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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Italian Fouettes versus 'regular' ones


Tutulicous

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Just wondering... What is the difference between an italian foutte and a normal one?

 

Hope I'm allowed to post here, if not please move my post as you see fit.

 

[I split your topic and moved it here, Tutulicious. The Teachers Forum is just for discussions among the teacher members. :wink: --dancemaven]

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There are all kinds of fouettés, Tutulicous! The word itself means "whip". In some fouettés there is a front to back whip, like in the grand fouetté sauté (en dedan). That movement can also happen with a piqué or a relevé instead of a sauté. It can also be done en dehor, where you battement the leg back and whip around to a front position. :wink:

 

Fouetté turns are the consecutive whipping turns that you see most often in the coda section of a grand pas de deux.

 

Italian fouettés are the ones they are talking about in the Teachers Forum right now. They start with a tombé relevé développé to écarté devant, bring that leg down through a first position as you turn to the back corner and battement front whipping into an attitude derrière. There are also usually done consecutively, but only about 7 or 8 at a time. They are a relatively difficult step on pointe, and I do not teach it until the advanced level.

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Thank-you for your detailed explanation Miss Leigh, I know exactly what they are now. I've seen them before in Sleeping Beauty - if I remember correctly.

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  • 2 weeks later...

Normal fuoettes are when your leg goes to cuaze then to second then to posse as you turn. Italian fuoettes are when you kick your leg on an angle and then you fuoette around to a posse sort of. i cant explain it that well.

 

 

Sorry about the misspells, i hate writing ballet words! :shrug:

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Lexii, the question had been answered and explained in my post above. Please read before posting.

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You should learn. An artist needs to know how to communicate in the "language" of his/her chosen art. That still doesn't explain misspellings for "because" and "can't".

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Nor does it explain your spelling of "fouetté", when the word is spelled correctly in the title of this topic!

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