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Ballet Talk for Dancers
KarenD

Your point of view?

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3dancefam
I'd also like to know if "the powers that be" will place the kids that don't go to SI's because they were not accepted and who don't foresee a career in dance, higher than the kids with scholarships to the bigger programs who aspire to be professional dancers?

 

If the good ones go away and the AD is standing fast to this rule then who else does the AD have to promote?

Sounds to me like your AD is only thinking of her/him self, NOT what is in the best interest of the dancer. Other than not having partnering, would the training be that different? I know that sounds like a stupid question but obviously other dancers are in the same boat as your DD. If they're all in the same class then they would be able to continue to challenge each other and work on their technique. Also their instructors would know their abilities and hopefully teach to them. I would seriously be looking for other options though. I wouldn't want my money going to someone who had so little regard for my child's best interests. :D

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Aisadora

I wanted to answer questions brought up by this puzzeling issue. Yes, dancers who do not go away get promoted if they are in the home SI. Occationaly a dancer is not ready for the next level and is not promoted , also occasionaly a dancer will be promoted mid year. By not being in the top level of training in our home program, my DD will not have some preformance ops as well as higher level variations classes, student choreography and partnering. She will be able to continue to take 5 ballet classes each week in the next level down and 4 point classes in the highest level. Tap/ jazz and modern classes are not affected. I have to say all of this really is hard on a teenagers enthusiasm for dancing everyday. I really wish we had other options at home during the year.

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Sucre

All of the upper level kids should attend the SI that they want, whether it interferes or not. Maybe the AD will get a clue that paying customers cannot get pushed around.

 

POWER TO THE PARENTS!

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3dancefam

Right On!!!

Any AD in their right mind could not possibly give dancers that are not technically good enough, performance ops and push aside the ones that are. Imagine how the performances will suffer. What about her supporter base. They are not going to want to pay good money to see poor quality. Is your AD crazy or does he/she just have a self destruct desire?

If this AD really wants to keep the dancers at the home studio by punishing them for going away, it seems to me that what is actually going to happen will be that he/she is PUSHING them away. They will not be happy, won't have the opportunities so many other dancers have and will begin to look for the best way out.

Edited by 3dancefam

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Aisadora

I agree, and yet it does happen. When the supporter base has children who also dance that makes things sticky. Also many of the parts are filled by company members. It is so political. My DD is an artist not a politician.

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KarenD

you would think the "the power of the paying customer" would apply.......but from what I have quietly observed it doesn't always seem to in the world of ballet.

 

Aisadora, is the company and its school the only (or best) game in town? Do you have other options?

 

If it is, then that makes it much harder. (I can identify with that circumstance.) In that case, if I were in your shoes, I would weigh what would be gained from attending the away from home SI, against what would be lost the rest of the year.

 

On the other hand, if there were other options nearby of comparable quality, I might be investigating those, not necessarily to make a change, but to supplement classes if your AD really does follow through.

 

Either way, as I replied in my earlier post, I would be finding the right time to talk with the AD.....

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Aisadora

Again , I agree . We have decided that she will absolutely go away for the summer. She has gone away for the past 4 years. The summer intensives offer such a rewarding experience over all. The home program does have a good rep, and other options in the area are limited. Not to mention that when you have been at a studio for many many years it becomes extened family, for better or worse. I am actualy starting to wonder about year around programs...and yet not wanting her to go away soooo soon.

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KarenD

I understand completely about the "extended" family! Its the emotional ties and loyalty that makes changing "homes" so hard to consider.

We went through that a few years ago when the school she was at (smaller than where she is now) lost their key ballet instructor. They never were able to find a quality replacement, and so, we ended up changing schools. But it was very hard. We made the break over the summer; she attended the summer program of the school she attends now.

I wish you luck.... I hope your AD will be able to listen to you with an open mind. Maybe you can take the tact with them that her "away" experiences will enhance her learning and performing with the current schools. Instead of "taking away" from the school, she may be bringing something valueable back.

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Sucre

Aisadora, it is sad that you are being treated this way after having a long history there. KarenD is right, you should have a chat with the AD.

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isamaa

"My DD is an artist not a politician."

 

Aisadora, unfortunately most things in life are political to a degree, but the world of Ballet seems to sway in that direction more so than most in many cases.

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Aisadora

Thank you , you are right, most things are some what political. Thank you isamaa, your advise has always been golden for us! On the positive side my DD is very excited about the SI options she has this year!

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isamaa

Your daughter's happiness is the important thing. Just the fact that she's being given terrific options is wonderful. Being a parent of 1 or more talented children is not an easy job. Every decision that is made is one that can have a crucial impact on their careers and lives. Especially when they get into their mid to upper teen years. The networking and contacts that are made in the summer programs, not to mention the exposure to instructors and directors that can benefit them in the coming years, is not something that can be discarded easily. If your daughter truly desires to have ballet as her profession then the desisions that are made now need to be weighed very heavily as to their impact on her ability to get a job and pursue her dream. My recommendation would be to get her out of there as soon as possible and into a year round program with a major company where you know there is great training as well as opportunity.

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Aisadora

Well, I am certainly weighing our summer choices heavily for this year. I have been trying to do as much research as possible about what programs are the best choice for her, and now I am absolutely pursuing only the ones that have year around programs as well. It is so hard to determine what programs offer her the best ops. As every dancer has different gifts and every program is different as well, in terms of the dancers they prefer . How do you determine what program is best for them, in terms of future options?

Sorry if I'm obsessing, it just seems so daunting!

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2marzipans

I think all programs will give your dancer future options if they provide a high level of training. It's a matter of finding the best fit for your child. Researching their websites, reading BT4D :), SI experiences, and taking classes and tours when the year-round schools are in session are all good ways to narrow them down. Your dancer has only so many summers to test the waters. Have your dancer choose a program that fits her needs this summer and is also a realistic prospect for future year-round training. This doesn't always mean a big name program, even though our kids love to attend them.

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isamaa

Check into the company. Read through the bios, research the rep, check to see what their track record for accepting students from their training program into their company is (Obviously no matter where you train can it be assumed that you will automatically be asked into the company), how well regarded is the program you are looking into, and last how interested are they in your daughter. These are all things to consider. Research, research, research.

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