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Ballet Talk for Dancers

Fouetté Sauté


sallydancer035

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I was thinking about fouette sautes. I once heard someone talking about a 'fouette saute en tournant', but I was wondering how you would not turn while doing just a 'fouette saute'? Maybe I have the two steps confused but I always did a 'fouette sauté' with a grande battement devant and the body turning away from the working leg and landing with that leg derriere. Is that not en tournant?

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A fouetté sauté is what you described, sallydancer. It can be done going from jumping on the grand battement front, turning in the air and landing in arabesque, or it can be reversed and done with a grand battement derrière jump, turning in the air, and landing in a front extension. Technically, the first one would be an en dedans fouetté sauté, and the reverse an en dehors. The same movement can be done with a piqué or with a relevé, as in piqué fouetté or relevé fouetté. :) They all turn, but they are not full turns, just half turns, but I think they are not specified as en tournant simply because to do the step one must turn!

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Thank you! So it is still the same step even when 'en tournant' is added? And are pique and releve fouettes the same? Really sorry about all the questions, it's just there are so many variations of names for steps - it can get confusing!

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Yes, it is the same step whether is done with a piqué, a relevé, or a sauté. :) I would not add the en tournant because there is no other way that any of these moves can be done! So, it is redundant.

 

I'm going to change your title to Fouetté Sauté, just so that everyone will know it is not about the turning fouettés!

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Also, I heard someone say 'pas de bourree courus' which is what I learned as the second part of this video: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1hdHc1hJAWU

But then they said it could be done en avant and en arriere, but I was wondering how this could be executed?

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I would not call this a pas de bourrée courru. She is demonstrating pas de bourré dessus (over), dessous (under), en avant, en arrière, and en tournant. Corru is a running step, like traveling bourrés or the little runs on point in parallel, often called pas courru, like we see in a lot of variations.

 

EDIT: I responded below to this, as I had not seen the second part of the video when I responded last night.

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Sorry for asking but, how would you describe a pas de bourree courru, Ms Leigh? After reading this and watching the video, I am quite confused as to what a pas de bourre courru is? I've never heard it before.

Edited by emmypointe
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Sorry, dancers. I had only seen the first part of the video, with the regular pas de bourrés. When it stopped I thought that was all there was and did not see the pas de bourré corru section.

 

This morning I inadvertently deleted the post asking about grand fouetté sauté and fouetté sauté battu, so I am responding here to a question that is not there. :o Really sorry about that. :(

 

 

Yes, they are also called grand fouetté sauté. That is the most correct name for it, I should have mentioned that! It may be done with a beat, which is done either on the jump to the front battement, which is like a front cabriole before the turn in the air to the arabesque, or, one can do the fouetté and put the beat in the back, after the actual fouetté, like a back cabriole before landing. To distinguish where the beat is to take place I call the one with the front beat a cabriole fouetté, and the other one a fouetté cabriole. :) You most often see male dancers doing this, although it certainly can be done by female dancers. Males even do a double beat sometimes!

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Thank you for explaining it Ms Leigh, this has certainly cleared it all up! Just one more thing, I also heard about a 'grande jete battu en tournant', which has also been confusing me. Could you explain this to me? Thank you!

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Pretty much the same as grand fouetté sauté battu. You add a beat of the legs into the step. It is also generally executed by male dancers. I don't think I have even seen a female do it, but there are probably some out there who could. :)

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