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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Hop to come down from sous-sus en pointe?


Ballet Bunnie

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I watched a really really old VHR named Pointe by Pointe last week. While I really loved how Ms. Barbara Fewster explains the steps, and some of the combinations, her method of a "slight spring" to come down from sous-sus en pointe seems strange to me. I've never seen or been taught with the method to come down from sous-sus. I've discussed with a teacher, and she was not so found of it either -- "If they want to make it a hop, why don't they just do some real hop en pointe?"

So is anyone using this method on a regular basis in class to get off pointe from sous-sus?

If not, are there any reasons for Ms. Fewster to do that?

:shrug:

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I would not call it a "hop", but if you just roll through the feet from sous-sus, without moving them back to where they came from in the demi plié 5th, you would come down is a waaaay over-crossed 5th! :thumbsup: So, yes, there is a movement of the feet which could be described as a slight spring, although not a hop.

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My teachers instruct this way, as well. In sous-sus you have to bring both feet in to hit the position, so it's logical to have bring them both out again to come down.

 

Is it possible it's something you've done without verbalizing it in this manner? I don't see another way to do it; is there one?

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I would not call it a "hop", but if you just roll through the feet from sous-sus, without moving them back to where they came from in the demi plié 5th, you would come down is a waaaay over-crossed 5th! :yucky: So, yes, there is a movement of the feet which could be described as a slight spring, although not a hop.

 

What's the difference between a "hop" and a light spring though? For me, it looks like that her foot action is like the beginning of hop...

 

:shrug:

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A hop would generally leave the ground, like a jump. The slight spring is different action from a roll through, but it is not really a jump at all.

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  • 2 weeks later...

I've had to address this topic for students taking classes that asked for that "hop" off pointe as well as my classes, and I found that if I explained it discussing the sensation of lengthening the body weight up and out of the shoes and into the legs and torso in order to allow both feet to move at the same time, the students were able to better make a smooth transition into demi-plié in fifth position as well as making the other instructors happy with their work. Do you think that by asking for the "hop" off pointe, the instructor is hoping to exaggerate this feeling and eventually make it more subtle and artistic?

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