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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Starting pointe at 14?


MissBassPlayer97

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So I go to a dance studio where they start pointe at a young age, but they make sure your feet/ankles are strong enough (they start around 4/5th grade). I always opposed of starting pointe so young, so I didn't want to get a pointe evaluation until two years ago. The 'main' pointe teacher said I wasn't ready yet, and I was discouraged, and didn't get an evaluation for a while. Now I'm 13 and want to start pointe next year, but I'll be with all the younger girls! I really want to do pointe. I'm also overweight, but I plan on losing weight this year. Anyway, should I do it, or not? (I've been dancing for 9 years)

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  • Administrators

Welcome to Ballet Talk for Dancers, MissBassPlayer97. :)

 

It's not a problem to start pointe work a bit later than usual, however, it is very important that you are physically and technically very ready to begin. In order for us to help you we need a bit more information about your training. How long have you been studying ballet? Has your training been consistent? How many classes a week in ballet technique do you take, and how long are the classes? Are willing to work at the beginning with younger students? If not, then are you sure that you really want to dance on pointe?

 

There is a post that you need to read entitled Facts of Life About Pointe Work. It is one of the Pinned topics at the top of this forum. :)

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This is my 9th year in ballet and dancing in general. I've only taken one ballet class every year. This year its two hours long, but in past years they were 1.5 hours. I also take 4 hours of other classes on a different day (jazz, lyrical, and contemporary). Since I started ballet, I haven't had a year off.

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It sounds like your somewhat of a "competition dancer" or in other words an all around dancer meaning that you do all styles of dance but a limited amount of each style. Which makes me think that, from the schedule you explained it sounds as though you need at least two more ballet classes added in there per week before starting pointe work just because as you said, it's very important to have strong feet when you go en pointe. And regarding the am I too old question, I truly believe that it's never too late to start ballet or pointe. My level is all 12-15 year olds and about two years ago a 27 year old joined our level and we all love her! (She's very tiny so she blends in quite well :lol:)

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I started ballet about six months ago and I am 14. I am in a class of 11&12 year olds who are going en pointe in four or five months. I will be starting pointe at age 14 and I encourage you to do so as well!

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  • 1 month later...

It's never to late to practice pointe work!!! One icon is Misty Copeland, who started ballet recreationally at 13. Now she's a soloist at ABT!

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I have to say that Misty Copeland had amazing balletic qualities!! She has hyperextension, and amazing feet. Also, Mods correct me if I'm wrong, she started training professionally, not recreationally, at 13. Misty Copeland only managed to get into ABT when she started training that late was because she had what many people would consider a perfect ballet body!! But that doen't mean you can't start pointe recreationally!! I started pointe at 13, but had to stop because I dislocated and broke my shoulder and was ordered to stop dancing until it heals, and it's never too late!! I know a lot of people who started ballet late, and started pointe too! I have to say though, I think you should add more ballet classes to your schedule. Hope this helps!! :)

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Dancers, while encouraging others is almost always a good thing to do, in the case of pointe work it is not. PLEASE read post #2 above, and PLEASE go to the link I put in that post. And by the way, pointe work on a recreational track is NOT recommended. You will understand after reading that link. Then read post #4, above.

 

Also, please realize that having a "perfect ballet body" is not the only criteria for achieving a professional career. Oh yes, it helps, and it can somewhat speed up the process, however, without both exceptional quality and quantity of training, plus many other elements...think coordination, grace, musicality, artistry, passion, work ethic, intelligence, financial support....it is not going to happen. Ms. Copeland did not get there from recreational training or without all of the other elements besides a perfect body!

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  • 2 months later...

Where is the post about why pointe work on a recreational track is not recommended? Thanks(:

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It is at the bottom of the 'Pinned' topics at the top of this forum, and is called Facts of Life About Pointe Work.

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