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Mayfly

Glissades over and under, So Confused!!

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Mayfly

I am so confused!! :helpsmilie: All of my ballet life I have thought that a glissade over referred to the the following movement :-

 

For instance if you are in 5th position with your right foot in front, the right foot extends to the right and the weight is transferred to the right foot bringing the left foot over to close in front. Similarly a glissade under would start by extending the back foot to the side and transferring the weight to that foot and closing the front foot behind i.e. it is the following foot rather than the leading foot which determines the over or under movement.

 

I am now being told that it is exactly the reverse of this in that it is the leading foot which determines the over or under movement rather than the following foot.

 

Looking at various ballet forums there seems to be a lot of confusion over this. Can anyone confirm the correct position please?

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Moonlily

Are the people that told you that it is the reverse of what you've known until now from a different method background? I'm not an expert on this but this could possibly explain it. When we were doing glissades in one of our recent classes our teacher explained to a student who was new to this studio and had previously trained in a Russian school that it is the reverse of what they teach there, just so she isn't confused by the terms.

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dancemad

Exactly the opposite for me! It is determined by where the leading foot finishes. May be your are confusing it with a pas de bouree which can of course be over/under with either foot? :)

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Hans

Gail Grant says:

 

Glissade dessous. Glissade under. This glissade travels to the side and is commenced with the front foot, which finishes at the back. Fifth position R foot front; demi-plié and slide the pointed toe of the R foot to the second position. With a slight spring from the L foot, shift the weight to the R foot, bending the knee, and slide the pointed L foot to the fifth position front, lowering the heel and bending the knee.

 

Glissade dessus is, of course, the opposite.

 

With that said, different methods and even individual teachers could define it differently--as long as the students know what they want. So the important thing is that you know what your teacher wants you to do, or conversely, that the teacher communicates effectively to his/her students.

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Hamorah

It is definitely the leading foot which determines what the glissade is called. There are quite a few different glissades not just the under and over kind and it is the first foot that opens out which defines it. Under or dessous is the front foot finishing behind. Over or dessus is the back foot finishing front. Devant is the front foot finishing front and derriere is the back foot finishing behind. It's always that first foot which is what counts. You can be taught other ways but that is the clearest way of thinking in my opinion as it is also connected to the direction that you're going to.

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BethK

There seem to be many definitions here, according to what school you're trained in, or what book you've read. My students come from all over the map, so I mainly try to teach them to see what I'm showing, rather than trying to get them to remember terms that might conflict with what they already know. Eye training is an important part of ballet training! :)

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