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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Triple pirouettes


Claude_Catastrophique

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One of my goals for 2009 is good triples by the end of the year. Finally I found the courage to stay up on relevé after two turns and keep turning but after about 2 1/2 turns my upper bad keeps turning faster than my feet and my legs do and you can imagine what is going to happen :sweating: When I put more force into the turn, I throw myself off balance right at the beginning with the first turn. I tried to analyze if it is the head and I am not sure if I should spot slower once the turn is going to slow down... :unsure:

 

Is it just a question of practice or is there anything I can do about coordinating upper body and legs better after the first two turns? I have really calm and coordinated, well balanced doubles now and I am really afraid to ruin that by throwing myself out of this while practisig triples.

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Don't practice triples. Practice just staying up as long as you can during a double and not stop it but letting it go further if you are up and balanced. The more you keep spiraling upward, the longer you can turn and stay on balance. :sweating:

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And spot your head faster. I say this knowing full well that that's a major fault of mine, but when I do follow it (for some reason I'm afraid my head will spin off the neck - don't ask me why!), I can do triples as well.

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Thanks for your answers! Spotting could be one of the problems....I am not sure but so I will try to spot faster. I am not quite sure what you mean by staying up: Do you mean, double pirouette and then keep balancing without turning or just doubles and then keep on turning as far as it goes itself? I did the first version for singles and this was really helpful so I guess I should try the same with doubles...am I right?

 

Edit: Ah yes, first version! I did not read properly! Sorry.

 

Just for my curiosity: And if that works how do I continue? :dry:

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Just a little bit more force from your back muscles and get that third spot! One of the biggest problems with multiple turns is that people seem to think the turn is over before it's over and not do the last spot.

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Thank you for the quick answer! This is really true, it seems to be a common problem (me included).

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Just a little bit more force from your back muscles and get that third spot! One of the biggest problems with multiple turns is that people seem to think the turn is over before it's over and not do the last spot.

 

 

Or, in my case, my knees and the "leg/butt" muscles think it's over before it's over and I end up coming down to quickly. :( Why is it that one can hold a balance in retiré or attitude seemingly forever at the barre, but as soon as you add movement (a turn) to it, the muscles don't want to hold you there anymore?

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When you are balancing you are basically still, no movement to get you off your center. Just a little bit of movement can throw off that center, so, it needs to be really strong. The other factor might be psychological. There are some people who really like turning. That creates confidence because they turn relatively well, confidence increases, they turn better. :thumbsup: Seriously, you have to be willing to keep going up and not think about coming down. You have to LIKE it up there! :(

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Claude, if your body is turning faster than your foot, Could it be you are not holding your turnout? I've been focusing on holding my turnout for multiples.

 

 

All the best!

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The other factor might be psychological. There are some people who really like turning. That creates confidence because they turn relatively well, confidence increases, they turn better. :(

 

Hmm. This makes sense. I tend to go into doubles thinking "I hope this one works." Sometimes it does. But if I start to feel my knee bending I get frustrated and loose my confidence, and end up coming down early. And that sets me up for expecting the same thing the next time around. :thumbsup:

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As complicated as pirouettes are technically, they are just as tied to the psychological thing. People who believe they can turn, turn. Those who are not sure, hesitant, lacking confidence, automatically pull back a bit and there goes any hope of a decent turn. Starting a turn with a question mark in your brain does not work well. :thumbsup:

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I think what Ms Leigh is saying is something everyone can relate to.

 

When you're just a second away from turning, and have the confidence to just think "here goes a double", it's like half the turn is done just by the confidence. I find that if I am convinced I can turn a double, I find more support on the plié, more stability on the relevé and a more effective line overall.

 

But... speaking of the plié, should a plié be deeper if a turn is meant to be multiple?

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No, I don't think the plié needs to be any deeper. The amount of push from the legs is pretty much the same for any pirouette, but the amount of impetus from the torso is increased.

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You remind me a lot of an SI teacher I had: She let us spin around just without technique, with some fun music and afterwards she always asked "Do you looooove pirouettes?" (and we had to shout "Yes!") and afterwards ist worked better!

 

I can't tell wether I loose my turnout or not. I have to watch that next time I do them.

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