Jump to content
Ballet Talk for Dancers

14 year old requirement


dascmom

Recommended Posts

Hi all!

My daughter has just turned 14, is an eighth grader, who has been described as having a great deal of potential at the ballet school she attends. She would like to have a career in dancing (and attend an excellent dance college). What are the requirements for what she should be taking as a 14 year old, and then what are the requirements for what she needs as she proceeds through high school? Is there a good book available that outlines the steps she needs to take? Also, she will be studying this summer at her home studio, but what are the best summer intensives to audition for next summer? I realize this is a HUGE question and it probably has been asked before, but I would so appreciate your responses. Thank you all.

Link to post

Get her the best quality training in the right quantity that will not break the bank. Generally, she should be doing a 1.5 hour ballet class 5-6 days per week; Character 1 x weekly; Pointe class immediately following the ballet technique class preferably after every ballet technique class, but at least 3-4 X per week immediately following ballet class; Variations/Repertoire classes at least 1 x per week; Jazz class & Modern once per week; there should be some performing opportunities offered as well.

 

For SIs, all have their merits, but what works for 1 doesn't work for another, so read, read, read through all of our threads on each SI & see where might be a good fit for her. She should audition for several programs that she is interested in and not put all her eggs in 1 basket.

 

As she gets closer to job age, she needs to investigate companies and cities, including cost-of-living analysis so she can narrow down some companies she might be interested in dancing with. From there, auditioning for their SIs is a good way to try out the city and the company, as well as hopefully raise some interest in her on the part of those doing the hiring.

 

She'll also have to have grit, determination, thick skin, a need to dance like the need to breathe, a body that is well suited to the physical demands of the career, the ability to live as a pauper, & a frighteningly amazing work ethic. She'll have to be no stranger to rejection and will need to learn to develop coping techniques because rejection is the only certainty in ballet.

 

As far as your family- well, the other children will feel like they come second or third, and will resent the amount of time and money that is devoted to the dancer. They will feel short-changed unless as a family, you all decide where the boundaries will be for the entire family.

 

Bottom line is, with this career, you absolutely cannot focus on the carrot at the end of the stick (the prized contract), but on the stick itself. Regardless of whether a job as a professional ballet dancer is the result or not, the journey can be well worth it for everyone, if balance is key. :) Think carefully about every member of your family; determine budgets based on available existing funds- don't mortgage your own lives away; allow the dancer to be a person too. Sacrifices will occur, but be careful they do not become larger than everyone in the family is prepared to give.

 

That's the reality of it all, however, if you ask any dancer today she or he will avidly state that they wouldn't have chosen/couldn't have chosen any other path. They are generally fulfilled, intelligent, articulate, talented people with bright futures ahead of them after the ballet career is finished.

Link to post
scballetmom

Clara 76 Your post is a succinct answer to a complex question! Full of wisdom and worth becoming a "sticky"!

Link to post
:wink: AW shucks!! Thank you.
Link to post
  • Administrators
Victoria Leigh

Totally agree!!! Thank you, Ms. Clara :wink:

Link to post

Clara76 - Amazing how you summarized our almost 14 year old journey of ballet. Not only should it become a sticky but required reading for all on this board. Thank you for your wisdom.

Link to post
Clara76 - Amazing how you summarized our almost 14 year old journey of ballet. Not only should it become a sticky but required reading for all on this board. Thank you for your wisdom.

I can see that we have some work to do. She is not taking nearly that many hours. In fact, her current studio doesn't offer that type of a schedule. I appreciate the answer. (Not that it doesn't stress me out a bit!)

Link to post
Momof3darlings

An absolutely wonderful post Clara76, definitely sticky worthy!

Link to post
mydarlindancer

"She'll also have to have grit, determination, thick skin, a need to dance like the need to breathe, a body that is well suited to the physical demands of the career, the ability to live as a pauper, & a frighteningly amazing work ethic. She'll have to be no stranger to rejection and will need to learn to develop coping techniques because rejection is the only certainty in ballet."

 

...and still, our young ones forge ahead, all of them experiencing this. You are spot on, Ms. Clara! This is worth sticky status, I definitely agree.

 

dascmom....great question, and don't let this scare you too much. It can be done! Yet, it does sound like you might have to reconsider your DD's training schedule.

Link to post

Ok. It's a sticky titled, "Recipe for ballet..."

Link to post
  • Administrators
Victoria Leigh
Link to post
scballetmom

Thanks, Clara! Many will benefit from this. It would be a great shame for such a post to be lost in the masses!

Link to post
  • 4 weeks later...

When my dd was 10 and after some 4 years of dance, she decided she wanted to be a dancer as a career. We investigated the requirements and discovered some dancers do not need to go to college and can just audition. But, since there are no guarantees, we should prepare her for dance college just in case.

 

We googled various dance colleges with good reputations and printed out their admissions applications and started filling them out with her limited experience at age 10. This exercise gave her a realistic approach to the road ahead of her.

 

The blanks involved things like "List workshops, summer intensives attended". It also required letters of recommendations from dance instructors. It also wanted a list of "awards or recognitions received."

 

The applications acted sort of like a road map about what we needed to do in the next 6 to 7 years and gave us clues as to what we needed to investigate.

Link to post

That's a great idea, Curandera!!!!!! :(

 

And welcome to Ballet Talk for Dancers!!!!!! :(

Link to post

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

  • Recently Browsing   0 members

    No registered users viewing this page.

×
×
  • Create New...