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Shara77

Summer Intensive against teacher approval

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Momof3darlings
Why do we all appear to have a fear of our DD's ballet teachers? We've asked this question locally many times and it appears to be a universal problem. Don't get the teacher mad or we'll pay for it later!"

 

The better question is actually why would you subject your child to a teacher you were afraid of? There are great ballet teachers all around. There are professional and pre-professional ones all around. If you chose the so called"best" school but it's filled with teachers you're afraid of, then what are you subjecting your child to? And more importantly, why? Ballet may be a passion but it sure doesn't pay much and is certainly not worth a child's well being.

 

Here's to everyone finding teachers they truly trust with their child's dance education. It is a freeing way to live through this journey and I'm glad I did that for myself and for my dancer.

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Pasdetrois

Momof3, I agree with you completely regarding not putting up with nasty teachers who create fear. Sadly, I know that even in a Dolly Dinkle school this 'fear' is experienced. It doesn't have to be a pre pro environment. At times I think we do it to ourselves. This audition season my DD is not auditioning to the requirements of her main teachers and I know there is a little trepidation waiting for the fall out. Maybe it's human nature to put ourselves in a hierarchy with the teachers at the top because we, as parents are not experts. We truly trust our teachers but at times I see that they are very good at having tunnel vision even after being told money isn't available or the desire is to stay home. It's hard to be assertive when you've seen the fall out when others haven't done what they were told. Even the best of teachers can be strong minded and even bits of bullies when they want you heading in a certain direction. I really don't think the intent is to be nasty but I have to admit, for me, the 'fear factor' is alive and kicking! That said, I do trust these teachers, they are brilliant, they are nurturing, yet, opinionated and they can be intimidating!

 

Back to the subject of this thread. The more I think about it, the more I know, I would not send a 12 year old to an SI, no matter how mature or talented. Children need to have childhoods. There are many years that are ahead of such a young person and many an SI giving out acceptances in each of those years. By the way, my DD's both got the same SI, at the same age of 12, that this thread is the subject of. Neither of my DD's went and we have no regrets!

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wannabe

"Ballet may be a passion but it sure doesn't pay much and is certainly not worth a child's well being."

 

Sorry- don't know how to add quotes!!

 

What do you do when you live in a very rural area with extremely limited choices for great training and your DD hounded you constantly from the age of 2 (when she could barely talk and she knew no-one else taking dance lessons) to sign her up for dance lessons? She then by chance is invited to take lessons at what we view as the best studio around (definitely the best within our commuting distance). What do you do then? :D

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Clara 76
What do you do then? :D

 

You remember that the lessons that her passion and working towards it will bring to her as a person, will be invaluable lessons.

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Momof3darlings

Are we still talking SIs, wannabe? Or have we moved to a more general question?

 

Certainly, living in a rural area with not much ballet makes it very difficult. Having grown up in a VERY rural area, I know that city miles and rural miles are not equal in terms of finding dance or even good shopping. :( You are stuck with the rules of the studio that your child takes from or you are the rebel mom who breaks/bends the rules. However, there is a big difference in having a child take from a teacher who you don't agree with every detail of how they do things and what I was commenting on here, the idea of "fear". As an adult if we "fear" a teacher, what in the world do we think our child feels on a daily basis?

 

If a school doesn't agree with your decision to send your child away, you do the best you can for your child whatever you deem that to be. If you buck the system, the child comes back and the teachers are a little standoffish for a while, you keep trudging along knowing they will get over it. If they are the type of people who don't "get over it", then you make choices for the betterment of your child. Always, first and foremost! However, think long and hard if the teacher's decision to not recommend a child going away could possibly be in the child's best interest!!!!! That is the 50 Million dollar question and not all parents know enough about dance to truly answer that question.

 

However, I do believe in this thread we were talking about how this relates to 12 and 13 year olds and SIs. If a school doesn't believe in any SIs at all, ever, that is one thing. However, if a school doesn't believe in SIs for younger students yet they are okay for older students, there really is some validity to that and maybe we need to at least listen. It doesn't have to change what you do, but there are far too many parents of older dancers here who have come on to say that while they might have done it themselves, there are valid reasons not to hit the SI trail at 12. These are first hand up to and including as a parent, having made the wrong SI choice for a child at that particular time in their dance growth. For example: last summer there was a parent who vehemently opposed her home teachers, other parents on this board and a few moderators about her child going to a particular SI. She went, and came home realizing that she should have heeded the warnings. Not because the SI itself is a bad one, but because it might not have been the SI for her child at that moment in time. There is a fine balance between rational fear, normal questioning and the mommy blinders we all put on from time to time. It's a slippery slope that we all teeter on with our kids.

 

Pas--I completely understand.

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wannabe

mom0f3- I was still talking SIs- and specifically in regards to SIs against teacher approval. Luckily so far DD DOES have teacher approval- but it seems that there is a big push for dancers to stay at the home SI. I guess that just because DDs choices for a good home studio are limited (unless we want to move), I was hoping for imput from others that may have faced the choice of attending "big name" SIs on scholarship while risking retaliation from a home studio that knows they may be the only choice around.

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loreal
Hi everyone! This is my first posting so I hope I'm putting it in the right place. My 12 year old auditioned and was accepted into Boston Ballet's (Newton) Summer Intensive. When I told her dance teacher she flipped out and yelled at me that "no way, no way, do NOT send her to a summer intensive". She went on stating that my daughter will loose technique and take 3 months upon return to get back what she will loose. Her teacher was very angry! She believes in only sending very advanced, older dancers to intensives (my oldest daughter, 17, will be attending Joffrey NY). My youngest, again, 12, is low to mid intermediate level. Should I send her to Boston despite the teacher's worry or listen to the teacher? I'm really stuck on this, not to mention very annoyed at how the teacher spoke to me (we've been at this studio 7 years). Thanks for the advise. - Shara

 

 

Boston summer intensive is very good for a 12 yr old. By age 17, they are really to old for summer intensives, you can be recruited into a pro company by then. My friends and I attended when we were 13, and every years since age 12 attended a new summer intensive. My friend was even recruited into a pro company at age 16. I hope your daughter attends. She will have a great experience!

L'Oreal

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Victoria Leigh

Hello loreal, welcome to Ballet Talk for Dancers.

 

I'm curious as to why you say that 17 is too old for SI's? Most students are still in high school and have another year to do, and SI's even after graduation are attended by many, many students. In fact, VERY few have jobs at 16 or 17, nor are they ready for jobs at that age.

 

By the way, your other post, with a link to your website, was removed. We do not allow any advertising of schools on this site.

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kiwiwdancer

DD, 13 years old, just decided on Orlando 5 week. Some teachers were VERY discouraging. Warning of burn-out, injury,homesickness. DD wanted to try auditions and at the auditions she attended she fell in love with the idea of going away. We told her right off that we didn't have the money, yet she persisted and is offering her own money. She is serious and it is all coming from her. When I asked why she wanted to go she replied "to get better". Well that was it. If she had said to get a better part in Nutcracker or the like then I would have emphatically said "no". But she truly wants, in her heart, to progress and reach her potential. One teacher said kids get terribly homesick gone that long. DD said no I won't. Which I know she might but she didn't bat an eye with her response.- her confidence reassures me that this is what she wants. She was told she would get injured from dancing 6 hours a day. Well, I spoke with many who have gone to SI's and the consensus is if they get injured a lot at the home studio then they will probably confront that same thing away. But, if not then their probably won't be an injury issue. On top of it, my DD has participated in kid's triathlons and 5K runs since she was 8, she is extremely strong. Another teacher reminded me of that and reassured that DD is less likely than most to get injured. And as for the burn-out aspect, the way I see it if DD gets burnt out then we have learned right now that this isn't for her as a career (which is what she aspires to and has since 5 years old) and DD can pursue other activities when she enters high school in 2 years.

 

Because DD is so adamant and sure that this is something she wants to try, we are sending her. She even says "Its just one month and one week-thats not long". DD is ready to experience other teachers and be surrounded by children of the same passion and mind-set. She is up for the challenge. The teachers who were discouraging had never been to an SI themselves and every student, parent and instructor I spoke to who had SI experience did not have anything negative to say. Sometimes I heard that the food didn't taste so good, but that was the only negative.They say how they made friends and were not homesick that the amount of dancing was not overwhelming and they had progressed more than they had all during the school year. This will be DD's first SI and I am already learning that some people are dead-set against it and others who have been there done that are thoroughly encouraging.It all depends on DD's motivation and desire, I think.We'll see after she comes back.

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loreal
Hello loreal, welcome to Ballet Talk for Dancers.

 

I'm curious as to why you say that 17 is too old for SI's? Most students are still in high school and have another year to do, and SI's even after graduation are attended by many, many students. In fact, VERY few have jobs at 16 or 17, nor are they ready for jobs at that age.

 

By the way, your other post, with a link to your website, was removed. We do not allow any advertising of schools on this site.

 

 

That was because she said that her daughters teacher wouldn't allow her students to take intensives until they were 17, which make absolutely no sense because most students that would be accepted at that age are at a professional level and the teachers will actually be looking to the students of that age to recruit them for there own company's. Age 17-21 is the most common age of recruitment. I worked as a professional dancer for a lot of years and this is from first hand experience. Also, most of my friends were in professional companys all recruited at 17. We started SI at 12. Then after I read that her teacher has er own summer intensive its clear to me that she is just in it for the money, and not the best interest of the children. Unfortunetly, that happens a lot.

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Victoria Leigh

While it is possible for 17 year olds to be in companies, today it is far more likely that they are a bit older than that. If they finish high school at 17 and are quite exceptional it is possible for them to become a trainee or even an apprentice, but not at all likely for them to be a full company member. Things were a bit different a number of years ago.

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loreal

Yes, thats exactly what I mean. I never stated that they would be recruited and made a soloist, but they are looking for young girls with exeptional talent, and they would start out as apprentices. I am only 31, and it hasnt been that long ago and most of my peers are still in company's, and I have many connections with artistic directors such as Willian starret of columbia city ballet, ans Miguel Campaneria of Balleteatro Nacional de Puerto Rico who was just appointed to serve on the National Council on the Arts, the advisory body of the National Endowment for the Arts.

Just stating my professional advice and knowledge.

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Victoria Leigh

Loreal, please find the Fast Reply or Add Reply buttons, which are below the "Reply. In this format it is not necessary to quote the previous post, or even posts further up the page unless you are going back a long way and the thread has shifted.

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Bebe

I happen to agree with dancingawaymylife...it is true that some studios only care about the $$ and if too many students leave during the summertime it becomes a financial hardship for the studio...so they will discourage many from attending...that being said...it also goes the other way too...sometimes a studio only wants those who they deem ready or their cream of the crop to represent the school and audition for the SI's...you make the call...

 

Our studio encourages our DK's to both audition and attend SI's. They feel it gives each student a greater perspective outside their own studios and is a chance for them to grow. Our instructors start encouraging at the ages of 11 yrs & up...however, they only encourage those students/parents who ask them about the SI's, as they don't want other students/parents to feel bad that they're not going to attend one, or can't afford to go, or feel that they have to attend an SI. It's purely a matter of choice and our studio leaves it up to the individual.

 

The instructors feel it to be practical because:

1. They see other students at or beyond their own level.

2. They learn other techniques and styles of ballet/dance

3. It broadens them in ways they can't sometimes get at their own home studios. (sometimes DK's get to comfy inside their own studios - SI's can break them out of their cocoon)

 

I haven't heard of any student ever falling behind as a result in attending an SI, so I can't make a comment on what your DD's instructor has said. I do know that a dancer from our studio attended Bosten SI and she loved it. She learned so much there and couldn't of been happier. If your DD has taken the time to audition than I'm assuming she really wants to attend, right? Then why not go for it??? Although, I'm not telling you to go against her instructor - merely saying DD should be able to make the call (not the teacher dictating), and if that means going to the SI then so be it!

 

I just think in the end you both have to do what's right for yourselves and what's going to make your DD happiest! :yes:

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trythis

"Hi everyone! This is my first posting so I hope I'm putting it in the right place. My 12 year old auditioned and was accepted into Boston Ballet's (Newton) Summer Intensive. When I told her dance teacher she flipped out and yelled at me that "no way, no way, do NOT send her to a summer intensive". She went on stating that my daughter will loose technique and take 3 months upon return to get back what she will loose. Her teacher was very angry! She believes in only sending very advanced, older dancers to intensives (my oldest daughter, 17, will be attending Joffrey NY). My youngest, again, 12, is low to mid intermediate level. Should I send her to Boston despite the teacher's worry or listen to the teacher? I'm really stuck on this, not to mention very annoyed at how the teacher spoke to me (we've been at this studio 7 years). Thanks for the advise. - Shara "

 

Its funny how different opinions can be. My own DD is going to a two week intermediate intensive and her teacher said she wanted her to go to something longer. :innocent:

 

Two weeks for her first time away for any extended period of time is enough, not to mention that two weeks is more affordable than five, and I would miss her! :wink:

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