when I'm working on just about any skill in ballet I find that just remembering basic things like plies, turnout, spotting, and holding your center are the most helpful. wink.gif You really just have to practice pirouettes alot to perfect them. There is no telling how many hundreds of singles that I did before I even came close to getting a double. And once I got a double, the triple came in a snap. Just keep working on it, it will come soon. biggrin.gif

 

Christina, the ballerina

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Ms. Leigh - I was just wondering....what is a "paddle turn"? Since you mentioned they will help improve spotting, I'd love to try them, but I'm not sure if they are something I know. I'd love to be enlightened! Thanks.

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"Paddle turns" are just a colloquial name for those plain old coupé character turns that you do flat, and just propel yourself around with the back foot. Everybody does them, and you can whip up some pretty good speed doing them, too!

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