Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers

Styles of Ballet


Guest Enterprisecdr

Recommended Posts

Guest Enterprisecdr

We got finished performing a "Bournonville" style Nutcracker. My questions are: What are the differences between a classical and a bournonville style of ballet? Are there any other styles of ballet? Our choreographer was Mr. Kennet Oberly (very nice guy, very caring about us dancers... biggrin.gifcool.gif )just in case anyone wanted to know....

 

Thanks! tongue.gif

 

-Kat

 

[ January 15, 2002: Message edited by: Enterprisecdr ]

Link to comment

Bournonville is a style named after a Danish choreographer, Auguste Bournonville whose output was primarily during the High Romantic period (think before the American Civil War) in Denmark. Bournonville is characterized by distinctive arms, which have the elbows slightly dropped, a number of types of turns which aren't seen anywhere else today, lower arabesques and extensions in general, and much lightness and quickness in batterie both petit and grand.

Link to comment

Bournonville have a site with photographs of dancers in all the main positions.

 

www.bournonville.com

 

Go to "Style" then "Positions and stylistic characterisatics". There are so many pictures that it takes a while to get them all, but it really gives you a taste of the style. It's very pretty, i'd like to learn it! smile.gif

 

[ January 16, 2002: Message edited by: Lolly ]

Link to comment
  • Administrators

I just deleted a long, but interesting, post because this board is limited to Young Dancers and the moderators, as stated above. Sorry Katharine, but the rules are the rules and we have to do that. If you would like to post that information somewhere else that would be fine.

Link to comment

Kat, if I read a review that said a company had a "Bournonville style Nutcracker," I'd expect the first act to be very detailed. By that, I mean lots of characters of different ages, each with specific bits of business to do. That was very important to Bournonville's way of making ballets. I believe Mr. Oberly has a specific interest in Bournonville's ballets and has studied them, both the technique and the way they are made.

Link to comment
Guest Leigh Witchel

Sorry Kat - I wrote a reply last night and my computer crashed in the middle of it (stupid computer!) I wanted to reply because Kennet was also my teacher.

 

Everyone is quite right in telling you the various areas where Bournonville style might diverge from another style. The carriage of the arms is held lower and softly curved. Transition steps like pas de bourree are often used in a less syncopated manner. And importantly as Alexandra mentioned, there's an emphasis on integrating acting and mime into the dancing.

 

I hope this will inspire to find some tapes of the Royal Danish Ballet and look at them to compare how they dance to other companies and see what you think!

Link to comment
Guest Enterprisecdr

Sorry about your computer Ms. Witchel! They have a nasty habit of doing that right in the middle of something important (term papers for instance YUCK!) That's cool that you've worked with Kennet as well! biggrin.gif

 

Anyways...

 

What other style of ballet are there? What characterizes them? Thanks!

 

-Kat

Link to comment
Guest Leigh Witchel

Kat -

 

There are several styles of ballet, and in America, almost none of them are "purebred" - most of us are "mutts" - for instance I had teachers who were strongly influenced by Vaganova and some also influenced by R.A.D. training. And all of them had ideas of their own.

 

Here are a few definable styles and schools. I'm sure Major Mel and Ms. Leigh can think of more and explain these further.

 

Soviet/Vaganova - the training of the current century from the Soviet Union. Kirov ballet dancers are Vaganova trained. Another Russian company with a very definable, heroic style is the Bolshoi. There is also Russian schooling that is "Pre-Soviet" - the dispersal of Russians following the revolution brought that training to many places including America with teachers like Pierre Vladimirov and Anatole Oboukhoff, both of whom taught at the School of American Ballet in its early years.

 

America has spawned styles of ballet all its own. The most recognizable is that of the New York City Ballet and George Balanchine. I think also the Joffrey Ballet promulgated a distinct style and training.

 

Other recognizable schools and styles include that of the Royal Ballet of England and the Paris Opera Ballet in France. If you read more on the site, you'll see many discussions on all of these companies which can further answer your questions.

 

One of the best ways to find out more about these styles is to watch tapes of these companies. Enjoy!

 

(and just so you're not confused by my name, which is common, I'm a man.)

Link to comment
Guest Enterprisecdr

Thanks, and I apologise Mr. Witchel! On the internet, you can never know who's who for sure! eek.gif (wonder if that's a good thing or not...hmmm....)

 

-Kat

Link to comment
  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    • No registered users viewing this page.
×
×
  • Create New...