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Hyperextension in one leg only?


Guest Nadezhda

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Guest Nadezhda

I have hyperextension in my right leg, but not in my left one. The odd thing about it, is that when on releve, it is very hard to balance on my hyperextended leg as there is much less arch in my foot than on the other. If I try not to stretch the leg fully, it isn't right (technically) and does not feel ok. What am I to do?

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Without seeing you, I'm really not sure, Nadezhda, but my guess is that you need to adjust the placement somewhat on that leg. You might be pushing into the hyperextension instead of getting far enough up out of it by using the muscles of the derrière and the quadriceps and keeping the weight well forward. I'm sure it is correctable, but think it needs to be corrected by someone who can see you in relevé.

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Something strikes me as a bit odd here; hyperextension, being a major formation of the skeleton, is usually bilaterally symmetrical. I've only seen one dancer with one leg hyperextended and one not, and she had been in a very severe accident. Have you had a serious injury to one leg only?

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Guest Nadezhda

Ms. Leigh-

thank you for your advice. I have never actually thought of that. I will keep your suggestion in mind. :)

 

Mr. Johnson-

no, I haven't had any serious accident. I had a small injury in a tendeon in the leg that is not hyperextended; it was properly treated and I don't think it could result in what you suggested. I was amazed to find that hyperextension occurs (in my case) only in one leg, but I'm quite sure that the other leg is not hyperextended. (Even if it is, it is hyperextended to a MUCH smaller degree.) However my hyperextension is nothing compared to Sylvie Guillem or Lucia Laccara hyperextension.

 

There is one other thing that I've thought of now. I also have hyperextended finger joints. (Do you know what I mean?) But this hyperextension is more evident in fingers on my left hand (but I have a hyperextended right leg), though there is some in fingers on my right as well. Any clues? :confused:

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Wow, what an unusual case! And yes, I have hyperextended fingers, too - I was a big hit learning Thai dances when I was over there - not many westerners catch on to the Thai hand aesthetic, let alone do it!

 

I wish I could see this situation - I think you may be rocking back into the leg and emphasizing a misalignment, rather than have true hyperextension, but I'd really need to see you working!:confused:

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Nadezhda, it is not unusual to have hyperextension in some joints and not in others. There are a lot of people who have it in their hands and fingers, but not legs, and vice-versa. I have a lot of hyperextension in the legs and elbows, but not at all in the hands or fingers. Weird, huh? ;)

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Guest attitude

I also have the same sort of imbalanced hyperextension. My right leg is more hyperextended than the left (also not quite like Sylvie Guillem's) but I've always thought that it's because my right leg is stronger and I can hold that extension much easier, with the left my leg always feels like it wants to bend at the knee even if I'm trying to keep it straight. The difference is not so noticeable if I'm standing flat say in first position but noticable if I tendu a la seconde. My fingers and elbows are a lot worse boths sides are freakishly hyperextended but the right sides are extremely freakishly hyperextend:eek:

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Guest Nadezhda

Thank you all for your replies.

 

Mr. Johnson -

I'm not very sure about "sinking" too deep into what might be hyperextension. But the thing is, if I transfer my weight onto my heels more, the curvature is not so evident. If I transfer my weight onto my toes (I think that is the thing to do, if not, please, let me know!) I feel a bit of uncomfortable strain in my knee. Is this what you meant by emphasizing a curvature, that is not really there, too much? I'm pulling my weight up and I'm not sinking into my hips. I'm sure of that because I got corrected in this 2 years ago and I am constantly trying to stay aware of it.

 

Ms. Leigh-

I know what wonderful hyperextension you have in legs! I've seen your 2 pictures. :) But I'm wondering, how do you place your weight in for ex. first position? Do you leave a little place between the heels? Just wondering. I don't have (if what I have is hyperextension :) ) to do that.

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Now, there's an interesting situation! But yes, the weight should be kept forward in the foot, in a zone about from the middle of the ball of the foot to the very front of the ball of the heel. It's a good thing that you continue to pay attention to how the hips are used!:)

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Guest Nadezhda

Thank you, Mr. Johnson. I will try to talk about it with my teachers when I get back to school in September. Until then I will try not to work too much against what is there. :)

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  • 3 weeks later...
Guest Jhora

I also am grossly hyperextended (my right is more HE then my left) and I agree that the reason one leg has more curvature could be to the strength of the leg- it seems logical. I also noticed that I do have to stand with my heels slightly out in first position - it seems overly eccentuated en pointe as well. The tip my teacher gave to me that has helped me and the other student in my class who is hyperextended was to make sure to use the derriere (sp) muscles tucked in (pushing the hips slightly forward) and pull up through the stomach and spine. Good luck - it seems hard to get used to but it looks pretty once you've got it!

Jhora

P.S. Watch out for tendonitis in the knees

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Jhora, please be careful when giving advice, as sometimes that advice is not quite as helpful as you mean it to be. The term "tucked in" and "pushing pelvis forward" is NOT something one should do in any circumstances, hyperextended or not! When you tuck in and push the pelvis forward it causes sitting into the hips, and this is exactly opposite of what you need to do. While the muscles in the gluteous maximus need to be used, they must not be gripped or tucked. Those terms can create a very wrong impression of what one is really trying to do in terms of attaining correct alignment of the pelvis.

 

With hyperextension it is very important to not allow the pelvis to tilt backwards and especially to keep the weight of the body forward over the metatarsals, not pushing into the heels which allows the pelvis to go back and the knees to hyperextend. However, "tucking" will create the opposite effect to an extreme, which is sitting, and also pushes the weight back too far into the heels.

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  • 9 months later...
  • Administrators

It's "Ms. Leigh" ;) And you can find the photos by clicking on Ballet Alert Online, below, which takes you to the Home Page of this web site. From there click on the link to Who We Are.

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