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Ballet Talk for Dancers

How Do I Apply Rosin?


spotlightdancer

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spotlightdancer

I bought my own bottle of rosin from discount dance supply and Im not sure how to apply it to my shoes. I know it has to be crushed but it didn't come in that powdery form like I thought it was gonna be in. It is like little tiny crystals. Am I suppose to crush it myself? And If I am how am I suppose to do that? Am I suppose to leave it in its container or do I have to pour into like a box or something? And can I use it for non-pointe shoes? Im really confused please help...

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renee...what are you trying to accomplish by using the rosin? What is your home studio's policy on the use of rosin on their floors?

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spotlightdancer

Im trying to reduce the chance of slipping, and my studio lets us use it

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Since your studio allows you to use it, I would ask you instructor where they would like you to put it. You will need to crush it up and that is usually done with the ball of your foot on the floor. Please, do not do that barefoot! If the studio is use to having students use it I would look for a rosin box where you could do that. If it is done directly on the floor, that spot will end up being ruined over time. I would also recommend using it only when it is necessary and only very little. A lot of schools with a "marley" surface do not allow the use of rosin. Over time, the use of rosin on a "marley" floor will ruin the floor. Wood floors are very different and will likely need the dancer to use rosin.

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  • 8 years later...
oliviaandkiki07

Would rosin work on sweaty feet, if not what should we use for sweaty feet when on stage? 

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Miss Persistent

Hi Oliviaandkiki07, welcome to BT4D.

If you mean sweaty feet inside shoes, I would not use rosin.  It is essentially dried tree sap and is designed to create friction between the floor and the outside of the shoe and it can be very hard and abrasive.  Putting rosin on skin can lead to far too much friction and create blisters or tear the skin on the feet.  More useful might be a powder that will absorb the sweat.  You local pharmacy should have a range of foot products designed to keep feet dry - usually sold to help eliminate odour (as that comes from sweat).  Something like talcum powder is more along the lines of what you need (though I know some countries have banned talcum powder now because of risk of inhaled particles).  I would see what you can find in a drugstore/pharmacy etc. to start with.  Good luck!

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