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Agnes1022

"B-Plus" position

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sunpacy
My teacher used "B-Plus" term to describe what I can best describe as an unstretched tendu en arriere. Is there a technical term for "B-Plus", what is the origin of the words "B" "Plus", and what is the correct leg/foot position for it?

 

 

It means Balanchine + with the cou de pie back and B- or Balanchine - which is with the cou de pie in the front.

It is just an american invention.

In the US is the only country that I know that translate steps names and directions from original french.

Tendu side on the floor.

Tendu a la second a terre

Edited by sunpacy

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Mel Johnson

The term seems to have originated in places surrounding NYCB, like SAB. Why, I don't know, but it appears a lot in Balanchine, but is not exclusive to his work. And every place I've been in the world has quite a few local nicknames and shorthand for various steps and poses.

 

Still waiting for an answer relating to Labanotation, mentioned above.

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appleblossom

It sounds the same as RAD 'classical pose' - does anyone know if it is?

 

That is what I was thinking too

 

Me too. Is there a picture of B+ anywhere?

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Victoria Leigh

Find a photo of any corps de ballet standing in a pose, and 99% of the time it will be B+ :shrug:

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Amy Reusch
It means Balanchine + with the cou de pie back and B- or Balanchine - which is with the cou de pie in the front.

 

Ha! :shrug: So what is that position called where the foot crosses in front past the standing foot (it's sometimes used in parallel as a stretch, or as a neoclassical pose).... B~ ?

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Mel Johnson

Actually, the "B" is two triangles joined at a vertex with the + sign, which signifies this pose in Labanotation. (I finally looked it up!) And the opposite of this attitude derriere par terre is, of course, attitude devant par terre.

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Dansant
Actually, the "B" is two triangles joined at a vertex with the + sign, which signifies this pose in Labanotation.

 

Not sure where the + would come in Labanotation. The + in Labanotation is the hip joint. In Labanotation B+ would typically be written as a sort of trapezoid with an x below it and a hook attached to the side of it. Two triangles joined would be a cou-de-pied (or retire) which clearly not what is desired.

 

In Benesh there is a plus involved to signify the back knee bent. Could it have come from that?

 

I was always told the + in B+ referred to the shape of the legs crossing.

 

(MFA in Labanotation, basic Benesh skills)

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Mel Johnson

Where were you when I needed you, up on post #4? :D I had to try to dope out the Laban for it, and obviously got it wrong. I think that the name is some kind of pawky humor, perhaps involving notation, and perhaps not. Anne Hutchinson taught at SAB for a short time in the early '60s (Ford Foundation period), but the name B+ doesn't emerge until long, long after she had left. It's definitely not Benesh.

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kellyisthebestintheworld
Hans

That last one is a nice example of attitude à terre derrière effacé. The dancers appear to have only just got into position, and one or two don't quite have their knees connected yet, but once they fully arrive in position the knees will of course be held together. It also shows how only the inside corner of the big toe should be placed on the floor.

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